ASTIS - Arctic Science and Technology Information System


A search of the ASTIS database for "TAG DIRS" has found the following 225 records, which are sorted by first author.


Devon Island Research Station, 1975
(Arctic, v. 28, no. 3, Sept. 1975, p. 226)
ASTIS record 53531.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic28-3-226.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2838
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute field station on the Truelove Lowlands of Devon Island was activated for a brief period during late July and August of this year, largely for the purposes of an inspection of the station buildings and equipment, and the performance of necessary maintenance operations. Researchers present during the season, and their projects, were: Dr. Carlyle Jordan and Mr. Robert Merrick, University of Guelph, Ontario: Biological fixation of nitrogen in arctic sedge-moss; Dr. G.M. Courtin and Mr. Peter Nosko, Laurentian University, Ontario: Water relations of Carex stans on Devon Island; Dr. D. Pearson, Laurentian University, Ontario: Palaeozoic sedimentary cover. In spite of several days of unusually heavy rain, Dr. Jordan and Mr. Merrick managed to complete almost every phase of their planned experiments in the study of the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. They estimated the fixation rates at several sites - on a mesic meadow, a beach ridge, an intermediate zone and a polar desert site - under aerobic, microaerophilic, light and dark conditions, and with microbial activity stimulated by glucose addition and blocked by a metabolic inhibitor. The biomass activity was determined at each site by carbon dioxide evolution from added glucose. Core samples were removed at two depths from each site and from additional sites on a hydric meadow and on a bog polygon. Other data included soil temperatures, pH and oxidation-reduction potential. In addition, Dr. Jordan took the opportunity to visually survey the area in the immediate vicinity of the base camp with a view to the better location of other sites for sampling in the near future. A collection of flowering plants from Devon Island was also made. Soil cores removed by Dr. Jordan and Mr. Merrick will be examined bacteriologically at the University of Guelph, while the polar desert material will be the subject of part of a study by the University's Department of Land Resource Science. In addition, intact moss blocks from Devon Island have been kept alive in a healthy state at the University, and Mr. Merrick will study the numbers, types and activities of the microorganisms associated with the moss surfaces. Such associated microorganisms, principally the blue-green algae, appear to dominate nitrogen fixation in the arctic ecosystem, and the relationships between their activities and the moss surfaces are of considerable importance. Dr. Courtin and his assistant made further sample collections to support their earlier studies carried on at Devon Island under the sponsorship of the Canadian Committee of the International Biological Program. Dr. Pearson was concerned with reconnaissance of the area with a view to possible future programmes of study of geological processes. Mr. Ward Elcock, camp manager, reported that all buildings were intact, and that intrusions bipolar bears had not occurred as in previous years. Maintenance work at the station included tidying-up operations around the station area, the erection of radio antenna masts, and a general inventory. The Institute acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of the Polar Continental Shelf Project in making this very short season a successful one. (Au)

H, F, J, B, C

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Ecology of Collembola at a High Arctic site, Devon Island, N.W.T   /   Addison, J.A.   Parkinson, D. [Supervisor]
Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary, 1975.
xv, 212 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
(Canadian theses on microfiche, no. 28477)
Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Calgary, Dept. of Biology, Calgary, Alta., 1975.
Bibliography: p. 194-210.
ASTIS record 34271.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The ecology of the collembolan fauna was investigated at 3 sites on the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. Since Hypogastrura tullbergi Schaffer and Folsomia regularis Hammer were the two most abundant species on the Truelove Lowland, much of the research centered on these species. Population densities of Collembola, based on derived means were 4,700 Collembola m at the Meadow Site, 11,700 m at the Beach Ridge Site, and 14,700 m at the Transition Zone Site. Investigations into the population biology of Hypogastrura tullbergi indicated that reproductive activity was confined to a period of 2-3 weeks every season, and that individuals of this species were able to breed in up to 3 different years. Individuals of Folsomia regularis and Hypogastrura tullbergi were estimated to survive for up to 4 and 5 years respectively, and both species had flexible life cycles. The most important factors influencing collembolan distribution on Devon Island were humidity and temperature. The macroflora was considered to affect collembolan populations indirectly, by modifying the microclimate. In laboratory feeding studies, Hypogastrura tullbergi showed a clear preference for fungal substrates whereas Folsomia regularis selected decomposing organic materials. Analysis of the gut contents of field caught animals indicated that both species ingested mainly organic matter, although fungal materials constituted a higher percentage of the gut contents of H. tullbergi than of F. regularis. Growth rates of both H. tullbergi and F. regularis were low, and growth of H. tullbergi at field temperatures was found to be limited by diet rather than temperature per se. Maximum growth rates of adult individuals of H. tullbergi occurred at 10C. The temperature response of growth rates in juvenile individuals of H. tullbergi differed from that of the adults, with juveniles showing measurable increases in weight at 2C, and maximum growth rates at 15C instead of 10C. At 10C the respiratory rates of Hypogastrura tullbergi (222.7 l O2/g dry wt/h) and Onychiurus groenlandicus Tullberg (118.7 l O2/g dry wt/h) were lower than those reported for cold-adapted Collembola, but the rate of respiration of Folsomia regularis (305 l O2/g dry wt/h) indicated some degree of adaptation to cold climates. The rates of soil metabolism in experimental soil cores under field conditions were generally higher in the presence of Collembola than when these animals were excluded. Different species of Collembola enhanced soil metabolism by different amounts. At high densities in laboratory experiments, Collembola apparently caused a decrease in the rate of organic matter decomposition. In conclusion, ecological adaptations, and the functional role of Collembola in a High Arctic Ecosystem were discussed. (Au)

I, J, E, C
Animal ecology; Animal food; Animal growth; Animal population; Animal respiration; Atmospheric humidity; Atmospheric temperature; Bioclimatology; Biodegradation; Biological sampling; Cold adaptation; Collembola; Internal organs; Metabolism; Necropsy; Oxygen; Soil microorganisms; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Population dynamics and biology of Collembola on Truelove Lowland   /   Addison, J.A.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 363-382, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16649.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Collembola are amongst the most abundant and widespread of soil arthropods. Species lists for several areas of the Canadian Arctic Islands are now available (Oliver 1963, McAlpine 1965, Danks and Byers 1972), but there has been little attempt to measure the seasonal variation in abundance of different species, and even less to investigate the biological significance of collembolan populations. ... The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the population dynamics, life histories, and feeding biology of certain arctic collembolan species, and (2) to attempt to define the impact of the biological activities of these animals on the environment. Field work was carried out during the summer months of 1972, 1973, and 1974, with most of the work taking place during the latter two years. As Hypogastrura tullbergi and Folsomia regularis were the most widely distributed and abundant Collembola at the Devon island site, much of the research centered on these two species. (Au)

I
Animal population; Collembola

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Biology of Hypogastrura tullbergi (Collembola) at a High Arctic site   /   Addison, J.A.
(Holarctic ecology, v. 4, no. 1, Feb. 1981, p. 49-58, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 7917.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1600-0587.1981.tb00980.x
Libraries: ACU

The life cycle, reproductive biology and growth rates of Hypogastrura tullbergi (Schaffer), one of the most abundant and widespread Collembola on Devon Island, N.W.T., were investigated. ... The adaptive significance of aspects of the biology of H. tullbergi for long-term survival in tundra environments is discussed. (Au)

I
Collembola

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Studies on evapotranspiration and energy budgets on Truelove Lowland   /   Addison, P.A.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 281-300
References.
ASTIS record 16644.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

...It is important that energy budget studies accompany those of water balance, since plant adaptations for water conservation may have far reaching effects on the overall energy regime of a plant community. Plant adaptations to water deficit, therefore, are limited to some extent, because a balance must be reached between the minimum rate of water loss possible and the maximum leaf temperature that can be tolerated. The aims of this study were: (1) to determine the energy budgets of the two dominant plant communities in this high arctic ecosystem; (2) to study the plant-soil-water relations of plant communities at the ends of a soil moisture gradient; and (3) to explore the ecological implications of presumed adaptations to environmental conditions. Two sites, a raised beach and a meadow, were chosen for intensive study as they represented the two dominant vegetation types on Truelove Lowland (Bliss 1972). ... (Au)

H, J
Effects of climate on plants; Energy budgets; Evaporation; Plant ecology; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Synoptic climate controls of mass-balance variations on Devon ice cap   /   Alt, B.T.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 10, no. 1, Feb. 1978, p. 61-80, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 162.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550657
Libraries: ACU

Fourteen years (1961 through 1974) of synoptic weather charts for June through August were examined along with available meteorological and glaciological data from the northwest region of Devon Island ice cap, N.W.T., Canada. Use of a simple synoptic classification system facilitated investigation of the manner in which summer synoptic conditions control mass-balance fluctuations on the ice cap. ... (Au)

F, E
Effects of climate on snow; Glaciers; Mass balance; Spatial distribution; Synoptic climatology

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut


Association of plant distribution patterns and microenvironments on patterned ground in a polar desert, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Anderson, D.G.   Bliss, L.C.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 30, no. 2, May 1998, p. 97-107, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 47205.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1552124
Libraries: ACU

In this study, we quantify the distribution patterns of vascular plant species among microsites (stony border, transition, and center) of sorted stone nets and stripes. We also monitored edaphic factors (frost heave, temperature, moisture, and texture) at three intensive sites to identify controls on plant distribution. Adult plants were more abundant in the transition microsite (73 and 77%) with its cryptogamic crust than random distribution would predict (transition cover 17 and 14%) at the noncrusted stone nets and stone strips, respectively. Adult plants were frost heaved (10 and 32%) from the bare-soil center microsites at both sites. Nearly all of the few seedlings were in the transition microsite. At the crusted stone net, three species were randomly distributed; five species were over-represented in the two border microsites and two species were underrepresented there. No plants were frost heaved at this site and seedlings were abundant. There were 7.3 plants per lineal meter at the crusted net and only 3.0 and 2.3 plants per lineal meter at the noncrusted stone stripes and stone nets respectively. Of the environmental factors measured, soil heave (measured as soil settlement) appears most influential. Surface soils (0-1 cm) dry between summer rains and this may inhibit seedling establishment some summers. Soils at depth (5-10 cm) remain near saturation. Soil temperatures differed little between microsites as did soil texture. (Au)

J, H, C
Frost heaving; Patterned ground; Plant distribution; Plant-soil relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Thawing; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Arctic Institute Devon Island Expedition 1960   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 13, no. 4, Dec. 1960, p. 270-271)
ASTIS record 60946.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic13-4-270.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3707
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute of North America ... initiated the Devon Island Expedition 1960-1963, the objectives of which are: (1) A study of the relationships between the marine environment (Jones Sound), the Devon Island Ice Cap, and the atmosphere, with special regard to heat budget, energy flow, and moisture transfer. (2) A detailed investigation of the oceanography and marine biology of Jones Sound. (3) A detailed investigation of the archaeology, biology, and geology of Devon Island, together with other studies that may provide auxiliary information for objective (1). The main purpose of the 1960 expedition was to establish facilities and cache supplies to support the scientific program beginning in 1961. ... The party left Quebec City on July 31 on board C.M.S. d'Iberville and arrived off Cape Skogn, Devon Island on August 20. By August 24 a camp consisting of three prefabricated Jamesway buildings and stores for twenty people for 5 months was installed at 7542'N. 8426'W. An 18-mile tractor route to the edge of the ice cap was then laid out and 6 tons of ice cap station supplies were hauled to the top of a 1000-foot plateau at the beginning of that route. ... It was decided to cache the supplies at the edge of the plateau and to establish the ice cap station in the spring of 1961, when the ground will be frozen. ... The archaeologists located two previously unknown sites. The first, in the vicinity of the base camp, includes four or five houses, three temporary houses, and several caches. It is probably a late Thule site. The second site is located near the western tip of Cape Sparbo and has been tentatively named the "Inapok" site. It ... includes 9 houses tent rings, and a number of other structures. There are undoubtedly both Dorset and Thule, and perhaps pre-Dorset elements in the site. The entire site is well preserved and has yielded about 90 artifacts including Dorset blades, microblade points, burins, microburins, burin spalls, knives, and end blades. Oliver continued his study of arctic chironomids and other aquatic insects by extensive collecting at Resolute and on Devon Island. Harington measured over 60 musk ox skulls and made a comprehensive plant collection. The Devon Island Station will be reoccupied in late April 1961, at which time the ice cap station will be established. Studies in meteorology, glaciology, oceanography, marine biology, and geology will then begin. The archaeological work will continue with a detailed excavation of the "Inapok" site and further reconnaissance of the island. (Au)

V, M, U, I, H
Animal collections; Aquatic insects; Artifacts; Biological sampling; Bones; Chironomidae; Dorset culture; Equipment and supplies; Expeditions; Inuit archaeology; Logistics; Measurement; Muskoxen; Plant collections; Portable buildings; Prefabrication; Research stations; Thule culture

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Jones Sound region, Nunavut; Resolute, Nunavut; Skogn, Cape, Nunavut; Sparbo, Cape, region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The chlorophyll content of Arctic sea-ice   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 14, no. 3, Sept. 1961, p. 197-200)
References.
ASTIS record 50877.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic14-3-197.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3674
Libraries: ACU

A number of observers, working in arctic and antarctic waters, have commented on the discoloration of sea-ice caused by unicellular algae, mainly diatoms, that are frozen into the ice. The discoloration is usually seen when the ice is broken and over turned, because it occurs principally on the lower surface of the ice and occasionally on its sides. The brown or greenish-brown colour is due to the chloroplasts in the algae and undoubtedly indicates the presence of a potential source of food in polar seas in addition to the phytoplankton and the benthic algae. The algae associated with the ice present interesting problems concerning the adaptation of protoplasm to life under conditions of low temperatures (maximum about -1.68C.) and of the adaptation of photosynthetic activity to low light intensities. Although they have been frequently observed, these algae have been very little studied, partly on account of collecting difficulties. Investigations of algae frozen into sea-ice have been started at the Devon Island station (75 42'N.) of the Arctic Institute and some preliminary results are reported here. ... (Au)

H, G

G0815
Jones Sound, Nunavut


The Devon Island Expedition   /   Apollonio, S.   Cowie, J.W.   Voegtli, K.   Koerner, R.M.   Cress, P.   Wyness, R.   Greenhouse, J.P.
(Arctic, v. 14, no. 4, Dec. 1961, p. 252-265, ill.)
Reference.
ASTIS record 50882.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic14-4-252.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3683
Libraries: ACU

In 1959 the Arctic Institute of North America undertook an integrated program of long term research on Devon Island in the Queen Elizabeth Islands of arctic Canada. The co-ordinated studies were designed to help understand the interrelationships between the glacier ice of Devon Island, the ocean in Jones Sound, and the encompassing atmosphere. They are being carried out over a 3-year period under the leadership of Spencer Apollonio. The main effort is concentrated on attempts to evaluate such factors as physical, chemical, and biological variations in the arctic waters of Jones Sound caused by discharging glaciers; evaporation and transfer of moisture between the ocean waters and the ice-cap and glaciers; and the overall influences of solar radiation energy on the mass balance of the ice-cap, the biological production in the sea, and the growth and decay of sea-ice. Some supplementary studies in archaeology and geology are included in the expedition's work because of the marked deficiency of knowledge in those subjects for Devon Island. In the late summer of 1960 a main base was established on the north shore of Devon Island near Cape Skogn by an advance party of eight men taken in with their materials by the Canada Department of Transport icebreaker "d'Iberville". During a 3-week period buildings were erected and routes inland and to the ice-cap explored and marked, while an archaeological reconnaissance of the Cape Sparbo area was made by a small party under Mr. Gordon Lowther of McGill University. Everything was installed for a beginning of the 3-year program in April 1961. During the months of April to September 1961 21 men worked on extensive programs in geophysics, glaciology, marine biology and oceanography, meteorology, and surveying. Intensive work was also completed in archaeology and geology. ... (Au)

F, A, G, B, F, D, C, I, U

G0813, G0815
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut; Sparbo, Cape, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


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