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The ASTIS database cites the following 16 publication(s) by Karen McCullough. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Late Thule culture developments on the central east coast of Ellesmere Island   /   Schledermann, P.   McCullough, K.M.
Copenhagen : Danish Polar Center, 2003.
203 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
(Danish Polar Center publication, no. 12)
Appendices.
Bibliography: p. 200-203.
ASTIS record 53079.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This monograph is the third and final presentation of research data covering the prehistoric occupations on the central east coast of Ellesmere Island. As was the case for the Palaeoeskimo hunters and the pioneering Neoeskimos, the Post-Ruin Island and Late Thule culture Inuit used the Bache Peninsula region extensively both summer and winter until environmental, ecological and possibly social circumstances caused the area to be abandoned. It was the last region in the Canadian High Arctic to be depopulated during the "Little Ice Age," attesting to its general economic importance as part of the Smith Sound culture sphere of which it was occasionally a part and sometimes the principal settlement component. (Au)

U, T, V, D, E
Artifacts; Bones; Burial practices; Climate change; Culture (Anthropology); Equipment and supplies; Ethnography; Expeditions; Explorers; Houses; Human migration; Hunting; Inuit archaeology; Palaeoeskimo culture; Polar Eskimos; Polynyas; Radiocarbon dating; Social change; Thule culture; Transportation

G0813, G10, G09
Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Goding Bay region, Nunavut; Inglefield Bredning region, Greenland; Inglefield Land, Greenland; Johan Peninsula, Nunavut; Knud Peninsula, Nunavut; Nordgrønland; Pim Island, Nunavut; Smith Sound region, Greenland/Nunavut; Smith Sound, Greenland/Nunavut


Inuit-Norse contact in the Smith Sound region   /   Schledermann, P.   McCullough, K.M.
(Contact, continuity, and collapse : the Norse colonization of the North Atlantic / Edited by James H. Barrett. Studies in the early middle ages, v. 5, 2003, p. 183-205, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 52056.
Languages: English

... In this chapter we consider the types of Norse artefacts found in Thule culture sites on the central coast of Ellesmere Island and in North Greenland and assess the nature of possible Inuit-Norse contact in the Far North. ... The identifiable Norse finds located in Ruin Island phase winter dwellings on the central east coast of Ellesmere Island and in North Greenland can be viewed as supporting at least three culture contact scenarios: 1) direct contact - possibly trade related, between pioneering Inuit groups and exploring Norsemen; 2) indirect contact - the presence of both pioneering Inuit and exploring Norsemen in the Far North not involving face-to-face contact, the Norse artefacts being obtained by Inuit from one or more abandoned Norse camps or possibly a shipwreck; 3) no Norse presence in the Far North - all the Norse artefacts were derived from trade between Inuit groups living south and north of Melville Bay. Of these scenarios we strongly favour the first two, both involving an actual Norse presence in the Far North. The Norse finds from Ruin Island and Skraeling Island appear to be the result of a single contact event, direct or indirect. Matching items from the two sites include pieces of woven cloth, chain mail, draughts-men, spear points, and industrial copper. But was there direct contact? ... (Au)

U
Artifacts; Cairns; Copper; Homesteading; Houses; Human migration; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Iron; Lumber; Norse; Norse in Greenland; Shipwrecks; Social interaction; Thule culture; Trade and barter

G0813, G10, G09
Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Kane Basin, Greenland/Nunavut; Nordgrønland; Ruin Island, Greenland; Skraeling Island, Nunavut; Smith Sound region, Greenland/Nunavut; Smith Sound, Greenland/Nunavut


Mystery cairns of Washington Irving Island   /   McCullough, K.   Schledermann, P.
(Polar record, v. 35, no.195, Oct. 1999, p. 289-298, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 45778.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1017/S0032247400015643
Libraries: ACU

In 1875, members of the British Arctic Expedition under the command of George S. Nares discovered two ancient-looking cairns on Washington Irving Island at the entrance to Dobbin Bay, eastern Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada. At least one of these cairns was destroyed by the expedition members to construct their own cairn. The possibility that these cairns were built by Norse voyagers to Kane Basin is supported by the large number of Norse artifacts recovered from Thule culture Inuit sites in the Bache Peninsula region just south of Washington Irving Island. Surveys of the island have identified scattered boulders marking the location of the cairns, but the question of the builders' identity still remains a mystery. (Au)

V, U
Artifacts; Cairns; Expeditions; History; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Nares, Sir George Strong, 1831-1915; Norse; Rocks; Royal Canadian Mounted Police; Thule culture

G0813
Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Washington Irving Island, Nunavut


Under siege : journal publishing in the 1990s   /   McCullough, K.M.
(Arctic, v. 48, no. 2, June 1995, p. iii-iv)
ASTIS record 35742.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic48-2-iii.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1231
Libraries: ACU

Budget cutbacks are the theme of the '90s, and all aspects of advanced education are under intense pressure from severely reduced federal and provincial funding. The realm of scholarly communication is no exception. At a time of rising production costs, reduced postal subsidies, and subscription cancellations from under-funded university libraries, publishers of scholarly journals are now faced with the outright elimination of funding sources such as the Scientific Publication Grants Program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). According to NSERC, the support of scientific journals is a "non-core program" and is therefore being terminated to allow more funding to be directed to research grants. It is difficult to understand how the dissemination of knowledge came to be defined as a non-core program. The goal of ensuring adequate funds for the direct costs of conducting research is certainly laudable. Nevertheless, the loss, through inadequate funding, of scholarly journals as a major forum for scientists to communicate the results of their work has serious consequences for the entire scientific endeavour. There is little point in funding research that will remain unknown to the broader academic community and to Canadian tax-payers who support that community. Such a move could easily result in the research being available only to a privileged few (relatively speaking) through informal networks of communication such as the Internet. ... The move to on-line publishing may somewhat ease the budgetary pressures on journal support programs and university libraries as more and more new journals are offered directly in the electronic media rather than in print. ... Until such time as the print journal has disappeared, publishers will continue to seek ways to make the production process as efficient and cost-effective as possible, while maintaining the quality and integrity of scholarly journals. ... Fiscally responsible journal management means maintaining subscriber rates that will cover the costs of production and distribution. But we need to look elsewhere to cover the myriad other costs associated with scholarly publishing. ... (Au)

L
Finance; Government; Publishing; Research; Research funding; Serials; World Wide Web

G08
Canada


Geological, archaeological, and historical occurrences of coal, east-central Ellesmere Island, arctic Canada   /   Kalkreuth, W.D.   McCullough, K.M.   Richardson, R.J.H.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 25, no. 4, Nov. 1993, p. 277-307, ill. (some col.), maps)
References.
ASTIS record 36823.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1551913
Libraries: ACU

Coal, once widely distributed over most of east-central Ellesmere Island, is only present in restricted outcrops of Eureka Sound Group sediments that survive in the Bache Peninsula Graben (BPG) on eastern Bache Peninsula. The discovery of coals similar to those of Bache Peninsula in modern moraine sediments at the Jewell, Leffert, and Alfred Newton glaciers on Johan Peninsula to the south, provide evidence that (1) the Eureka Sound Group was more extensive in the past and is present today beneath modern glaciers and (2) the glaciers are likely filling grabens similar to the BPG. Twelve samples of coal were recovered from Thule culture house ruins dating from the 12th to 17th centuries A.D. Four samples have huminite reflectance levels and compositional features of lignites, and most likely originated in nearby seams of the Tertiary Eureka Sound Group. The remaining eight pieces were either boghead coal, cannel shale, or jet materials that are as yet unknown in the Eureka Sound Group coal-bearing strata. There is no evidence that coal was burned by the early native peoples. At the turn of the century exploration of the area and quest for the North Pole saw the importation of coal into the area from Nova Scotia. Many references to coal can be found in journals and other literature from the period, and its use was an important element in the exploration period. ... The R.C.M.P. manned a post on Bache Peninsula from 1926 to 1933 and later at Alexandra Fiord (until 1962). The coal, used for cooking and heating, was purchased from a company that imported high rank (anthracite) coal from Wales. Samples of coals from the two posts and a way-station at Rice Strait are very different from both the local and the Nova Scotia coals in terms of rank. (Au)

B, V, P, U
Adornment; Artifacts; Coal; Exploration; Explorers; History; Houses; Inuit archaeology; Mining; Moraines; Petrography; Petrology; Spatial distribution; Tertiary period; Thule culture

G0813, G03
Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; North Pole; Skraeling Island, Nunavut


Nunavut ("Our Land")   /   Dickerson, M.O.   McCullough, K.M.
(Information north, v. 19, no. 2, June 1993, p. 1-6, map, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 32694.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Legislation to ratify the Inuit land claim and to create Canada's third territory, Nunavut, has been introduced in the present session of Parliament. The following provides a brief historical account of the creation of Nunavut and basic information on the Agreement-in-Principle and the region. ... (Au)

R, T
Creation of Nunavut; Economic conditions; Government; History; Native land claims; Nunavut Land Claims Agreement

G0813
Nunavut


Thule pioneers in the Canadian Arctic   /   Arnold, C.D.   McCullough, K.M.
In: Canada's missing dimension : Science and history in the Canadian Arctic Islands / Edited by C.R. Harington. - Ottawa : Canadian Museum of Nature, 1990, v. 2, p. 677-694, ill., 1 map
References.
ASTIS record 36822.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Archaeological investigations on Banks Island in the western Canadian Arctic and on Ellesmere Island in the east have revealed evidence for pioneering groups of Thule Inuit in each of those areas. The Banks Island occupation represents the initial expansion of Thule into the Canadian Arctic, and the sites on Ellesmere Island contain archaeological remains of a later group that migrated eastward from Alaska. These data show the complex nature of processes involved in the prehistoric development of Inuit culture. (Au)

U
Bones; Food; Houses; Human migration; Inuit archaeology; Thule culture

G0813, G0812
Banks Island, N.W.T.; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut


Editorial : on editorials!   /   McCullough, K.
(Arctic, v. 42, no. 4, Dec. 1989, p. iii-iv)
ASTIS record 49674.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic42-4-iii.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1669
Libraries: ACU

Given today's exciting and rapidly evolving developments in the Canadian North, the practice of masthead editorials was initiated to provide some degree of topicality to the multidisciplinary journal Arctic. This practice has resulted, much to our delight, in a substantial increase in letters to the editor - some commending and others strongly disagreeing with the trenchant and thought-provoking ideas put forth in the editorials. An editorial is an opinion piece or proposal written by an individual or group of individuals who wish to express a particular viewpoint on an issue of current relevance. The masthead editorial in Arctic is specifically designed to promote feedback from the readership and encourage our members to actively participate in the scholarly debate of important events and issues affecting the North now and in the future. A more active participation by the members through guest editorials and letters to the editors can only serve to enhance the value of and interest in the journal. ... (Au)

X, I, A, V, T
Arctic Institute of North America; Communication; Publishing; Research; Serials

G081
Canadian Arctic


The Ellesmere Island research project final report on the 1988 field season   /   McCullough, K.M.   Schledermann, P.
[Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America], 1989.
viii, 82 leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Limited distribution.
Copies available from Archaeological Survey of Canada, Canadian Museum of Civilization.
References.
ASTIS record 29375.
Languages: English

A brief one-day survey of the Goding Bay area ... during the 1987 field season had provided evidence of extensive prehistoric activity in the region with numerous sites showing good potential for further archaeological research (Schledermann and McCullough 1988). The primary objective of the 1988 field season was to survey and record all of the archaeological resources in the Goding Bay area. Much of the work involved counting and mapping site features with some testing of selected features, particularly the Thule culture winter house ruins, to determine organic preservation conditions. The recording of all sites pertaining to the Arctic Small Tool tradition (ASTt) and Thule culture periods is a necessary first step before specific culture historical and cultural/ecological concerns can be addressed. ... (Au)

U
Arctic Small Tool tradition; Human migration; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Thule culture

G0813
Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Faraday, Cape, Nunavut; Goding Bay region, Nunavut; Skraeling Island, Nunavut


Thule culture prehistory on the east coast of Ellesmere Island   /   McCullough, K.M.
(Information north, v. 15, no. 7, Sept. 1989, p. 1-3, ill., map)
ASTIS record 29335.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

One of the major objectives of the archaeological research conducted on Ellesmere Island by Schledermann and McCullough has been to discover the lifeways and cultural relationships of the earliest Thule-culture people of the region. The author describes the artifacts unearthed by this team since their earliest excavations dating back to 1977, and the insights they have gained about this culture through their continued work on Ellesmere Island. (ASTIS)

U
Inuit archaeology; Thule culture

G0813
Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut


The Ruin Islanders : Thule culture pioneers in the eastern High Arctic   /   McCullough, K.M.
Hull, Quebec : Canadian Museum of Civilization, 1989.
xviii, 347 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Paper - Archaeological Survey of Canada, no. 141)
(Mercury series)
ISBN 0-660-10793-7
Appendix.
Bibliography: p. 305-325.
ASTIS record 28996.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... Recent archaeological research in the Bache Peninsula region of eastern Ellesmere Island, N.W.T. has produced a substantial amount of data relating to this poorly-defined phase of Thule culture. The Skraeling Island, Sverdrup, Eskimobyen and Thule Meadows sites contained thirty winter house ruins which were completely excavated or tested, producing over 4500 artifacts and almost 20,000 animal bones relating to the Ruin Island phase. Seventeen radiocarbon assessments suggest a late 12th or early 13th century A.D. period for the Ruin Island phase, which now appears to be the initial Thule culture occupation of the Smith Sound region. A comparative analysis of selected traits with Alaskan Neo-Eskimo cultures and early Thule culture sites in the Canadian Arctic indicates that the phase is most closely affiliated with Punuk-influenced, early Western Thule sites in Western Alaska, suggesting that the latter area, rather than North Alaska, was the probable source area for the Ruin Island phase. The relatively late dates as compared to early Thule sites in the Barrow Strait/Lancaster Sound region suggest that the Ruin Island phase represents only one of several Thule migrations from Alaska into the Canadian Arctic. The analysis of the faunal remains demonstrates a subsistence emphasis on sea mammals, particularly ringed seals which were hunted during the spring and fall seasons. The concentration of food resources in the polynyas was a significant factor in the attraction of the Bache Peninsula region as a settlement locale during the early Thule period. (Au)

U
Artifacts; Culture (Anthropology); Human migration; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Origin of peoples; Sealing; Subsistence; Thule culture

G0813, G10, G06
Alaska, Northern; Alaska, Northwestern; Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Ruin Island, Greenland; Vestgrønland


The Ellesmere Island research project final report on the 1987 field season   /   Schledermann, P.   McCullough, K.M.
[Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America], 1988.
vi, 66 leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Limited distribution.
Copies available from Archaeological Survey of Canada, Canadian Museum of Civilization.
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 29374.
Languages: English

The 1987 field research of the Ellesmere Island Research Project was designed with two primary objectives in mind; the first relating to Arctic Small Tool tradition (ASTt) occupations in the Bache Peninsula region of eastern Ellesmere Island ... and the second focussing on prehistoric settlement in the Goding Bay area to the south .... Between 1977 and 1982, extensive archaeological investigations in the Bache Peninsula region had resulted in the discovery of over 250 sites relating to ASTt, Thule culture, and historic period occupations. The analysis of data from over 30 excavated ASTt sites led to the formulation of several specific questions concerning ASTt settlement patterns and the value of using beach ridges as relative chronological indicators during the early ASTt occupation of the Bache Peninsula region. In particular, we wanted to test for contemporaneity between the two main types of ASTt camp features - the slab and boulder constructed axial dwellings located on more sheltered lower beach terraces, and the more amorphous 'scatter' features consisting of poorly defined tent ring outlines or single hearths which were built on exposed upper beach terraces. ... (Au)

U
Arctic Small Tool tradition; Beaches; Human migration; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Thule culture

G0813
Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Goding Bay region, Nunavut; Johan Peninsula, Nunavut; Knud Peninsula, Nunavut; Skraeling Island, Nunavut; Thorvald Peninsula, Nunavut


Thule Eskimos and Vikings on eastern Ellesmere Island, N.W.T.   /   McCullough, K.M.
(Ottawa archaeologist, v. 15, no. 5, May 1988, p. 6-13, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 29362.
Languages: English

... Skraeling Island was visited by a team of archaeologists from the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary, who were there to study ... ancient house ruins and learn about the way of life of the prehistoric Eskimo hunters who lived there. At each end of Skraeling Island lies a large winter settlement belonging to people of the Thule culture ... the direct ancestors of the historic Inuit. ... [Thule culture house ruins and associated artifacts are described.] (Au)

U, V
Inuit archaeology; Norse; Thule culture

G0813, G11
Greenland; Skraeling Island, Nunavut


Neo-Eskimo diet and hunting strategies on eastern Ellesmere Island, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   McCullough, K.M.
In: Diet and subsistence : current archaeological perspectives : proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary / Edited by B.V. Kennedy and G.M. LeMoine. - Calgary, Alta. : Archaeological Association, 1988, p. 190-206, ill., maps
References.
ASTIS record 29361.
Languages: English

A major objective of the Ellesmere Island Research Project was to reassess the chronological position and cultural relationships of the enigmatic Ruin Island phase of early Thule culture in the eastern High Arctic. This objective was achieved through the analysis of data from several Ruin Island-related winter house ruins in the Bache Peninsula region of eastern Ellesmere Island, Northwest Territories .... Our research has shown that the Ruin Island phase represents the initial Thule culture occupation of the Smith Sound region and that this occupation occurred during the late twelfth or early thirteenth centuries A.D. ... In addition to providing data of cultural-historical significance, the excavated Ruin Island phase winter houses produced an assemblage of almost 20,000 animal bones which were analyzed in an attempt to determine the nature of early Thule culture resource utilization and hunting strategies in the study region. In order to reconstruct as complete a picture as possible of Ruin Island phase subsistence practices, the faunal remains were interpreted through analogy to observations in early historical and ethnographic accounts of Polar Eskimo lifeways during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries A.D. ... (Au)

U
Ethnography; Food; Hunting; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Neoeskimo culture; Subsistence; Thule culture

G0813
Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Skraeling Island, Nunavut


The Ruin Island phase of Thule culture in the eastern High Arctic   /   McCullough, K.M.
Toronto : University of Toronto, 1986.
xviii, 561 leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., 1986.
Appendix.
Bibliography: p. 529-556.
ASTIS record 18766.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Ruin Island phase of Thule culture was initially defined by Erik Holtved (1944) as an intrusive, secondary movement of Neo-Eskimo groups from the Bering Sea region to Northwest Greenland at approximately A.D. 1300. ... Recent archaeological research in the Bache Peninsula region of eastern Ellesmere Island, N.W.T. has produced a substantial amount of data relating to this poorly-defined phase of Thule culture. The Skraeling Island, Sverdrup, Eskimobyen and Thule Meadows sites contained thirty winter house ruins which were completely excavated or tested, producing over 4,500 artifacts and almost 20,000 animal bones relating to the Ruin Island phase. Seventeen radiocarbon assessments suggest a late 12th or early 13th century A.D. period for the Ruin Island phase, which now appears to be the initial Thule culture occupation of the Smith Sound region. A comparative analysis of selected traits with Alaskan Neo-Eskimo cultures and early Thule culture sites in the Canadian Arctic indicates that the phase is most closely affiliated with Punuk-influenced, early Western Thule sites in Western Alaska, suggesting that the latter area, rather than North Alaska, was the probable source area for the Ruin Island phase. The relatively late dates as compared to early Thule sites in the Barrow Strait/Lancaster Sound region suggest that the Ruin Island phase represents only one of several Thule migrations from Alaska into the Canadian Arctic. The analysis of the faunal remains demonstrates a subsistence emphasis on sea mammals, particularly ringed seals which were hunted during the spring and fall seasons. The concentration of food resources in the polynyas was a significant factor in the attraction of the Bache Peninsula region as a settlement locale during the early Thule period. (Au)

U
Artifacts; Culture (Anthropology); Human migration; Inuit; Sealing; Subsistence; Theses; Thule culture

G0813, G10, G06
Alaska, Northern; Alaska, Northwestern; Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Ruin Island, Greenland; Skraeling Island, Nunavut; Vestgrønland


Western elements in the early Thule culture of the eastern High Arctic   /   Schledermann, P.   McCullough, K.M.
(Arctic, v. 33, no. 4, Dec. 1980, p. 833-841, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 6018.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic33-4-833.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2599
Libraries: ACU

Excavations of Thule culture winter sites in the Bache Peninsula region on the east coast of Ellesmere Island have yielded a number of finds which indicate a strong relationship to cultural developments in the Bering Sea region. Specific elements under discussion include dwelling styles, clay pottery, needle cases, a brow band and harpoon heads. Evidence is presented suggesting an initial arrival of the Thule culture Inuit in the eastern Arctic around 1050 A.D. (Au)

U
Archaeology; Pottery; Thule culture

G0813
Bache Peninsula region, Nunavut; Skraeling Island, Nunavut


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