AINA Logo
Publications

 

The ASTIS database cites the following 21 publication(s) by Magdalena Muir. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Motivating research on the science communications front : conveying the nature and impacts of rapid change in ice-dominated earth systems to decision makers and the public   /   Vörösmarty, C.J. [Editor]   Davídsson, P.A. [Editor]   Muir, M.A.K. [Editor]   Sandford, R.W. [Editor]
Arlington, Virginia : National Science Foundation, 2015.
48 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
References.
ASTIS record 82560.
Languages: English
Web: http://geo-prose.com/pdfs/motivating_research_high.pdf

Executive summary: ... The workshop's primary goal was to execute a critical initial assessment of how scientific knowledge is transferred into the public awareness and policy domains. The objective of this report is to synthesize the workshop dialogue and to provide specific advice to the National Science Foundation (NSF) on future research opportunities and investments that could be made in the theoretical and applied aspects of the process of science communication with regard to climate change, using the example of the rapidly changing cryosphere. Here, we provide the group's consensus advice on future research investments in this domain. We emphasize that the workshop was not devoted to the science of ice, snow, and water per se but instead to science communication on a changing cryosphere. Participants in the two events provide in this report their collective advice on future research investments in this domain. ... (Au)

E, F, G, C, D, R
Climate change; Environmental policy; Glaciers; Government; Ice caps; Ice sheets; Methane; Permafrost; Research; Science; Sea ice; Sea level; Snow; Thawing

G02
Arctic regions


Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the circumpolar Arctic   /   Muir, M.A.K.
(Arctic, v. 63, no. 3, Sept. 2010, p. 373-378, maps)
References.
ASTIS record 71242.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic63-3-373.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1509
Libraries: ACU

... In this essay, I explore several northern fisheries to examine various IUU [illegal, unreported, and unregulated] fishing scenarios for the Arctic: commercial fishing in the Canadian and U.S. Beaufort Sea, the offshore halibut fishery adjacent to the Nunavut Territory of Canada, and the Irminger Sea redfish fishery in the Reykjanes Ridge of the North Atlantic. I then consider current regulatory regimes for IUU fisheries in Antarctica and Europe, which provide potential models for Arctic fisheries. ... Potential illegal, unreported, and unregulated fisheries in the circumpolar Arctic could take several forms. As discussed earlier, these problematic fisheries might arise through international boundary disputes, internal conflicts, or inappropriate fishing in national and international waters. The IUU fishing regimes for Antarctica and Europe provide models for addressing such fisheries in the circumpolar Arctic. The Antarctic model under CCAMLR [Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources], which is the most longstanding approach to IUU fisheries, reflects the overlapping international claims in the Southern Ocean and the importance of that ocean for fishing. The EU [European Union] approach is similar to CCAMLR, but also includes restrictions on consumption of IUU fish within European and national markets. In the Arctic, there are eight circumpolar nations with existing Exclusive Economic Zones. The future continental shelf extensions under UNCLOS [United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea], if approved, will extend to most of the Arctic Ocean, and provide significant resource use and management rights to these nations for the seabed and overlying waters. These Arctic nations, which include Canada and the United States, the Scandinavian countries, and Russia, are also major importers and consumers of fish. Therefore it might be useful to include a consideration of the consumption of IUU fish in their national approaches. Both the Antarctic and EU models for IUU fisheries can provide good examples for circum-Arctic approaches. Combined with efforts of regional fishing organizations and conventions and consumer awareness of sustainable fishery certifications, these Arctic approaches could help to minimize the risks of future IUU fisheries. As fish stocks move northward, and commercial fisheries develop, these national and regional approaches could also be formalized in a broader regional agreement for fisheries in the Arctic Ocean. (Au)

R, N, T
Boundaries; Fish management; Fisheries; Fisheries law; Fishing; Foreign relations; Geopolitics; Gwich'in Indians; Inuit; Subsistence; Treaties; United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea

G02, G03, G07, G11, G09
Arctic Ocean; Arctic waters; Baffin Bay-Davis Strait; Beaufort Sea; North Atlantic Ocean


Challenges and opportunities for marine deposits of methane hydrate in the circumpolar Arctic polar region   /   Muir, M.A.K.
(Integrating energy and climate security in law and policy. Retfærd, 32, nr. 3/126, 2009, p. 61-71, ill., map)
References.
ASTIS record 74823.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Marine deposits of methane hydrates in the Arctic represent significant climate risks as well as an energy resources, and their exploitation should be regulated consistently throughout the Arctic. Most importantly, Arctic methane hydrates could strongly influence the global climate if they are released into the general atmosphere. Despite their inaccessible location and unstable chemical structure, with the development of further technology, Arctic methane hydrates could become a significant energy resource. The article reviews the climate risk associated with Arctic methane hydrates, and the potential exploitation of Arctic methane hydrates. Possible guidelines and approaches for the exploration and production of marine deposits of methane hydrates in the Arctic are suggested. (Au)

E, Q, R
Bottom sediments; Climate change; Continental shelves; Energy policy; Energy resources; Environmental policy; Gas hydrates; Government regulations; Government relations; International law; Law; Methane; Offshore oil well drilling; Risk assessment; Sovereignty

G02, G081, G08
Arctic waters; Canada; Canadian Arctic


Hydrocarbon development and maritime shipping for the circumpolar Arctic in the context of the Arctic Council and climate change   /   Muir, M.A.K.
(Sustainable development law & policy, v. 8, no. 3, Spring 2008, p. 38-39, 66)
References.
ASTIS record 64618.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... One of the consequences of climate change for the Arctic is the greater opportunity for hydrocarbon development and maritime shipping. ... Arctic societies are resilient in response to change. Today they are facing an unprecedented combination of rapid and stressful changes involving environmental forces like climate change and socioeconomic pressures associated with global and regional development. At the same time, this report recognizes that the Arctic has become a leader in the development of innovative political and legal arrangements, including co-management regimes governing the use of natural resources, collaborative arrangements designed to facilitate cooperation between public governments and indigenous peoples organizations and trans-national arrangements like the Northern Forum and the Arctic Council itself. These regimes will also apply to hydrocarbon development and maritime shipping. Circum-arctic assessments of hydrocarbon development and marine shipping are now occurring .... Two of these assessments, the Arctic Oil and Gas Assessment and the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment ("AMSA"), will be completed for the end of 2008, and are briefly reviewed in this Article. ... Key findings of the Arctic Oil and Gas Assessment are that extensive oil and gas activity has occurred in the Arctic, with much oil and gas produced and much remaining to be produced. Natural seeps are the major source of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the Arctic environment and petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations are generally low. On land, physical disturbance is the largest effect. In marine environments, oil spills are the largest threat. The impacts on individuals, communities, and governments can be both positive and negative. Human health can suffer from oil and gas pollution and social disruption, but revenues can improve health care and overall well-being. Technology and regulations can help reduce negative impacts, but responding to major oil spills remains a challenge in remote, icy environments. For the future, more oil and gas activity is expected, and many risks remain. However, planning and monitoring can help reduce risks and impacts. ... The [Arctic Marine Shipping] assessment reviews existing marine shipping and projected marine shipping for 2020 and 2050. The assessment will also include a discussion of the environmental, social and environmental impact on present maritime activity and will project future activity. Last, the assessment will provide analysis and recommendations. ... The combination of all these documents and datasets will facilitate a coherent approach to Arctic shipping and any development of regional or circum-arctic shipping, such as the Northeast or Northwest Passage. ... This Article has very briefly reviewed assessments of hydrocarbon activity and marine shipping in the context of the Arctic Council and climate change. These assessments are part of an ongoing and extensive program of action of the Council, and will conclude by 2008. Like the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment Scientific Report, each assessment will conclude but also contain the seeds of their continuance. These assessments form the groundwork of integrated approaches to hydrocarbon development and maritime shipping that may be national, regional, circum-Arctic, or global. They also illustrate some of the unique approaches to resource management that are evolving in the Arctic. Parties interested in Arctic resource development and its management should follow these assessments, and related activities of the Arctic Council and its working groups through the websites and related news services and feeds. (Au)

J, E, Q, L, R, T
Arctic Council; Climate change; Economic development; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Forecasting; Government regulations; Marine oil spills; Marine transportation; Native organizations; Oil seeps; Petroleum industry; Planning; Pollution; Pollution control; Socio-economic effects

G02, G0815, G07, G141
Arctic regions; Northwest Passage; Russian Arctic waters


Projet sur les changements climatiques dans la mer de Beaufort : stratégie de communication avec les collectivités au sujet des polluants   /   Muir, M.A.K.   Shea, J.A.
In: Programme de lutte contre les contaminants dans le Nord : Symposium sur l'évaluation des contaminants dans l'Arctique canadien, résumés étendu, Ottawa : March 4-7, 2003. - [Ottawa : Indian and Northern Affairs Canada], 2003, [1] p.
References.
Extended abstract of a poster presentation (P-C01).
ASTIS record 62864 describes the French extended abstracts volume from the Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Symposium.
ASTIS record 59482 describes the English version of this abstract.
ASTIS record 63119.
Languages: French
Libraries: ACU

La présentation analyse certaines stratégies de communication avec diverses collectivités et intérêts au sujet de l'action réciproque entre les changements climatiques et les polluants. Les méthodes de gestion intégrée et les systèmes d'information géographique (SIG) serviront d'outils pour discuter des effets des changements climatiques sur les poissons et les mammifères marins et de la gestion de ces effets dans la mer de Beaufort au Canada. La présentation explorera de façon graphique et écrite comment la gestion intégrée de la zone littorale et l'analyse par SIG peuvent servir à comprendre et à communiquer aux divers intérêts et collectivités les effets du changement climatique et des polluants sur cette région, et à démontrer des mécanismes et des stratégies d'adaptation. Les collectivités et intérêts en question comprennent le Comité mixte de gestion de la pêche; les institutions et processus établis en vertu de la Convention définitive avec les Inuvialuit; les collectivités locales; les gouvernements régionaux et territoriaux et le gouvernement fédéral; l'industrie; et les organisations non gouvernementales. Diverses approches de gestion intégrée et techniques de SIG seront utilisées pour développer des stratégies de communication avec ces diverses collectivités et intérêts. La présentation et la recherche correspondante font partie intégrale du Projet sur les changements climatiques dans la mer de Beaufort. Le financement et l'appui en nature pour ce projet sont fournis par le Fonds d'action pour le changement climatique, le Comité mixte de gestion de la pêche, l'Institut arctique de l'Amérique du Nord, et le Département de géographie de l'Université de Calgary. Cette recherche est entreprise avec le soutien actif et la coopération du Comité mixte de gestion de la pêche. (Au)

J, E, I, N, R, T, L
Adaptation (Biology); Climate change; Communication; Environmental impacts; Fisheries Joint Management Committee (Canada); Fishes; Geographic information systems; Government; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Marine mammals; Native organizations; Planning; Pollution; Wildlife management

G07
Canadian Beaufort Sea


Beaufort Sea Project for Climate Change : community consultation strategy for contaminants issues   /   Muir, M.A.K.   Shea, J.A.
In: Northern Contaminants Program : Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Symposium, extended abstracts, Ottawa : March 4-7, 2003. - [Ottawa : Indian and Northern Affairs Canada], 2003, [1] p.
References.
Extended abstract of a poster presentation (P-C01).
ASTIS record 51068 describes the English extended abstracts volume from the Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Symposium.
ASTIS record 63119 describes the French version of this abstract.
ASTIS record 59482.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The poster presentation discusses strategies for communicating with communities and interest about the interaction between climate change and contaminants. Integrated management approaches and geographical information systems (GIS) environments will be used as tools to discuss the impacts of climate change for fish and marine mammals, and their management in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. In the poster presentation, there will be a graphical and print exploration of how integrated coastal zone management and GIS analysis can be used to understand and communicate impacts of climate change and contaminants for this region to diverse interests and communities, and to model adaptive mechanisms and strategies. Communities and interests include the Fisheries Joint Management Committee; institutions and processes established under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement; local communities; regional and territorial and federal governments; industry; and non-governmental organizations. Various integrated management approaches and GIS techniques and environments will be used to develop strategies to communicate with these diverse communities and interests. The poster presentation and related research are occurring under the Beaufort Sea Project for Climate Change. Funding and in-kind support for the Project is provided by the Climate Change Adaptation Fund, the Fisheries Joint Management Committee, the Arctic Institute of North America, and the University of Calgary Department of Geography. This research is being implemented with the active support and cooperation of the Fisheries Joint Management Committee. (Au)

J, E, I, N, R, T, L
Adaptation (Biology); Climate change; Communication; Environmental impacts; Fisheries Joint Management Committee (Canada); Fishes; Geographic information systems; Government; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Marine mammals; Native organizations; Planning; Pollution; Wildlife management

G07
Canadian Beaufort Sea


Integrated coastal and marine management in northern regions : reconciling economic development and conservation   /   Muir, M.A.K.
(International Coastal Symposium (ICS 2002) / Edited by J.A.G. Cooper and D.W.T. Jackson. Journal of coastal research. Special issue, no. 36, Fall 2002, p. 522-530)
References.
Also available on the Web.
ASTIS record 61377.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.science.ulst.ac.uk/ics2002/contents.html
Libraries: ACU

There will be increasing pressure on northern coastal and offshore regions for resource extraction as resources become scarce in more accessible regions. Marine navigation and transportation is likely to increase in response to economic development, and as ice cover reduces and the ice free season extends as a result of climatic changes. This article considers how economic development within northern coastal and marine regions may be reconciled with conservation. Integrated coastal management may be a successful process to reconcile economic development and conservation values. Existing, developing and de facto approaches to integrated management for northern coastal and marine regions are examined in the context of scenarios for economic development and conservation. These scenarios include marine shipping and hydrocarbon exploration and production for coastal and offshore waters of Alaska, northern Canada, and the North Sea. These approaches to integrated management are one means of considering marine resources and their utilization with a sustainable development framework. These approaches may also be a means of reconciling marine protection and other sectors such as shipping, hydrocarbons and fisheries. The article concludes that approaches to integrated management which reconcile economic and conservation values will be complex and consultative. The approach will need to consider the interests of local peoples and communities, the needs of ecosystems and migratory communities, and environmental impacts and mitigation of development. The success of different approaches for reconciling economic development and conservation may be gauged by the range of issues and interests considered in these processes. (Au)

D, N, R, L, G, E, J, Q, S, T, I
Aircraft disturbance; Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan; Beluga whales; Birds; Climate change; Co-management; Economic development; Environmental impacts; Environmental law; Environmental protection; Fish management; Harbours; Marine mammals; Marine oil spills; Marine transportation; Maritime law; Native land claims; Native peoples; Natural resource management; Natural resources; Navigation; Ocean management; Offshore oil well drilling; Parks; Petroleum law; Petroleum leases; Public participation; Regulatory agencies; Sea ice; Sustainable economic development; Tourist trade; Treaties; Water pollution; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife law; Wildlife management

G081, G061, G04, G02, G0812, G07, G12
Alaskan waters; Arctic Ocean; Beaufort Sea; Canadian Arctic waters; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; North Sea


Traditional knowledge and northern wildlife management   /   Muir, M.A.K.   Binder, L.N.
(Collecting and safeguarding the oral traditions : an international conference, Khon Kaen, Thailand, 16-19 August 1999, oganised as a Satellite Meeting of the 65th IFLA General Conference in Bangkok, Thailand, 1999 / Edited by John McIlwaine and Jean Whiffrin [i.e. Whiffin], p. 128-139, 1 map. IFLA publications, 95)
References.
ASTIS record 61438.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... This paper focuses on the role and importance of traditional knowledge in the co-management and use of reindeer, caribou, beluga whales and polar bears. The paper focuses primarily on the First Nation experience in Canada, but also refers to Saami experiences in Saami land. Saami land is located in the northern regions of Finland, Norway, Sweden, and the former Soviet Union. The paper also focuses on the collaboration of Canadian First Nations peoples with other Arctic Nations as a result of international agreements for this wildlife. Finally, the paper illustrates the importance of traditional knowledge in the management and sustainable use of reindeer, caribou, beluga whales and polar bears. The paper concludes with some reflections on future development and expansion of these regimes, and positive implications for the protection and dynamic use of traditional knowledge. ... (Au)

T, N, J, I, R
Aboriginal rights; Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal migration; Animal population; Arctic Institute of North America; Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan; Beluga whales; Caribou; Co-management; Effects monitoring; Fisheries Joint Management Committee (Canada); Gwich'in Indians; Hunting; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Inuvialuit Game Council; Native land claims; Native peoples; Nunavut Wildlife Management Board; Oral history; Polar bears; Porcupine Caribou Management Board; Public participation; Quotas; Reindeer husbandry; Research; Saami; Subsistence; Sustainable economic development; Traditional knowledge; Treaties; Wildlife management

G081, G13, G14, G04, G07, G02
Beaufort Sea; Bering Sea; Hudson Bay region; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; N.W.T.; Nunavut; Russian Arctic; Scandinavia; Wapusk National Park, Manitoba; Yukon North Slope


Regulatory framework for integrated management and marine protection in the Canadian Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea   /   Muir, M.A.K.
[S.l. : M.A.K. Muir], 2001.
74 p. : 1 map ; 29 cm.
References.
Report date: February 2, 2001.
ASTIS record 61435.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Introduction: This report examines the regulatory framework for a proposed marine protected area in an integrated management planning context, in order to understand the responsibilities of different government departments and agencies for integrated management and marine protection in Canadian Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea. This report contains two parts. The first part of the report is contained in chapters 1 to 5. The first three chapters contain this introduction, a discussion of the proposed marine protected area, and a discussion of private and commercial interests affecting the marine protected area. Chapter 4 reviews the international framework for integrated management and protection. Chapter 5 then discusses the Canadian framework for integrated management and marine protection. The second part of the report is contained in chapter 6 to 8. This portion of the report is an analysis of the different federal and territorial government departments and agencies, and their responsibilities for integrated management and marine protection. There is also a discussion of joint management boards and processes established in the Inuvialuit Final Agreement. The report concludes that a cooperative approach is required by all government departments and agencies to implement integrated management and marine protection in the Canadian Arctic Ocean. Further, existing legislation and plans provide sufficient tools to implement integrated management and marine protection. This legislation and plans may function in cooperation with voluntary approaches by private parties: It is often easier to understand government responsibilities in the context of a fact scenario. The fact scenario is a proposed marine protected area for beluga whales and beluga whale habitat in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. The protected area is located in the delta where the Mackenzie River flows into the Beaufort Sea. Given its location, the proposed marine protected area will be affected by oil and gas exploration and development in the offshore waters of the Beaufort Sea. It will also be affected by upstream developments on the Mackenzie River, and land-based developments in the Northwest and Yukon Territories. ... The first portion of the report continues in chapter 2 by discussing the proposed marine protected areas in the Mackenzie River and Beaufort Sea. Chapter 3 is a discussion of the private and commercial interests affecting the protected area. International and alternative approaches to marine protection are then considered in chapter 4. Finally, chapter 5 contains a discussion of the Canadian framework for marine protection. This chapter includes a summary of the role of departments and agencies for integrated management and marine protection in the Canadian Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea; illustrative tables; and analysis of the possible role of voluntary initiatives in implementing the proposed marine protected area in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. This chapter also functions as an executive summary and conclusions for the report. The second portion of the report then provides a more detailed examination of the responsibilities of government departments and agencies for integrated management, marine protection and the proposed marine protected area in the Canadian Arctic Ocean and Beaufort Sea. Responsibilities of the federal government are examined in chapter 6, followed by the responsibilities of the governments of the Northwest and Yukon Territories in chapter 7. Wildlife harvesting and management, and the joint management boards and processes established under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement are then examined in chapter 8. (Au)

J, R, D, T, I, N, L, Q, S
Aboriginal rights; Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act, 1970; Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan; Beluga whales; Canada Oil and Gas Act, 1981; Canadian Environmental Assessment Act; Co-management; Environmental law; Environmental protection; Fish management; Fisheries law; Government regulations; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use law; Marine pollution; Marine transportation; Maritime law; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Navigation; Ocean management; Oceans Act, 1977; Offshore oil well drilling; Parks; Regional planning; Regulatory agencies; Subsistence; Territorial Lands Act, 1952; Treaties; Whaling; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife law; Wildlife management

G03, G07, G0811, G0812
Arctic Ocean; Beaufort Sea; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; Mackenzie River region, N.W.T.; Yukon North Slope


Jurisdictional, Manitoba First Nations and Inuit issues for the Western Hudson Bay region : a discussion paper   /   Muir, M.A.K.
[Calgary, Alta. : International Energy, Environmental and Legal Services Ltd.], 2001.
96 p. : 1 map ; 29 cm.
Bibliography p. 91-96.
ASTIS record 51662 describes a CD-ROM ("Western Hudson Bay workshops : proceedings") which contains this paper as a PDF file.
ASTIS record 51752.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ieels.com/publications/2001whbr-frep-makm.pdf
Libraries: ACU

This report reviews jurisdictional, Manitoba First Nation and Inuit issues for the western Hudson Bay region. These issues need to be considered for integrated coastal management and marine protection for the region. The first section of the report is this overview. The second section of the report is an review of jurisdictional issues for the western Hudson Bay region. It begins with a review of resource uses and environmental issues for the region. This is followed by a review of the common law for water and coastal management. A discussion of the constitutional authority of federal, territorial and Manitoba governments then ensues. The section continues with a summary of relevant international agreements. The section on jurisdictional issues concludes with a discussion of the legislative responsibilities of governments and agencies. The next two sections of the report consider Manitoba First Nation and Inuit issues for the western Hudson Bay region. The third section of the report considers Manitoba First Nation rights and resource management arrangements involving First Nations in northern Manitoba. Manitoba First Nation rights include aboriginal rights, and those rights arising under historic numbered treaties, the Manitoba Treaty Land Entitlement Framework Agreement, and the Northern Flood Agreement. While there are a variety of resource management arrangements in northern Manitoba, discussion is limited to national parks, wildlife management areas, and resource management areas under the Northern Flood Agreement. Interjurisdictional arrangements for barren grounds caribou are also discussed. The fourth and final section of the report considers Inuit rights under the Nunavut Final Agreement, concentrating on the Kivalliq region. The Nunavut Settlement Area is defined, and Inuit lands, water rights and wildlife rights under the Agreement are reviewed. Next, there is a discussion of parks and conservation areas in the Nunavut Settlement Area. This is followed by a brief review of the land and resource management boards established under the Agreement, and their impact for marine areas within the Nunavut Settlement Area, as well as any impacts beyond this area. Finally, the section concludes with a summary of the impact of the Agreement in northern Manitoba, and offshore coastal waters. At the end of the report, there is a bibliography. The bibliography lists international conventions, constitutional documents, interjurisdictional agreements, legislation, judicial decisions, government policies, and publications. This report is intended to serve as a discussion paper. It reflects issues raised at the October 2000 workshops sponsored by Fisheries and Oceans Canada: The Western Hudson Bay Workshops: Charting a Coordinated Approach to Management of the Region. An earlier version of the section of the report on jurisdictional issues was presented at one of those workshops. At that time, comments were received from participants including Environment Canada, Manitoba Conservation, Parks Canada Agency, and Transport Canada. The analysis of jurisdiction was modified in response to those comments. ... (Au)

T, R, N, J, S, I
Aboriginal rights; Caribou; Co-management; Environmental impacts; Environmental law; Environmental policy; Environmental protection; Government; Government regulations; Government relations; Hydroelectric power generation; Indians; Inuit; Law; Native land claims; Native organizations; Natural resource management; Natural resources; Parks; Regulatory agencies; Tourist trade; Treaties; Watershed management; Wildlife management

G0814, G0824
Churchill, Manitoba; Hudson Bay; Hudson Bay region; Manitoba, Northern; Nunavut


Jurisdictional issues for the western Hudson Bay region   /   Muir, M.A.K.
[Calgary, Alta.] : International Energy, Environmental and Legal Services Ltd., 2000.
32 p. : 1 map ; 28 cm.
References.
Indexed a PDF file on a CD-ROM which is described by ASTIS record 53083 and titled: "The Hudson Bay databases : a compilation of maps and literature relevant to the Hudson and James Bay regions".
ASTIS record 51752 describes a slightly modified version of this document that is part of a larger report.
ASTIS record 53088.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Jurisdictional issues are complex in the western Hudson Bay region. Despite its relative isolation, the western Hudson Bay region is subject to different governments and legislation, international agreements, and Inuit and First Nation rights. This paper begins [with] a description of the geographical ambit of the western Hudson Bay region. It continues with a summary of resource uses and environmental issues for the western Hudson Bay region. A review of the common law for water and coastal management follows. There is then a summary of the constitutional authority of federal, territorial and Manitoba governments. Relevant international agreements are discussed. Finally, the legislative responsibilities of different governments are summarized, including land and resource management boards established under the Nunavut Final Agreement. This paper is part of a larger report that also considers Inuit and Manitoba First Nation issues for the western Hudson Bay region. ... Both this paper and the larger report suggest that there are many common issues for Kivilliq and Manitoba. Similar jurisdictional issues are present in Kivilliq and Manitoba. Despite differences in governmental structures, common jurisdictional issues exist throughout the region. These issues include complexity of regulation, duplication and overlap of federal and regional government functions, and allocation of scarce financial resources and staff. These common jurisdictional issues will shape any cooperative approach to integrated coastal management and marine protection in the western Hudson Bay region. Similarly, there are common aboriginal issues for Kivilliq and Manitoba that are relevant for coastal management and marine protection. Common aboriginal issues include subsistence and commercial wildlife harvesting; tourism and guiding opportunities for [hunting] wildlife; wildlife management and aboriginal participation; the structure of parks and conservation areas and aboriginal uses and economic participation in these areas; and the management ofinter-jurisdictional species such as beluga whales and polar bears. Finally, it is an appropriate time to implement integrated coastal management and marine protection for the western Hudson Bay region. Both Kivilliq and Manitoba are on the cusp of experiencing greater economic activity and related pressures on ecosystems. As such, it is an appropriate time to implement a cooperative multi-stakeholder approach to ensure that the inevitable economic development occurs in the context of an integrated approach to the region. ... (Au)

R, T, N, J, I, S
Aboriginal rights; Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy; Bioaccumulation; Boundaries; Caribou; Co-management; Dams; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Fisheries; Fishing; Food chain; Government; Government regulations; Hydroelectric power; Indians; International Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears; Inuit; Law; Marine mammals; Mercury; Native land claims; Native organizations; Parks; Pollution; POPs; Quotas; Regulatory agencies; Subsistence; Tourist trade; Treaties; Wildlife management

G0814, G0824, G0825, G0813
Churchill, Manitoba; Hudson Bay; Hudson Bay region, Manitoba; Manitoba, Northern; McConnell River Migratory Bird Sanctuary, Nunavut; Nunavut; Polar Bear Provincial Park, Ontario


Regulation of marine transportation and implications for ocean management in Hudson Bay   /   Muir, M.A.K.   Pirie, D.   Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans [Sponsor]
[S.l. : s.n.], 2000.
76 p. : maps ; 29 cm.
Cover title.
References.
ASTIS record 50233.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The report examines the overall regulatory regime for marine transportation, and Canada's initiatives under the Oceans Act for an ocean management strategy for Hudson Bay. The report draws conclusions and recommendations from this examination. ... The report begins with an executive summary containing conclusions and recommendations. The regulatory complexity illustrated by marine transportation underpins the need for a consistent and integrated approach to marine issues by government departments and private interests. Based on this complexity of interests and regulation, the report concludes that an integrated approach to coastal management is advisable for Hudson Bay. This report then recommends the formation of a working group of governmental and private interests as the first step for developing an integrated approach to Hudson Bay and the adjacent Manitoba coast. ... The analysis is part 2 of the report and begins with a description of Hudson Bay and the Port of Churchill, and some of the activities that impact the bay and the port. The report then discusses the development of an ocean management strategy for Hudson Bay under the Oceans Act. ... The analysis in part 2 concludes with a bibliography of source material. This bibliography lists international agreements and conventions, constitutional documents, land claim agreements, Canadian and Manitoba legislation, and selected policy papers and publications. Part 3 of the report provides a summary of regulation for the two marine transportation scenarios. This summary of regulation is intended to function as a reference and to support the analysis in part 2 of the report. Part 3 of the report provides extensive detail on the international, national and provincial regulatory regimes for marine transportation in Hudson Bay. There is a review of the fact situation, a summary of federal and Manitoba legislation, and a chart of legislation for the two scenarios. (Au)

L, R, N, D, J, T
Co-management; Environmental law; Environmental policy; Environmental protection; Government regulations; Harbours; Insurance; Management; Marine pollution; Marine transportation; Maritime law; Native peoples; Natural history; Navigation; Oceanography; Transportation law; Treaties; Wildlife management

G0814, G0824, G0815
Churchill, Manitoba; Hudson Bay; Hudson Strait, Nunavut/Québec; Manitoba; Nunavut


Jurisdictional issues for fish and marine management in northern Manitoba   /   International Energy, Environmental and Legal Services Ltd.   Muir, M.A.K.   Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans [Sponsor]
[Winnipeg, Man.] : DFO [distributor], 1999.
44 leaves : 1 map ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
References.
Unpublished report dated 1999-06-25.
Also available on the Web.
ASTIS record 61376.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ieels.com/publications/jurissman-1999-06-25.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Summary: This is a brief analysis of jurisdictional issues for fish and marine mammals for the coast of northern Manitoba. It is an overview of the relevant issues; it is not a legal analysis or opinion. Despite its relative isolation, the coast of northern Manitoba is subject to myriad levels of government, legislation and international agreements. However, not all these responsibilities, legislation, and agreements are uniformly implemented. This analysis highlights some of the jurisdictional issues that need to be considered when establishing an integrated system of fish and marine management. The analysis is not exhaustive and gives rise to as many questions as it answers. For example, what is the existing regulatory regime and the role of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans under the regime? Further how is that regime modified and changed as a result of rights and processes under the Inuit Final Agreement? The analysis begins with the review of the common law regime and constitutional jurisdiction of the federal and Manitoba governments on the coast and in adjacent offshore waters. The international regime applicable to area is then summarized, followed by a review of the responsibilities and legislation of the federal and provincial government departments. The analysis then examines the Inuit Final Agreement and its application to northern Manitoba. It continues with an overview of the issues for fish and marine mammals. The analysis concludes with a discussion of the possible role for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in integrated fish and marine management regime for northern Manitoba. (Au)

I, N, R, T, L, E, J, G, S
Aboriginal rights; Animal migration; Beluga whales; Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans; Climate change; Dams; Design and construction; Dredging; Environmental impacts; Environmental law; Environmental protection; Fast ice; Fish management; Fisheries law; Fishes; Fishing; Government; Harbours; Hydroelectric power; Indians; Inuit; Marine mammals; Marine transportation; Maritime law; Mercury; Native land claims; Navigation; Nunavut Land Claims Agreement; Ocean management; Parks; Planning; Polar bears; Pollution; Seals (Animals); Stream flow; Subsistence; Tourist trade; Toxicity; Transportation law; Treaties; Walruses; Water resources law; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife law; Wildlife management

G0824, G0813, G0814
Churchill River, Manitoba/Saskatchewan; Churchill, Manitoba; Hudson Bay; James Bay; Manitoba, Northern; Nunavut; Wapusk National Park, Manitoba


Marine conservation and beluga management in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region : can marine protected areas play a role?   /   Fast, H.   Mathias, J.   Storache, F.   Muir, M.A.K.   Meltzer, E.   Fisheries Joint Management Committee (Canada) [Sponsor]   Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans [Sponsor]   University of Manitoba [Sponsor]
[Canada : s.n.], 1998.
viii, 53 p. ; 28 cm.
Appendix.
References.
Also available on the Web.
ASTIS record 58237.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/235419.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Executive summary: The purpose of this report is to consider whether a Marine Protected Area could be used effectively for marine conservation in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), and to consider in particular, its relevance for the management of beluga whales. MARINE CONSERVATION: Conservation planning in the ISR began as a recommendation of the Berger Report in 1977. Seven years later, at the same time the Inuvialuit Final Agreement was signed, the Task Force on Northern Conservation recommended a framework for a comprehensive conservation policy, including both terrestrial and marine elements. The Task Force report was important because it addressed the root problems of the existing planning and conservation process. This framework has remained as a guide up until the present time, and is reflected in a number of key land use and renewable resource conservation plans which have been produced since then. Several initiatives recommended by the Task Force on Northern Conservation and carried forward in subsequent planning documents are: -A mechanism for integrated resource management which would be proactive and decision-oriented rather than one which was reactive and regulation-oriented, and which would be imbedded within a framework for comprehensive planning with extensive public input. -A comprehensive network of land and water 'protected areas' based on local knowledge and resource use, in which activities could be controlled. -Endorsement of management principles specific to the marine environment. -Establishment of a conservation advisory board to bring unity to the efforts of numerous government agencies. -“Acceptance and implementation by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans of its legitimate responsibility as the lead agency for Arctic marine conservation”. All of these initiatives, in one form or another, are empowered by the Canada Oceans Act and by the new policies which are being developed under it, such as the “Oceans Strategy” (DFO 1998) and the “Approach to the establishment and management of marine protected areas” (DFO 1997). The Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan recognizes the complexity of the environmental and development issues to be managed in achieving the goals of conserving beluga whales and beluga habitat. This report reviews federal legislation which could be used to protect belugas and their habitat. The legislation is scattered throughout a large number of agencies, and for the most part tends to be regulatory and reactive rather than foster a proactive, planning approach. It is probably possible to implement enforcement measures for the Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan with regulatory changes to certain federal legislation. However, this approach will not open the door to the comprehensive planning which is possible under the Canada Oceans Act. This analysis led to the following recommendation: RECOMMENDATION 1: The Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan should be formalized within the context of the Canada Oceans Act rather than through changes in specific pieces of legislation such as the Fisheries Act or the Canada Shipping Act. (Au)

I, N, R, T, J, Q, L
Aircraft disturbance; Animal distribution; Animal migration; Animal population; Beluga whales; Boats; Co-management; Dredging; Economic development; Environmental impacts; Environmental law; Environmental protection; Fish management; Government regulations; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use; Marine mammals; Marine pollution; Marine transportation; Maritime law; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Offshore oil well drilling; Petroleum law; Planning; Quotas; Seasonal variations; Social surveys; Sustainable economic development; Tourist trade; Whaling; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife law; Wildlife management; Winter ecology

G07, G0812, G0815
Aklavik, N.W.T.; Amundsen Gulf, N.W.T.; Bathurst, Cape, N.W.T.; Beaufort Sea; Inuvik, N.W.T.; Kay Point waters, Yukon; Kugmallit Bay, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Bay, N.W.T./Yukon; Mackenzie Estuary, N.W.T./Yukon; Mackenzie River, N.W.T.; Shallow Bay, N.W.T.; Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T.


Report on North American models for First Nations participation in energy development with emphasis on environmental protection : for The University of Calgary/OLADE Energy and Environmental Project   /   Muir, M.A.K.
[Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary, Faculty of Law, 1997].
29 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
Report date: 1997 September 30.
A shorter version of this paper is available in: Energy and environmental law in Latin America and the Caribbean : legislative inventory and analysis : University of Calgary/OLADE Energy and Environmental Law Project / L.K. Barrera-Hernández, A.R. Lucas, E. McCoy, J. McReady.
ASTIS record 61446.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Executive Summary: Introduction: Throughout the Americas, indigenous peoples are recognized as having distinct interests, and concerns which are tied to the historic use and occupancy of the land. As a result of Canada's constitutional protection of aboriginal rights, Canada has been at the forefront; developing models for First Nation (Canada's indigenous peoples) participation in government, the economy and resource management. This report reviews First Nation participation in Canadian energy projects with a focus on the environment in order to develop different models for that participation. These models are extensively examined in the Appendix in order to understand alternative ways of incorporating indigenous concerns into energy projects in other parts of the world, including Latin America. First Nations and energy industry associations are also important as First Nations involvement affects many aspects of the Canadian energy industry. Therefore, the role and initiatives of the Indian Resource Council of Canada and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers are discussed in the Executive Summary. Finally, a descriptive essay in the Appendix provides a legal and conceptual framework for aboriginal and treaty rights, and First Nation participation in Canadian energy projects. The essay also provides some brief comments about the potential application of the different models to energy projects in Latin America. (Au)

T, Q, R, J, L, D
Aboriginal rights; Alberta. Energy Resources Conservation Board; Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers; Co-management; Communication; Economic development; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental law; Environmental protection; Government relations; Indian reserves; Indians; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use law; Marine oil spills; Native land claims; Natural gas processing facilities; Offshore oil well blowouts; Oil spill cleanup; Oil well drilling; Petroleum industry; Petroleum law; Pollution; Public participation; Regulatory agencies; Risk assessment; Self-determination; Traditional land use and occupancy; Water resources law; Wildlife management

G081, G07, G0812, G0822
Alberta; Beaufort Sea; Canadian Arctic; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon


Analysis of the Inuvialuit Final Agreement and marine protected areas under the Oceans Act   /   Muir, M.A.K.
Calgary, Alta. : M.A.K. Muir, 1997.
71 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.
Cover title.
Glossary
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 50232.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This is an analysis of the Inuvialuit Final Agreement (referred to as the IFA or the Agreement) and marine protected areas under the Oceans Act. Provisions in the IFA affecting beluga whale management, and provisions in the Ocean Act establishing marine protected areas are examined. This analysis is not, and is not intended to be, a legal opinion on either the IFA or the Oceans Act, or any specific provision under the Agreement or Act. Other legislation, which has a role with respect to beluga management, such as the Fisheries Act, is commented on briefly. Inuvialuit rights, and IFA processes and administrative structures are first examined. ... The marine protected areas regime under the Oceans Act is then examined, in conjunction with a recent discussion paper from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. ... The Oceans Act marine protected area regime is contrasted with the Beaufort Sea Beluga Management Plan, with some references to IFA requirements. The analysis contains conclusions and recommendations. It concludes that the establishment of a marine protected area under the Oceans Act is consistent with the IFA. However, any marine protected area for beluga whales in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region must be consistent with the terms of the IFA and the rights, processes and boards established under the Agreement. (Au)

R, T, N, I, J
Beluga whales; Co-management; Environmental protection; Fisheries Joint Management Committee (Canada); Fisheries law; Fishing; Government regulations; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Inuvialuit Game Council; Native land claims; Natural resource management; Tourist trade; Whaling; Wildlife law; Wildlife management

G0812, G07, G0811, G0815, G03
Canadian Beaufort Sea; Inuvialuit Settlement Region waters, N.W.T./Yukon; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon


Comprehensive land claims agreements of the Northwest Territories : implications for land and water management   /   Muir, M.A.K.
Calgary, Alta. : Canadian Institute of Resources Law : Arctic Institute of North America, 1994.
vi, 152 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
ISBN 0-919269-44-3
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 35045.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The book examines the land and water management processes under comprehensive aboriginal land claims agreements in order to understand the resulting management process for the Northwest Territories. Water is used as a model to assist in this examination. The book analyzes the aboriginal-government land and water management boards established under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement, the Gwich'in Final Agreement and the Tungavik Federation of Nunavut Final Agreement, for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, the Mackenzie Valley and the Nunavut Settlement Area respectively. To a lesser extent, the book also considers private aboriginal water rights transferred or recognized under the agreements. The book first considers general legal issues that apply to all three claims agreements, including aboriginal rights and title, the cessation of such rights and title under the agreements, the legal and constitutional status of the agreements, the likely judicial interpretation of the agreements, and the interaction of the agreements with legislation. [It also] ... examines private aboriginal water rights and the land and water management boards under each of the agreements. ... [and] concludes that the agreements create distinct land and water management processes, with differing approaches to legislation, for each claims area. Further, the book concludes that it will be very difficult to have a comprehensive land and water management process for the Northwest Territories in the absence of a consistent approach to land and water management and to legislation in the agreements. (Au)

T, S, F, N, R
Co-management; Government; Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use; Land use law; Native land claims; Nunavut Land Claims Agreement; Planning; Self-determination; Tungavik Federation of Nunavut; Water resources; Water resources law; Watershed management

G0812, G0811, G0813
Gwich'in Settlement Area, N.W.T.; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; Mackenzie River region, N.W.T.; Nunavut


Comprehensive land claims agreements : implications for water management in the Northwest Territories   /   Muir, M.A.K.
[S.l. : Arctic Institute of North America], 1992.
240 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
Appendix.
ASTIS record 34871.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This analysis concludes with an executive summary of the impact of the land claims agreement on water management in the Northwest Territories. The executive summary also includes an overview of the implications of land claims agreements for the devolution of water resources from the federal government to the territorial government. Lastly, the executive summary contains recommendations for the successful integration of land claims agreements and legislation respecting water in the Northwest Territories. (Au)

T, S, F, N, R
Government; Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use; Native land claims; Planning; Self-determination; Tungavik Federation of Nunavut; Water resources; Water resources law; Watershed management

G0812, G0811, G0813
Gwich'in Settlement Area, N.W.T.; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; N.W.T.; Nunavut


Comprehensive land claims agreements and their implications for resource management in the Northwest Territories [Les ententes globales concernant les revendications territoriales des Autochtones et leurs implications pour la gestion des ressources dans les Territoires-du-Nord-Ouest]   /   Muir, M.A.K.
(Student research in Canada's North : proceedings of the Third National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, October 23-24, 1991 / Edited by W.O. Kupsch and J.F. Basinger. Musk-ox, no. 39, special publication, 1992, p. 256-259, 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 34211.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The federal government, assisted by the territorial government, has embarked upon comprehensive claims negotiations to resolve outstanding aboriginal title to all lands and waters in the Northwest Territories. Three aboriginal claims agreements have now been negotiated. The agreements recognize aboriginal ownership of lands and aboriginal interests in wildlife and resources, and create joint management boards for decisions affecting the claims area. When ratified, these agreements have priority over inconsistent federal or territorial legislation. (Au)

T, S, R, F, N
Co-management; Government; Land titles; Native land claims; Natural resource management; Water resources

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


Impact of aboriginal claims agreements on environmental review in the Northwest Territories   /   Muir, M.A.K.
(Journal of environmental law and practice, v. 1, no. 3, Aug. 1991, p. 283-316)
ASTIS record 35644.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Comprehensive aboriginal claims agreements are currently being negotiated or have been recently ratified and implemented in different regions of Canada. Aboriginal claims agreements are extensive documents which include financial compensation; the transference of ownership of large tracts of land; and the establishment of land, water and resource management regimes with guaranteed aboriginal participation. This article examines how three agreements from the Northwest Territories presently or potentially affect environmental review. Emphasis is placed on their integration or modification of existing and future environmental review processes. (Au)

R, T
Canada. Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process; Co-management; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental law; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use; Native land claims; Native peoples; Tungavik Federation of Nunavut

G0812, G0813, G0811
Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; N.W.T.; Nunavut


Impact of land claims agreements on water management in the Northwest Territories   /   Muir, M.A.K.
[Calgary, Alberta : M.A.K. Muir], 1990.
[239] p. : maps ; 28 cm.
Appendix.
Indexed a photocopy.
References.
Report date: June 11, 1990.
ASTIS record 61432.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Chapter 1: Introduction. Currently the Northwest Territories are in the throes of rapid political change. One aspect of this change is manifested in the comprehensive land claims agreements. The Western Arctic Claim: the Inuvialuit Final Agreement (1984) (subsequently referred to as the "IFA") and the Dene/Metis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement-in-Principle (1988) (subsequently referred to as the "D/M AIP") have been negotiated between native groups and the federal government, with the territorial government being a signatory to the agreements. ... This paper will examine how the IFA and the D/M AIP affect or potentially affect the existing regime for water management in the Northwest Territories. The analysis will be directed to two specific areas. Firstly, there will be an examination of water rights arising from ownership of land. Secondly, there will be an examination of rights over water arising from the management and control of water. While water management has many facets, the analysis here will be limited to a consideration of the legal and administrative effects of the land claims agreements on water management. A preliminary issue to be addressed is the characteristics of northern and southern water systems. ... The paper focuses upon the following areas. It contains a brief overview of the common law with respect to water. ... The paper follows with an analysis of the legislation respecting water in the Northwest Territories. First, it examines the extent to which the common law subsists in light of legislation in the Northwest Territories. Next, there is an analysis of the regulatory scheme created by legislation. The primary legislation is the Northern Inland Waters Act, R.S.C.c. N-25 which creates a management regime for the conservation, development and utilization of water resources in the Northwest Territories and, pursuant to that mandate, establishes a territorial Water Board to licence water uses. The Act is central to this analysis as the paper will primarily focus upon the interaction between the water management regime created under the Northern Inland Waters Act and rights to water granted under the IFA and the D/M AIP. ... The main part of the analysis will focus on the land claims agreements. There will be a discussion of the legal status of the land claims agreements and rights granted under them. ... The substantive portion of the analysis then follows. It will identify the relevant provisions in the land claims agreements for water management and analyze how these provisions integrate with and affect the existing legislative system of water management. As each land claims agreement demonstrates a different approach to water, each land claims agreement will be addressed individually although comparisons will be made to the other. ... The paper will then conclude by summarizing the findings of the paper and by making recommendations to alleviate difficulties raised in the course of the analysis. The recommendations will focus on difficulties between the existing water management regime and rights and institutions existing under the IFA and proposed under the D/M AIP. (Au)

T, S, F, N, R
Aboriginal rights; Co-management; Constitution Act, 1982; Dene Indians; Environmental Impact Screening Committee; Government; Inuit; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; Land use; Metis; Native land claims; Northern Inland Waters Act, 1972; Planning; River deltas; Sahtu Dene and Metis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement; Self-determination; Water resources; Water resources law; Watershed management

G0812, G0811
Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; Mackenzie River, N.W.T.; N.W.T.; Yukon North Slope


© Arctic Institute of North America. Records from this database may be used freely for research and educational purposes, but may not be used to create databases or publications for distribution outside your own organization without prior permission from ASTIS.