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The ASTIS database cites the following 28 publication(s) by Robert van Everdingen. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Permafrost groundwater region   /   Michel, F.A.   van Everdingen, R.O.   Woo, M.-k.   Dyke, L.
In: Canada's groundwater resources / Edited by A. Rivera. - Markham, Ont. : Fitzhenry Whiteside, 2014, ch. 15, p. 596-636, ill., maps
ASTIS record 80231.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Conclusions: The northern region comprises over 50% of Canada's land mass, encompassing all of Canada north of the southern limit of discontinuous permafrost. The region includes a wide variety of geologic and physiographic terranes, which create a large range of groundwater conditions. Relatively little is known about the permafrost control of groundwater flow since the region is sparsely populated, and groundwater is utilized primarily as a water supply for communities within Yukon. Permafrost is known to act as a barrier to groundwater recharge when the permafrost is ice-bonded and continuous. Groundwater flow through permafrost is restricted to taliks created by the thermal or chemical conditions of the groundwater. Groundwater that discharges directly into rivers from taliks can provide perennial baseflow, and result in open reaches within the rivers during winter: these provide important fish habitat. Major issues in the region related to groundwater flow, or the effects of phase change between water and ice, include the construction of infrastructure (especially pipelines and highways), mining development, contaminant migration, and climate change. (Au)

C, A, E, J, L, P, Q, F
Chemical properties; Climate change; Design and construction; Drainage; Effects of climate on permafrost; Frost heaving; Geology; Groundwater; Hydrology; Icings; Karst; Mining; Moisture content of permafrost; Permafrost; Pipelines; Plant-water relationships; Roads; Soil percolation; Springs (Hydrology); Tailings; Thaw settlement; Thermal protection of permafrost; Thermokarst; Water pollution; Water supply

G081
Canadian Arctic


Proceedings : 14th Inuit Studies Conference, 11-15 August 2004, the Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada   /   van Everdingen, R.O. [Compiler]   Arctic Institute of North America [Sponsor]   University of Calgary [Sponsor]   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]   Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Canada [Sponsor]
[Calgary, Alta. : AINA, 2005.]
xvi, 394 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
Indexed from a PDF file.
The conference organizing committee included: AINA board and staff, U of C Conference and Special Events, Dr. Robert O. van Everdingen, Dr. Robert G. Williamson, and Karla Jessen Williamson.
ASTIS record 54638 describes the programme and abstracts of the 14th Inuit Studies Conference.
References.
ASTIS record 58294.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/aina/14thISCProceedings.pdf

During the 14th Inuit Studies Conference, entitled Bringing Knowledge Home: Communicating Research Results to the Inuit, a total of 78 presentations were made. Six plenary speakers shared their experiences in the meaningful delivery of research results and the negotiation of follow-up research procedures with Inuit communities in Greenland, Canada, and Alaska. Experiences were shared from both the academic and the Inuit points of view. The papers presented at this conference covered a wide arrray of topics and were organized into 13 sessions: A - Inuit and Qallunaat: Cross-Cultural Communication, Modes of Sharing; B - Use of Inuktitut Languages: Traditional Material and Modern Methods; C - Outside Science Returns to the Inuit; D - Modes of Analysis of Inuit Self-Determination; E - Inuit Ilirqusingi: Inuit Speech, Customs and Modern Cultural Expression; F - Ilinniarniq: Inuit Future through Education; G - Inuit Health and Well-being; H - Inuit Knowledge Transfer; I - Local Food and Contaminants; J - Retrieving Arctic History from Archives; K - St. Luke's Hospital, Pangnirtung: Missionary Nurses and People; L - Inuktitut Uqauttin Weeks: Promotion of Inuktitut in Nunavut; M - Theorizing Inuit Studies: Retrospect, Prospects and Ethics. The Proceedings volume contains an outline of the sessions and 23 full papers, as well as abstracts for the 55 presentations for which no full papers were received. (ASTIS)

T, L, J, K, V, R, Y, N, H, I
Archives; Art; ASTIS; Coast changes; Communication; Distance education; Education; Ethnobotany; Ethnography; Food; Handicrafts; Health; Health care; Higher education; History; Housing; Identity; Internet; Inuit languages; Journalism; Judicial systems; Kayaks; Land use; Missionaries; Motion pictures; Native land claims; Negotiation; Newspapers; Northern Contaminants Program (Canada); Oral history; Participatory action research; Photograph collections; Plants (Biology); Pollution; Public education campaigns; Research; Safety; Self-determination; Snow; Social change; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Toxicity; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy; Wildlife management

G0812, G0813, G0826, G0827, G06, G10, G141
Alaska; Greenland; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; Nunatsiavut, Labrador; Nunavik, Québec; Nunavut; Sibir', Russian Federation


14th Inuit Studies Conference : bringing knowledge home : communicating research results to the Inuit. Programme and abstracts, 11-15 August 2004, Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary   /   van Everdingen, R.O. [Compiler]   Arctic Institute of North America [Sponsor]   University of Calgary [Sponsor]   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]   Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Canada [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : AINA, 2004.
63 p. ; 28 cm.
University of Calgary campus map appended.
The conference organizing committee included: AINA board and staff, U of C Conference and Special Events, Dr. Robert O. van Everdingen, Dr. Robert G. Williamson, and Karla Jessen Williamson.
ASTIS record 58294 describes the proceedings of the 14th Inuit Studies Conference.
Available on the Web.
ASTIS record 54638.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/aina/14thISCAbstracts.pdf
Libraries: ACU

The title of this, the 14th Inuit Studies Conference, is Bringing Knowledge Home: Communicating Research Results to the Inuit. Six plenary speakers shared their experiences in the meaningful delivery of research results and the negotiation of follow-up research procedures, in Inuit communities in Greenland, Canada, and Alaska. Experiences were shared from both the academic and the Inuit points of view. The papers presented at this conference covered a wide arrray of topics and were organized into 13 sessions: A- Inuit and Qallunaat: Cross-Cultural Communication, Modes of Sharing; B- Use of Inuktitut Languages: Traditional Material and Modern Methods; C- Outside Science Returns to the Inuit; D- Modes of Analysis of Inuit Self-Determination; E- Inuit Ilirqusingi: Inuit Speech, Customs and Modern Cultural Expression; F- Ilinniarniq: Inuit Future through Education; G- Inuit Health and Well-being; H- Inuit Knowledge Transfer; I- Local Food and Contaminants; J- Retrieving Arctic History from Archives; K- St. Luke's Hospital, Pangnirtung: Missionary Nurses and People; L- Inuktitut Uqauttin Weeks: Promotion of Inuktitut in Nunavut; M- Theorizing Inuit Studies: Retrospect, Prospects and Ethics. (ASTIS)

T, L, J, K, V, R, Y, N
ASTIS; Coast changes; Communication; Distance education; Education; Ethnobotany; Ethnography; Food; Handicrafts; Health; Health care; Higher education; History; Housing; Identity; Internet; Inuit languages; Journalism; Judicial systems; Kayaks; Land use; Missionaries; Motion pictures; Native land claims; Negotiation; Newspapers; Northern Contaminants Program (Canada); Oral history; Participatory action research; Photograph collections; Pollution; Public education campaigns; Research; Safety; Self-determination; Snow; Social change; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Toxicity; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy; Wildlife management

G0812, G0813, G0826, G06, G10, G141
Alaska; Greenland; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; Nunatsiavut, Labrador; Nunavik, Québec; Nunavut; Sibir', Russian Federation


Multi-language glossary of permafrost and related ground-ice terms in Chinese, English, French, German, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish   /   van Everdingen, R.O. [Editor]
Rev. ed.
Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America, 1998.
iv, 4, 52, 8, 6, 6, 4, 6, 6, 6, 6, 14, 8, 6, 78, 12, 46 p. : ill., 1 map ; 22 cm.
References.
Text in Chinese, English, French, German, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish.
ASTIS record 51760.
Languages: Many Languages
Web: http://nsidc.org/fgdc/glossary
Libraries: ACU

During the 5th International Permafrost Conference, held in Trondheim (Norway) in August 1988, the Council of the International Permafrost Association (IPA) authorized the establishment of a Terminology Working Group with the mandate "to develop a set of internationally accepted permafrost terms for use in engineering and science, with equivalents in various languages, and to disseminate and encourage the use of such terminology". The Terminology Working Group was established in the fall of 1988, with members from Argentina, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, the USA, and the (former) USSR. Members from Italy, Norway and Sweden were added later. The Working Group agreed to use as the basis for its work the "Glossary of Permafrost and Related Ground-Ice Terms", (Permafrost Subcommittee, 1988), which had updated and expanded upon the "Permafrost Terminology" of Brown and Kupsch (1974), which had just been published. The initial effort was directed towards the preparation of a multi-language listing incorporating the primary and secondary terms from the 1988 Glossary, and a number of synonyms. The languages to be covered by the index were to be English, French, German, Spanish, and Russian. By the end of 1994, Italian, Norwegian, and Swedish were included. The effort was coordinated by the Chair of the Working Group, at the Arctic Institute of North America. In December 1994 a pre-publication version was printed for limited distribution to solicit comments and corrections (van Everdingen, 1994). Corrections were made and some additional terms incorporated in 1995, 1996, and 1998. In addition, Chinese, Icelandic, Polish, and Romanian were included. ... The current "Version 2" of the IPA glossary should be regarded as the latest stage of a work in progress, because the teminology in permafrost science and engineering are continuing to evolve, and the Glossary should evolve with it. In the future, the addition of terms in other languages, e.g. Finnish, might also be considered. ... (Au)

C
Chinese language; Dictionaries; Electronic data processing; English language; French language; German language; Ground ice; Icelandic language; Italian language; Norwegian language; Permafrost; Polish language; Romanian language; Russian language; Spanish language; Swedish language; Terminology

G02
Arctic regions


A Russian/English dictionary of permafrost terms   /   Romanovsky, N.N.   van Everdingen, R.O.
In: Bi-polar information initiatives : the needs of polar research : proceedings of the 15th Polar Libraries Colloquy, July 3-8, 1994, Cambridge, UK / Edited by D.W.H. Walton, W. Mills and C.M. Phillips. - Huntingdon, UK : Bluntisham Books, 1995, p. 178
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 35733.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... in 1991, N.N. Romanovsky, V.N. Konishchev and G. Rozenbaum (Moscow State University) started work on a Russian-English dictionary on geocryology and related scientific fields. An initial draft was circulated in 1992, followed by an expanded version in 1993. The latest draft, containing more than 3000 terms, was circulated for comments in early 1994. Some editing of the English entries was performed by van Everdingen, who also transformed the disk file of the dictionary into a Wordperfect (version 5.1) database to enable production of both Russian/English and English/Russian versions. The dictionary is maintained as a master list of records, in which each record comprises two fields: 1) a Russian term, and 2) its English equivalent. The database can be sorted alphabetically for either of the two languages. Small files of layout specifications are then used to prepare separate versions of the dictionary for each language, with the terms in the selected language as the prime entries. In this single-column format, each version is 142 pages long. The number of pages can be reduced to 57 by adoption of a two-column format. A utility program (Lines, Boxes, etc. from MAP Systems, Houston) is used by the second author to enhance printer quality and printing speed on dot-matrix printers. Currently, the dictionary database file occupies 610 154 bytes on diskette; individual language versions with layout specifications occupy 948 875 bytes on diskette. Definitions and comments are now being added to the dictionary by the Russian authors. Transliterations of Russian terms, from the Cyrillic alphabet to the Latin Alphabet, using the Library of Congress system, may be added at a later date for the convenience of non-Russian users. (Au)

C
Dictionaries; Electronic data processing; English language; Ground ice; Permafrost; Russian language; Terminology

G01
Polar regions


A multi-language index of permafrost terms   /   van Everdingen, R.O.
In: Bi-polar information initiatives : the needs of polar research : proceedings of the 15th Polar Libraries Colloquy, July 3-8, 1994, Cambridge, UK / Edited by D.W.H. Walton, W. Mills and C.M. Phillips. - Huntingdon, UK : Bluntisham Books, 1995, p. 152-154
References.
ASTIS record 35732.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Terminology Working Group of the International Permafrost Association has prepared a multi-language index of the main terms and synonyms contained in the "Glossary of Permafrost and Related Ground-Ice Terms" published by the National Research Council of Canada in 1988. The index covers some 650 terms and synonyms in English, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish, and Russian. To simplify editing and updating, the index is prepared as a database, using WordPerfect version 5.1 for IBM-compatible computers. The database occupies about 260 000 bytes of diskette; it can be sorted alphabetically for any of the eight languages. Small files of layout specifications are used to print separate versions of the index for each of the eight languages, with the terms in the selected language as the prime entries. In the printouts, the sequence of the secondary entries can be varied as desired, but the Russian terms and their transliterations are most easily listed after the other languages, to minimize printer commands in the layout specifications. A database of English definitions for all the terms is also being prepared. Printouts of the current draft versions of the index and definitions will be available for distribution in hard-copy format, at cost. (Au)

C
Dictionaries; Electronic data processing; English language; French language; German language; Ground ice; Italian language; Norwegian language; Permafrost; Russian language; Spanish language; Swedish language; Terminology

G01
Polar regions


Changes in hydrogeologic regimes in permafrost regions due to climatic change   /   Michel, F.A.   van Everdingen, R.O.
(Permafrost and periglacial processes, v. 5, no. 3, Sept. 1994, p. 191-195)
References.
ASTIS record 61397.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1002/ppp.3430050308
Libraries: ACU

The general and specific effects of predicted climate change on groundwater systems in permafrost regions are summarized. Besides a general decrease in the thickness and areal distribution of permafrost, a large unfrozen near-surface aquifer with perennial groundwater flow might develop. Recharge and discharge would become more active and increased groundwater discharge would affect the baseflow of many rivers and the chemistry of their waters. (Au)

E, C, F, J, A
Atmospheric temperature; Climate change; Drainage; Effects of climate on ice; Environmental impacts; Frost heaving; Frost mounds; Frozen ground; Ground ice; Groundwater; Hydrology; Icings; Karst; Lakes; Landslides; Permafrost; River discharges; Rivers; Soil temperature; Spatial distribution; Springs (Hydrology); Stream flow; Surface temperature; Temporal variations; Thaw settlement; Thawing; Thickness

G081
Canadian Arctic


Multi-language glossary of permafrost and related ground-ice terms in English, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish, and Russian   /   van Everdingen, R.O. [Editor]
Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America, 1994.
iii, 4, 29, 27, 26, 26, 28, 28, 29, 30, 73, 10 p. ; 22 cm.
One hundred pre-publication copies have been printed for distribution by the editor.
References.
Text in English, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish and Russian.
ASTIS record 35723.
Languages: Many Languages

During the 5th International Permafrost Conference, held in Trondheim (Norway) in August 1988, the Council of the International Permafrost Association (IPA) authorized the establishment of a Terminology Working Group with the mandate "to develop a set of internationally accepted permafrost terms for use in engineering and science, with equivalents in various languages, and to disseminate and encourage the use of such terminology". The Terminology Working Group was established in the fall of 1988, with members from Argentina, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, the USA, and the (former) USSR. Members from Italy, Norway and Sweden were added later. The Working Group agreed to use as the basis for its work the "Glossary of Permafrost and Related Ground-Ice Terms", which had been published (Permafrost Subcommittee, 1988). The initial effort was directed towards the preparation of a multi-language index incorporating the primary and secondary terms from the 1988 Glossary, and a number of synonyms. The languages to be covered by the index were to be English, French, German, Spanish, and Russian. Since that time, Italian, Norwegian, and Swedish have been included. The effort was coordinated by the Chair of the Working Group, at the Arctic Institute of North America. (Au)

C
Dictionaries; Electronic data processing; English language; French language; German language; Ground ice; Italian language; Norwegian language; Permafrost; Russian language; Spanish language; Swedish language; Terminology

G02
Arctic regions


Glossary of permafrost and related ground-ice terms   /   Harris, S.A.   French, H.M.   Heginbottom, J.A.   Johnston, G.H.   Ladanyi, B.   Sego, D.C.   van Everdingen, R.O.
Ottawa : National Research Council Canada, 1988.
156 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
(Technical memorandum - National Research Council Canada. Associate Committee on Geotechnical Research (Ottawa), no. 142)
ISBN 0-660-12540-4
References.
ASTIS record 35659.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This Glossary is not intended to be an encyclopaedia concerning the permafrost regions of Canada. Rather it is a list of definitions related to permafrost science and permafrost engineering. The primary objective is to present terms that enjoy common usage in the current literature, with special reference to Canada and Canadian conditions. The Glossary is based upon Permafrost Terminology, a booklet published in December 1974 by the late R.J.E. Brown and W.O. Kupsch. There are, however, several important differences between the present volume and its predecessor. First, the scope of this volume is wider. Although most entries relate directly to the features and processes occurring in permafrost areas, including those related to ground ice, frost action, freezing, thawing and periglacial phenomena, other entries are included because of their importance in permafrost regions even though they are not unique to permafrost regions. This volume also includes as many ground-ice and engineering terms relevant to frozen ground as possible. ... (Au)

C, A
Dictionaries; Engineering; Frost boils; Ground ice; Periglacial landforms; Permafrost

G081
Canadian Arctic


Formation of a jarosite deposit on Cretaceous shales in the Fort Norman area, Northwest Territories   /   Michel, F.A.   van Everdingen, R.O.
(Canadian mineralogist, v. 25, no. 2, June 1987, p. 221-226, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 61395.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

A 5800+ m³ deposit composed primarily of jarosite, 54 km northeast of Fort Norman, N.W.T., is being precipitated as a yellow ochre from an acidic (pH 2.9), iron-bearing groundwater seep. Subsequent weathering of the surficial crust results in alteration of the jarosite to goethite and gypsum. The groundwater chemistry is attained through dissolution of dolomite followed by Ca + Mg for Na + K cation exchange, sulfide oxidation and gypsum precipitation during subsequent migration through a Cretaceous shale unit. (Au)

B, F
Calcium; Composition; Dolomite; Geochemistry; Groundwater; Gypsum; Iron; Isotopes; Jarosite; Magnesium; Measurement; Minerals; Oxygen; Potassium; Pyrite; Shale; Sodium; Sulphates; Sulphur; Water pH; Weathering; X-rays

G0812
Great Bear Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Bear River region, N.W.T.


Oxygen- and sulfur-isotope geochemistry of acidic groundwater discharge in British Columbia, Yukon, and District of Mackenzie, Canada   /   van Everdingen, R.O.   Shakur, M.A.   Michel, F.A.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 22, no. 11, Nov. 1985, p.1689-1695, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 19710.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e85-177
Libraries: ACU

The Paint Pots in Kootenay National Park (British Columbia) appear to derive the Fe, Zn, Pb, and SO4-- contents of their water from sulfide mineralization in Lower and Middle Cambrian carbonates. The Fe, Zn, Ni, and SO4 contents of groundwater discharging into a tributary of Engineer Creek (Yukon) are likely derived from sulfide mineralization in Devonian or Ordovician black shales exposed in the area. The high Fe and SO4-- contents of a natrojarosite deposit northeast of Fort Norman (Northwest Territories) are probably derived from pyritiferous Cretaceous shales in that area. Isotope analyses of water and of dissolved and precipitated sulfur species from these three sites were acidic, heavy-metal-bearing groundwater is being discharged revealed that between 38 and 74% of the oxygen used in the subsurface oxidation of metal sulfides is supplied by H2O molecules rather that by molecular (dissolved) oxygen. The available data also suggest that lower percentages of water oxygen in the secondary sulfates reflect increasing activity of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or similar bacteria in the oxidation process. (Au)

F
Chemical properties; Composition; Groundwater; Isotopes; Oxygen; Springs (Hydrology); Sulphur; Water; Water pH

G0811, G0812, G0821
British Columbia; Engineer Creek, Yukon; Great Bear River region, N.W.T.; N.W.T.; Paint Pots, British Columbia; Yukon


Canadian aquatic resources : current status, future prospects. Chapter 6 : The importance of permafrost in the hydrological regime   /   van Everdingen, R.O.
[Ottawa : National Hydrology Research Institute], 1985.
ii, 54 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
References.
ASTIS record 18367.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Permafrost is defined as ground (soil or rock) with temperatures remaining continuously below 0°C for two or more years. Permafrost occurs in areas with mean annual air temperatures below 0°C, and is generally overlain by a layer of ground of variable thickness, subject to seasonal freezing and thawing, known as the active layer. This chapter explores the influence of permafrost on the various terrestrial components of the hydrological regime. It includes a discussion of the effects of natural and man-induced changes in the extent of permafrost, and some speculation regarding the potential hydrological consequences of widespread changes in the extent of permafrost that might result from changes in climate ... (Au)

F, C
Active layer; Bottom sediments; Erosion; Forest fires; Frozen ground; Geothermal resources; Groundwater; Hydrology; Icings; Lakes; Permafrost; Rivers; Sedimentation

G081
Canadian Arctic


Delta 34S variations in vegetation and soil exposed to intense biogenic sulphide emissions near Paige Mountain, N.W.T., Canada   /   Krouse, H.R.   van Everdingen, R.O.
(Water, air, and soil pollution, v. 23, no. 1, July 1984, p. 61-67, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 61394.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1007/BF00185131
Libraries: ACU

Sulphur isotope abundances demonstrate that natural emissions of biogenic H2S and its oxidation products from springs near Paige Mountain, N.W.T., Canada, can be incorporated into surrounding soil and vegetation. Delta 34S values as low as -33‰ for soil and vegetation are the result of dominant uptake of biogenic atmospheric compounds. In contrast, vegetation on a gypsum outcrop remote from the springs, has delta 34S values as high as +26‰ indicating nearly exclusive derivation of S from the soil. Near the springs, soil with vegetative cover is less depleted in 34S than soil lacking cover. Lower needles on a Black Spruce were found to be less depleted in 34S than the upper needles. These observations suggest that upper foliage exerts a canopy effect on lower foliage and in turn, interception by vegetation reduces the flux of atmospheric S compounds to the soil. Clearly, natural emissions of S compounds can interfere in studies of long range transport of industrial emissions; S isotope analyses might identify such interferences and reduce the chance of misinterpretation. (Au)

F, H, C, E, J
Air pollution; Atmosphere; Atmospheric circulation; Bacteria; Biodegradation; Biological sampling; Black spruces; Gases; Groundwater; Hot springs; Hydrogen sulphide; Isotopes; Ledum; Mass spectrometry; Measurement; Plant cover; Poplars; Soils; Spatial distribution; Sulphur; Sulphur dioxide

G0812
Kelly Lake region, N.W.T.; Norman Wells region, N.W.T.; Paige Mountain region, N.W.T.; Tulita region, N.W.T.


Ground movements and dendrogeomorphology in a small icing area of the Alaska Highway, Yukon, Canada   /   Van Everdingen, R.O.   Allen, H.D.
In: Permafrost : Fourth International Conference, proceedings, July 17-22, 1983. - Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, 1983, p.1292-1297, ill, maps
References.
ASTIS record 15220.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Perennial groundwater discharge in a tributary of Donjek River causes severe icing problems at km 1817.5 (mile post 1130) on the Alaska Highway. Surveys of a section across the icing area revealed vertical ground movements of up to 0.92 m between winter and summer. Subsurface ice bodies up to 0.75 m thick appear to form in some winters, degrading in the following summer(s). The ground movements and the ice bodies are indicative of the formation and degradation of frost mounds. Airphotos of the study area indicate that icing activity was either induced or enhanced by construction of the highway. The distribution of reaction wood in white spruce growing on the valley bottom indicates several episodes of tilting, in various directions. The reaction-wood chronology shows that ground movements occurred in this area long before construction of the highway. Construction of the highway may, however, have affected the rate of groundwater discharge and the magnitude of icing and frost-mound activity. (Au)

C, F, H
Dendrochronology; Erosion; Formation; Frost mounds; Ground ice; Groundwater; Icings; Movement; Seasonal variations; Thawing; Thickness

G0811
Alaska Highway, Yukon; Donjek River region, Yukon


Management of groundwater discharge for the solution of icing problems in the Yukon   /   van Everdingen, R.O.
In: The Roger J.E. Brown memorial volume : proceedings of the fourth Canadian Permafrost Conference = Comptes rendus de la quatrième Conférence canadienne sur la pergélisol : Calgary, Alberta, March 2-6 mars 1981 / Edited by H.M. French. - Ottawa : National Research Council of Canada, 1982, p. 212-226, ill., map
References.
French abstract provided.
ASTIS record 12166.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/cpc/CPC4-212.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Icings fed by perennial discharge of groundwater cause traffic and maintenance problems at several points along the Alaska Highway in the Yukon. At the site investigated in detail (km 1817.5), slightly mineralized groundwater is being discharged at a rate of up to 9.4 m³ per hour. Isotope analyses indicate that the discharge is derived from recent precipitation. During the 1979/1980 winter, ice extended 240 m upstream from the highway, with a maximum thickness of 2.55 m and a total volume of about 14,000 m³, icing covered the highway on several occasions. Maximum predicted icing volume for this site is 33,000 m³, which would increase average thickness by 1.2 m and extend the icing area to about 350 m upstream from the highway. Annual expenditures for icing control at this and other icing sites can be reduced considerably (or eliminated) by improved management of groundwater discharge, through installation of subdrains, through provision of "icing-storage" areas, or some combination of these. (Au)

G, F, E, L, Q, M
Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline Project; Chemical properties; Culverts; Design and construction; Flood control; Groundwater; Ice control; Icings; Isotopes; Maintenance; Mapping; Photography; Precipitation (Meteorology); Roads; Spatial distribution; Stream flow; Thickness

G0811
Alaska Highway, Yukon; Burlap Creek, Yukon; Donjek River, Yukon; Haines Junction region, Yukon; Yukon


Frost blisters of the Bear Rock Spring area near Fort Norman, N.W.T.   /   van Everdingen, R.O.
(Arctic, v. 35, no. 2, June 1982, p. 243-265, ill., figures, map, tables)
References.
ASTIS record 10485.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic35-2-243.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2324
Libraries: ACU

Frost mounds of the frost blister type form every winter at the site of a group of cold mineralized springs on the east side of Bear Rock near Fort Norman, Northwest Territories, Canada. During each of four years of observation (1975-1978) three to five frost blisters formed, with measured heights ranging from 1.4 to 4.9 m, and with horizontal dimensions between 20 and 65 m. Locations of the blisters varied somewhat, presumably in response to differences in temperature regime and snow cover. Mature frost blisters consisted of a layer of frozen ground ... and a layer of ice ... covering a cavity which in some cases was over 4.0 m high. The cavities contained water during formation of the frost blisters; they were empty by spring. Time-lapse photography revealed that frost blisters can grow as fast as 0.55 m/d, and that some of them fracture, drain and partially subside one or more times before reaching their full height. During the summer, degradation occurs as a result of thawing and slumping of the soil cover and by melting and collapse of the ice layer; portions of the ice layer, or an uncollapsed section of a frost blister, can survive until the second summer after their formation. Water chemistry and isotope studies revealed that the frost blisters are formed by pressure build-up in subsurface water below seasonal frost and that the ice layers accumulate by gradual downward freezing in a closed (or intermittently opened) system filled with water derived from the Bear Rock spring system. Similar frost blisters are found in other areas of groundwater discharge in a variety of locations. (Au)

F, C
Frozen ground; Icings; Isotopes; Permafrost; Physical properties; Thawing; Time-lapse photography

G0812
Bear Rock, N.W.T.; Tulita region, N.W.T.


Isotope geochemistry of dissolved, precipitated, airborne, and fallout sulfur species associated with springs near Paige Mountain, Norman Range, N.W.T.   /   van Everdingen, R.O.   Shakur, M.A.   Krouse, H.R.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 19, no. 7, July 1982, p.1395-1407, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 9452.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e82-121
Libraries: ACU

Delta 34S values determined for dissolved sulfate in water discharged by sulfurous springs near Paige Mountain identify gypsum beds in the Lower Devonian Bear Rock Formation as the sulfate source, whereas relatively low delta 18O values show that as much as 30% of the sulfate may have gone through a reduction-re-oxidation cycle. Reduced sulfur species in the spring water have negative delta 34S values as a result of microbiological isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction; airborne sulfur species (H2S, SO2, H2SO4) and gypsum formed through reaction of H2SO4 fallout with exposed carbonate rocks show similar negative delta sulfur 34 values. Negative delta 18O values for the sulfate radical in H2SO4 fallout and in the alteration product indicate that more than half of the oxygen reacting with airborne H2S is derived from water vapour. (Au)

F
Composition; Geochemistry; Hydrogen sulphide; Springs (Hydrology); Sulphates; Sulphur; Water; Water vapour

G0812
Paige Mountain region, N.W.T.


34S and 18O abundances differentiate Upper Cambrian and Lower Devonian gypsum-bearing units, District of Mackenzie, N.W.T. - an update   /   van Everdingen, R.O.   Shakur, M.A.   Krouse, H.R.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 19, no. 6, June 1982, p.1246-1254, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 9061.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e82-106
Libraries: ACU

Previous sulfur isotope data for the Lower Devonian Bear Rock Formation and the Upper Cambrian Saline River Formation in the District of Mackenzie, N.W.T. have been supplemented by additional sulfur isotope analyses as well as delta 18O determinations on sulfates from outcrops, drill cuttings, and cores. Whereas the mean delta 34S value for the Bear Rock Formation is lower than that of the Saline River Formation (+17.8 ±1.8‰ versus +29.7 ±2.2‰), the opposite trend was found for the mean delta 18O values (+ 15.6 ±1.0‰ versus 13.0 ±1.5‰). The new data confirm that, for all samples analysed, there is no overlap between delta 34S values for the two formations, while the delta 18O data display some overlap. The earlier delta 34S data for samples from an evaporitic section on the northeast side of the Norman Range (originally mapped as consisting entirely of Saline River Formation) indicated the presence of a thrust fault in the section, with Saline River strata overlying Bear Rock strata. The delta 18O data for those samples, which fortuitously fall into two non-overlapping groups, confirm the earlier conclusions based on the delta 34S data and allow us to define the position of the thrust-fault contact somewhat more closely. (Au)

B
Cambrian period; Composition; Devonian period; Rocks; Stratigraphy; Sulphates

G0812
N.W.T.


Morphology, hydrology and hydrochemistry of karst in permafrost terrain near Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories   /   van Everdingen, R.O.
Ottawa : National Hydrology Research Institute, Inland Waters Directorate, 1981.
ix, 53p. : figures, maps (fold. in pocket), photos., tables ; 28cm.
(NHRI paper, no. 11)
(Scientific series - Inland Waters Directorate, no. 114)
References.
ASTIS record 8117.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Collapse karst is widespread in the Franklin Mountains, Colville Hills and Great Bear Plain between Great Bear River and 67° N. ... Integrated surface drainage is limited or lacking over portions of the karst area. Hydrologic measurements ... indicate that subsurface runoff may be as high as 40 mm per year or about 15% of the annual precipitation and that rainfall rates as low as 6 mm per day can initiate recharge to the karst-water system. ... Seasonal flooding of karst depressions may cause problems for future engineering developments in the region .... The karst-water system is extremely vulnerable to contamination from the surface because of the close spacing of high-rate recharge points and the unfiltered nature of the recharge. Once a contaminant has entered the karst-water system, rapid subsurface transport will make containment, recovery and cleanup after an accidental spill difficult or impossible. (Au)

A, F, C
Floods; Hydrology; Karst; Permafrost; Poljes (Geomorphology); Precipitation (Meteorology); Water pollution

G0812
Great Bear Lake region, N.W.T.


Potential interactions between pipelines and terrain in a northern environment   /   Van Everdingen, R.O.
Ottawa : National Hydrology Research Institute, 1979.
v, 7 p. : ill., fold. table ; 28cm.
(NHRI paper, no. 8)
(Technical bulletin - Canada. Inland Waters Directorate, no. 114)
ISBN 0-662-10757-8
References.
Also available in French under title: Interactions potentielles entre le pipeline et le sol dans les régions du Nord.
ASTIS record 3370.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In a northern environment various interactions between pipelines and the terrain which they cross may produce adverse effects on pipeline integrity; adverse effects on the environment may also result, either directly or as a consequence of the increased maintenance or repairs required. ... the interactions and the severity of their effects will depend on the pipeline construction mode (e.g. buried or above-ground) and operation mode (e.g. chilled or warm); on the distribution of frozen and nonfrozen ground; and on the relative sensitivity of the ground during freezing and/or thawing. Most of the interactions are related to the occurrence and movement of surface water and subsurface water or to the occurrence or formation of ice. A tabulation of possible interactions and effects is presented as a guide to the potential problems that may occur during the construction and operation, as well as after abandonment, of a pipeline. When recognized early enough, development of such problems can often be avoided by rerouting or prevented by special design measures. Early recognition can in most cases only be achieved through special studies on groundwater levels, flow rates and temperatures; on the occurrence of icings; and on the distribution and character of gound ice. (Au)

Q, J, F, A
Design and construction; Embankments; Environmental impacts; Erosion; Frost heaving; Gas pipelines; Ground ice; Groundwater; Icings; Permafrost; Petroleum pipelines; Slopes; Thaw settlement; Thawing

G081
Canadian Arctic


Automatic time-lapse camera systems   /   Banner, J.A.   van Everdingen, R.O.
Ottawa : National Hydrology Research Institute, 1979.
v, 20p. : ill., figures, photos. ; 28cm.
(NHRI paper, no. 4)
(Technical bulletin - Canada. Inland Waters Directorate, no. 112)
ISBN 0-662-10691-1
References.
ASTIS record 3369.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This report provides construction and operation details for the automatic time-lapse camera system that was developed and used to monitor natural phenomena in northern Canada. Modified Eastman Kodak KB9A 16-mm strike-recording motion picture cameras were used in this system. Some of the results obtained with the system are presented and discussed. Suggestions for the adaptation of other cameras for time-lapse photography are also given. (Au)

X
Time-lapse photography

G0812
Canadian Arctic; Tulita, N.W.T.


Use of long-term automatic time-lapse photography to measure the growth of frost blisters   /   van Everdingen, R.O.   Banner, J.A.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 16, no. 8, Aug. 1979, p.1632-1634)
References.
ASTIS record 2802.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e79-149
Libraries: ACU

The use of automatic time-lapse camera systems, taking daily photographs at solar noon between 26 September 1977 and 3 May 1978, has made it possible to determine the time and rate of growth of frost blisters at Bear Rock near Fort Norman, N.W.T. The daily negatives have been printed and refilmed to produce a time-lapse motion picture covering the full 220 day observation period. The use of paired cameras allowed production and viewing of daily stereo pairs. (Au)

C
Frost action; Soils

G0812
Tulita, N.W.T.


Frost gauges and freezing gauges   /   Banner, J.A.   Van Everdingen, R.O.
Ottawa : National Hydrology Research Institute, 1979.
v, 18p. : figures, table ; 28cm.
(Technical bulletin - Canada. Inland Waters Directorate, no. 110)
(NHRI paper, no. 3)
ISBN 0-662-10535-4
References.
ASTIS record 2413.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Several types of frost gauges to detect frost (temperatures at or below 0°C) and several types of freezing gauges to determine the occurrence and extent of soil freezing (conversion of soil moisture from liquid to solid) were designed and constructed. The multisensor electrical-resistance freezing gauges enable determination of the progress, with time, of freezing and thawing in both saturated and unsaturated soils. ... Computer-generated plots of resistance vs. depth and time are used in the interpretation of the data. Best results are obtained when freezing gauges with small electrode spacings, installed directly in the soil, are measured daily. (Au)

C
Frost penetration; Measurement; Soil freezing

G16


Central Yukon-Alaska   /   Hughes, O.L.   Van Everdingen, R.O.
s.l. : s.n., 1978.
32p. : ill., maps ; 22cm.
In: Field trip guidebook - International Conference on Permafrost, 3rd, Edmonton, Alberta, July 10-13, 1978, no. 1
References.
ASTIS record 3719.
Languages: English

Describes features to be noted on an eight-day field trip Edmonton - Whitehorse - Dawson - Fairbanks - TAPS Haul Road. Covers the geology, periglacial and permafrost features of the Ogilvie Mountains and Dawson. Outlines historic and current placer mining practices in permafrost conditions. (ASTIS)

C, W
Geology; Hydraulic mining; Mining engineering; Permafrost; Travels

G0811, G06
Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon; Yukon


Stratigraphic differentiation by sulfur isotopes between Upper Cambrian and Lower Devonian gypsum-bearing units, District of Mackenzie, N.W.T.   /   van Everdingen, R.O.   Krouse, H.R.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 14, no. 12, Dec. 1977, p. 2790-2796, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 61393.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e77-245
Libraries: ACU

Sulfur isotope analyses of gypsum in outcrop and subsurface samples from the Lower Devonian Bear Rock Formation gave delta 34S values ranging from +10.3 to +21.8‰ (mean +16.1‰, standard deviation 2.85‰); samples from the Upper Cambrian Saline River Formation gave delta 34S values ranging from +24.7 to +40.2‰ (mean +30.3‰, standard deviation 3.65‰). The lower portion of one outcrop section of 532 ft (162.2 m) on the northeast side of the Norman Range (Franklin Mountains), mapped as Saline River Formation, showed anomalous delta 34S values (+10.3 ±18.7‰), suggesting correlation with the Bear Rock Formation. It is likely that at least 97 ft (29.6 m) of Bear Rock strata are present in this section, overlain by a maximum of 435 ft (132.6 m) of gypsiferous Saline River strata that form the base of the main thrust plate of the Norman Range in this locality. (Au)

B, F
Cambrian period; Carbonate rocks; Cores; Devonian period; Faults (Geology); Groundwater; Gypsum; Isotopes; Mass spectrometry; Measurement; Minerals; Stratigraphy; Sulphur

G0812
Bear Rock region, N.W.T.; Blackwater River region, N.W.T.; Bloody River region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Franklin Mountains, N.W.T.; Mackenzie River region, N.W.T.; Moon Lake region, N.W.T.; Norman Range, N.W.T.; Paige Mountain region, N.W.T.; Whitefish River region, N.W.T.


Geocryological terminology   /   van Everdingen, R.O.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 13, no. 6, June 1976, p. 862-867, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 61392.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e76-089
Libraries: ACU

Ambiguity and inconsistent use of the word "frozen" and a number of related terms present problems in terminology describing permafrost and seasonal frost. To overcome some of these problems, the author proposes that use of the word "frozen" be reserved exclusively for cases where at least some ice is present in the soil/water system. A new term, "cryotic", is proposed to indicate that the temperature of the soil/water system is below 0 °C, without implying any phase conditions. Other terms dealt with are liquid water content, ice-rich, frost-sensitive, thaw-sensitive, frost-stable, and thaw-stable. A partially genetic terminology is proposed to describe various types of nonfrozen zones in permafrost areas. (Au)

C, F
Frozen ground; Ground ice; Groundwater; Interstitial water; Mechanical properties; Permafrost; Seasonal variations; Soil freezing; Soil mechanics; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Soil texture; Strength; Thaw settlement; Thawing; Thermal regimes; Unfrozen water content of frozen ground; Unfrozen water content of permafrost; Water vapour

G081, G01
Canadian Arctic; Polar regions


Terrain evaluation with respect to pipeline construction, Mackenzie transportation corridor, southern part, lat. 60° to 64° N   /   Geological Survey of Canada. Terrain Sciences Division   Rutter, N.W.   Boydell, A.N.   Savigny, K.W.   Canada. Hydrology Research Division   van Everdingen, R.O.   Environmental-Social Program, Northern Pipelines (Canada) [Sponsor]
Ottawa, Information Canada, 1973.
iv, 135 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Environmental-Social Committee Northern Pipelines, Task Force on Northern Oil Development report, no. 73- 36)
Report and four folded maps in case.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 27424.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU OORD

This report deals with the Mackenzie Valley and surrounding regions from the Provincial boundary at Latitude 60, northward about 250 miles to Latitude 64. The area consists of plains with broad uplands in the southern and eastern portions and rugged mountains in the west. In the south, the Mackenzie River winds its way toward the west, is joined by the Liard River near Fort Simpson, then continues westward to the base of the Nahanni Range where it swings north and occupies, for the most part, a broad valley between the Mackenzie and Franklin Mountains. Moraine consisting of till is by far the most abundant surficial deposit and covers most of the plains and upland areas. Fine-grained lacustrine sediments cover wide areas adjacent to the Mackenzie River in the southern and northernmost areas. Eolian sand, glacial and post-glacial fluvial sand and gravel make up most of the remainder of surficial deposits. ... (Au)

A, B, C, Q
Drainage; Frost action; Gas pipelines; Geology; Geomorphology; Glacial geology; Gravel; Ground ice; Location; Mackenzie Valley Pipeline; Mass wasting; Moisture content of frozen ground; Moraines; Permafrost; Rivers; Sand; Sediments (Geology); Soils; Spatial distribution

G0812
Mackenzie River region, N.W.T.; N.W.T.


Terrain evaluation with respect to pipeline construction, Mackenzie transportation corridor, central part, lat. 64° to 68° N   /   Geological Survey of Canada. Terrain Sciences Division   Hughes, O.L.   Canada. Hydrology Research Division   van Everdingen, R.O.   Environmental-Social Program, Northern Pipelines (Canada) [Sponsor]
Ottawa : Information Canada, 1973.
vi, 74 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Environmental-Social Committee Northern Pipelines, Task Force on Northern Oil Development report, no. 73- 37)
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 27415.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU OORD

... Within the glaciated area, terrain conditions are determined mainly by the character and distribution of glacial and post-glacial deposits, together with permafrost and ground ice conditions. Till plains constitute more than half of the glaciated area. Rolling to hummocky moraine forms a discontinuous belt in Peel Plateau adjacent to Mackenzie and Richardson Mountains, and from Fort McPherson generally eastward beyond the limit of mapping. Glaciolacustrine plains form a belt of highly variable width along Mackenzie River from the southern boundary of the report area almost to Arctic Red River. Numerous additional small areas of glaciolacustrine sediments, many too small to differentiate at original mapping scale of 1:125,000, occur within or adjacent to areas of rolling to hummocky moraine. ... Both texture and ice content of alluvial deposits vary over a wide range, from gravel of the active channels of high energy streams, typically unfrozen, to ice-rich silt of thermokarst alluvial floodplains, so that no generalization is possible. Sand and gravel of glaciofluvial deposits are the most stable surficial materials of the area. Polygonal ice-wedge networks may occur in glaciofluvial plains in the northern fringe of the area, but should present no significant environmental problems. However, glaciofluvial plains situated adjacent to glaciolacustrine plains are commonly underlain in part by ice-rich silt and clay. Valley walls of streams incised through the glaicofluvial sand and gravel into the underlying silt and clay are potentially highly unstable. ... (Au)

A, B, Q
Design and construction; Drainage; Gas pipelines; Geomorphology; Glacial geology; Gravel; Location; Mackenzie Valley Pipeline; Moraines; Permafrost; Rivers; Sand; Sediments (Geology); Soils; Thermokarst

G0812
N.W.T.


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