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The ASTIS database cites the following 6 publication(s) by Patricia Wells. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Acknowledging our past editor   /   Wells, P.J.
(Arctic, v. 71, no. 3, Sept. 2018, p. iii)
Open access.
ASTIS record 84561.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4736
Libraries: ACU

I approach my first issue as editor of the journal Arctic with great trepidation, not only because this venerable publication has, for almost 80 years, published the works of some of the greatest Arctic scientists and social scientists, but also because I am following in the footsteps of Karen McCullough, an extraordinarily competent editor, whose example is simultaneously an inspiration and the source of my apprehension. Many of the journal's authors and readers are familiar with Karen's editorial work, but few know how Karen's background prepared her for working on this multidisciplinary Arctic publication. As she departs from the front of house at the Arctic Institute of North America, I would like to share a little about how Karen became such a brilliant editor. Karen studied archaeology, a discipline that borrows ideas from other disciplines and searches them for answers to questions about what motivated people in the past. Knowledge of geomorphology, palaeo-environments, animal ecology, ocean currents, and of course social sciences was a necessary part of any archaeological scholar's interest in contextualizing human intentions. In 1978, while completing her MA on Iroquoian history at the University of Calgary, Karen spent her first field season in the Arctic. In the Bache Peninsula region of Ellesmere Island, she discovered some of the earliest pre-contact Inuit (Thule) settlements, and she went on to spend 15 seasons in the region surveying and excavating sites. The early years of this work formed the basis of her PhD research, which had a significant impact on our understanding of when the Inuit first settled the eastern Arctic, the nature of that settlement, and their initial contact with Europeans. Some of this work, including The Ruin Islanders: Early Thule Culture Pioneers in the Eastern High Arctic (1989), was published by the Canadian Museum of History. One long-term result of Karen's research was the building of strong and enduring cooperation with Danish colleagues in Greenland. ... (Au)

L, U
Archaeology; Arctic Institute of North America; Communication; Inuit archaeology; Publishing; Research

G02, G0813
Arctic regions; Bache Peninsula region, Nunavut


Some unique bone, antler and ivory artefacts from Phillip’s Garden (EeBi-1), a Dorset Paleo-Inuit settlement in northwestern Newfoundland   /   Wells, P.J.
(Arctic, v. 71, no. 3, Sept. 2018, p. 355-359, ill., maps)
References.
Open access.
ASTIS record 84542.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4742
Libraries: ACU

Introduction: The first people of Arctic Canada and Greenland entered the region from northwestern Alaska and quickly spread eastward around 4500 years ago. For more than 3000 years, they moved throughout this vast area, taking advantage of the seasonal availability of vital resources that arrived fairly predictably in different locations. In this largely treeless region with poor soils and a short growing season, people relied upon animals for food, fur, sinew, fat for fuel, and the raw materials from which to manufacture tools. Not surprisingly, the ecology of animal species determined much of people's settlement and migration patterns. … In this essay, I present three object types that were identified in a larger technological study of a Dorset PaleoInuit bone, antler, and ivory tool assemblage from Phillip's Garden (EeBi-1) on the coast of western Newfoundland (Fig. 1) (Wells, 2012; Wells and Renouf, 2014; Wells et al., 2014). My goal is to bring these obscure objects forward for consideration by others interested in the development and distribution of material culture traditions among the Paleo-Inuit. (Au)

U, N, I, V
Antlers; Artifacts; Bones; Culture (Anthropology); Dorset culture; History; Hunting; Inuit archaeology; Ivory; Seals (Animals)

G0827
Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland


Dorset culture bone and antler tool reproductions using replica lithics : report on the identification of some possible manufacture traces on osseous tools from Phillip’s Garden, Newfoundland   /   Wells, P.J.   Renouf, M.A.P.   Rast, T.
(Canadian journal of archaeology, v. 38, no. 2, 2014, p. 394-423, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 82214.
Languages: English

This report describes a project to reproduce four Dorset Culture osseous (bone and antler) tools common at the Phillip's Garden site (EeBi-1), northwestern Newfoundland. Replicas of Dorset lithic tools were used to manufacture a needle, a barbed point, a harpoon head and a foreshaft-like tool. The characteristic traces generated on the osseous tools in the manufacture process were documented and compared, under low-power magnification, to archaeological examples of the same tools. There were some differences, but many similarities were noted in the comparisons. The project outcomes suggest the tentative identification of possible manufacture traces on archaeological material associated with the use of particular lithic tools, and include an evaluation of the capacities of some Dorset lithics in tool making. These results present tangible traces of Dorset tool making that suggest some conventional practices at Phillip's Garden, and demonstrate potential for expanding this enquiry to understand change and endurance in practices throughout the broader Dorset region. (Au)

V, I, U
Animal distribution; Antlers; Artifacts; Bones; Culture (Anthropology); Dorset culture; Heritage sites; Middens (Archaeology); Spatial distribution; Temporal variations

G0827
Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland


Social life and technical practice : an analysis of the osseous tool assemblage at the dorset palaeoeskimo site of Philip's Garden, Newfoundland   /   Wells, P.J.   Renouf, P. [Supervisor]
St. John's, Nfld. : Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2012.
xxxiv, 399 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
ISBN 9780494879696
Thesis (Ph.D.).
References.
Appendices.
ASTIS record 82122.
Languages: English
Web: http://research.library.mun.ca/6191/
Web: http://research.library.mun.ca/6191/3/Wells_PatriciaJean.pdf
Libraries: OONL

The aim of this thesis is to provide an understanding of the social nature of technological life at Phillip's Garden (EeBi-1), a large Middle Dorset site in northwestern Newfoundland. This is accomplished through the analysis of its osseous (bone, antler and ivory) tool industry. The assemblage is systematically presented providing morphological details for tool types, variation in forms and materials selected for their manufacture. In addition, the frequency of tool forms is recorded over the temporal and spatial extent of the site, and evidence of their manufacture and use is explored. Technological practice is defined in a thoroughly inclusive way, not simply as the material outcome of production, but immersed in social action that reinforces relationships among people, the materials they manipulate and the settings of technological events. The results of this analysis reveal a dynamic and unique community at Phillip's Garden where occupants transformed, over the course of its occupation, some practices of material acquisition, manufacture and use, dwelling occupation, tool making, and hunting. (Au)

U, V, I
Antlers; Artifacts; Bones; Culture (Anthropology); Dorset culture; Hunting; Ivory; Palaeoeskimo culture; Theses

G0827
Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland


Ritual activity and the formation of faunal assemblages at two Groswater palaeoeskimo sites at Port au Choix   /   Wells, P.J.
(The cultural landscapes of Port au Choix / Edited by M.A.P. Renouf. Interdisciplinary contributions to archaeology, 2011, ch. 4, p. 65-89, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 82215.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-8324-4_4

Introduction - Faunal assemblages from archaeological contexts are usually viewed as the remains of consumption that offer insights into past cultural behaviour such as hunting, processing, transporting and scavenging. However, faunal remains can also provide information about the ritual treatment of animal remains (Jones O’Day et al. 2004; Muir and Driver 2004; Murray 2000; Renouf 2000). This paper presents a comparative examination of faunal remains from middens at two nearby Groswater Palaeoeskimo sites on the Point Riche peninsula in northwestern Newfoundland, Phillip’s Garden West (EeBi-11) and Phillip’s Garden East (EeBi-1) (Renouf 2005; Wells 2002). Animal exploitation at these temporally overlapping settlements was focused almost exclusively on seal hunting, particularly of the huge harp seal populations that still frequent these waters each late fall and spring (see Murray, Chap. 11). The stone tool assemblage at Phillip’s Garden West deviates substantially from typical forms. Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of this particular morphological variant have been presented by Renouf (2005) and Ryan (Chap. 5; see also Melnik 2007 for further discussion). ... (Au)

V, I, J, U
Animal distribution; Artifacts; Bones; Culture (Anthropology); Dorset culture; Heritage sites; Human ecology; Hunting; Middens (Archaeology); Palaeoeskimo culture; Radiocarbon dating; Sealing; Seals (Animals); Temporal variations

G0827
Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland


Animal exploitation and season of occupation at the Groswater Palaeoeskimo site of Phillip’s Garden West   /   Wells, P.J.
(Newfoundland and Labrador studies, v. 20, no. 1, 2005, p. 75-90, maps)
References.
ASTIS record 82123.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Introduction: Animal bones from archaeological sites can contribute to an understanding of past cultures. Determining what species were exploited and during what season(s) enables a discussion of the settlement and subsistence practices of prehistoric populations. This paper examines faunal remains from the Groswater Palaeoeskimo site of Phillip's Garden West (EeBi-11) at Port au Choix (Figure 1). Its aim is to understand the nature of site occupation and hunting activities that took place there. While authors have suggested models for Groswater Palaeoeskimo site placement and the animals likely exploited (Fitzhugh 1972; Loring and Cox 1986), there are only a few sites from which faunal remains have been recovered and analyzed, and which can therefore test these models. Evidence from faunal remains collected at Phillip's Garden East (EeBi-1) and Factory Cove (DlBk-3) further south on the Great Northern Peninsula (Figure 1) show a strong focus on seal hunting supplemented by small amounts of fish, birds and terrestrial mammals (Auger 1985; Kennett 1991). Phillip's Garden West is unique in the Groswater archaeological record because a number of the stone tool types found here morphologically differ from tools typical of this culture (Ryan 1997; Renouf 2005). For instance, endblades and bifaces are often much longer and thinner than typical examples, and display unusually fine edge serration and surface grinding (Renouf 2005). One tentative explanation for the difference is that this site was occupied during a different season from other Groswater sites in the region (Renouf 1994), thereby necessitating a different kind of tool kit. Identification of the faunal remains from this site will establish the species exploited and at what time of year. In addition, a review of the ecology of these species will allow a discussion of Groswater hunting practices. ... (Au)

U, V, I, J
Animal distribution; Artifacts; Bones; Ethnography; Heritage sites; Human ecology; Hunting; Inuit archaeology; Palaeoeskimo culture; Radiocarbon dating; Sealing; Seasonal variations; Subsistence; Temporal variations

G0827
Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland


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