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The ASTIS database cites the following 20 publication(s) by Allice Legat. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Modeling cumulative effects in Barren-ground caribou range : proceedings of a workshop in Yellowknife, February 2008   /   Adamczewski, J.   Nishi, J.   Gunn, A.   Antoniuk, T.   Johnson, C.   Russell, D.   Blondin, T.   Legat, A.   Beaulieu, D.   Virgl, J.   Chocolate Pasquayak, M.   Wooley, B.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Government of the Northwest Territories, 2013.
viii, 82 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Manuscript report - Northwest Territories. Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources, no. 233)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Cover title.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 80421.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/_live/documents/content/233_manuscript.pdf

The declines in caribou populations between 1996 and 2006 aroused considerable concern in NWT communities because caribou have been a resource of great value to people in the north for many generations. Possible explanations for the declines include: a natural cycle, variation in weather and forage conditions, predation, hunting, disease, and industrial development. Of these factors, some are beyond immediate control, but effects due to direct human influence, like hunting and development, can be managed. The impact of development on caribou is usually not due to single roads, mines, cut-blocks or seismic lines; rather, it is the cumulative effect of many habitat alterations over time that affects caribou numbers and distribution. Concerns over effects of development on caribou have been raised in environmental assessments, particularly by Aboriginal groups, for many years, but progress on assessing them has been limited. To be objective, assessment of cumulative effects must account for other factors, including hunting and natural variation in weather. Due to the need for overall knowledge of a caribou herd's complex ecology in assessing cumulative effects, biologists have turned to computer models to help track multiple variables and relationships, and to look at "what if" simulations. While these models cannot predict the future, they can help users understand how various factors interact and what likely consequences of particular management decisions might be. In the 2006-2010 NWT Caribou Management Strategy, a commitment was made by the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) to develop a modeling approach that could assess the impacts of development in its proper context of natural variation. In this report we summarize the presentations and participant responses at a public workshop held in February 2008, Yellowknife, NWT, on modeling cumulative effects in the range of the Bathurst herd. In addition, we report on progress towards a demonstration project initiated at the February 2008 workshop. (Au)

I, N, E, J, T, P
Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal health; Animal migration; Animal population; Animal reproduction; Bioclimatology; Caribou; Climate change; Co-management; Cumulative effects; Diamonds; Economic development; Effects monitoring; Energy budgets; Environmental impacts; Forest fires; Hunting; Insects; Land use; Mathematical models; Mining; Native peoples; Risk assessment; Seasonal variations; Temporal variations; Traditional knowledge; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G0812, G0813
Bathurst Inlet region, Nunavut; Detah region, N.W.T.; Martre, Lac la, region, N.W.T.; Rae Lake region, N.W.T.; Reliance region, N.W.T.; Snare Lake region, N.W.T.; Yellowknife region, N.W.T.


Walking the land, feeding the fire : knowledge and stewardship among the Tlicho Dene   /   Legat, A.
Tucson, Arizona : University of Arizona Press, c2012.
xxii, 231 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
(First peoples : new directions in indigenous studies)
ISBN 9780816530092
References.
Forward by Joanne Barnaby.
Glossary: p. 207-211.
ASTIS record 79729.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

"This book offers important ethnographic detail and analysis of how elders' articulation and dissemination of important knowledge is connected to specific places in the land. Even more importantly, Legat's ethnography shows readers the possibilities of an ethnogaphic methodology that is not prededermined by conventional Western academic standards." For the Tlicho Dene, Indigenous peoples of Canada's Northwest Territories, knowledge is produced and rooted in the land. In Walking the Land, Feeding the Fire, Allice Legat approaches her work as a community partner, providing unique insight and understanding available only through traditional knowledge. Her powerful methodology will impact the way research is conducted for decades to come. (Au)

T, J, R, S
Auroras; Birches; Caribou; Culture (Anthropology); Customs; Dogrib Indians; Dogrib Treaty 11 Council; Elders; Epistemology; Ethnography; Geographical names; Government relations; Handicrafts; Human ecology; Land; Legends; Native land claims; Participatory action research; Political action; Recreation; Traditional knowledge; Winter ecology; Youth

G0812
N.W.T.


Claudette Reed Upton-Keeley (1948-2008)   /   Legat, A.
(Arctic, v. 62, no. 2, June 2009, p. 251-252, portrait)
ASTIS record 67229.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic62-2-251.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic143
Libraries: ACU

On 12 October 2008, Claudette Reed Upton-Keeley passed away in Georgetown Hospital, on Grand Cayman Island. Claudette is remembered as a thoughtful human being, with whom we all delighted in spending time. Her respect and enjoyment of diversity enabled her, as editor, activist, friend, feminist, idea person, and organizer, to care equally for people, wildlife, and the environment, whether in Alaska, the Yukon, Alberta, or the Caribbean. ... Claudette moved to Anchorage, Alaska, where she became employed with the Arctic Institute of North America (AINA) in 1975. During the winter, she administered AINA's Anchorage office, and in summer, she supported the scientists at the AINA research station in Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory, in a number of ways. She served delicious food at the beginning and end of each day and challenged the researchers with refreshing ideas and curiosity about their research. In 1977, she married Philip P. Upton, a senior pilot with AINA. They continued working at the field station during the summer, but moved from Anchorage to Calgary to work at the AINA headquarters at the University of Calgary. In Calgary, Claudette became the production editor of Arctic. She worked closely with honorary editor Len Hills from 1979 until 1983, when she became acting editor and then editor, a position she held until early 1985. Claudette's skill as a professional editor helped Arctic become the renowned journal it is today. ... Claudette reached into many different sectors of our society and touched people because she cared. She became an exceptional editor by caring about the best expression of others' thoughts; she guided the agencies and boards she worked with to achieve their mandates while respecting the views of others by caring about the people's choices; and she supported individuals in achieving their potential by caring about and nurturing relationships. In every aspect of her life, she had a remarkable ability to bring disparate people together and inspire them to work toward outcomes, earning their respect through her calm, intelligent, and reasonable presentation. ... We will all remember her. (Au)

Y, J, R
Arctic Institute of North America; Biographies; Human rights; Natural area preservation; Political action; Publishing; Serials; Upton-Keeley, Claudette Reed, 1948-2008; Wilderness areas; Women

G0811, G0822, G06
Anchorage, Alaska; Calgary, Alberta; Kluane National Park and Reserve, Yukon


Putting our knowledge to work building on our strengths : a discussion paper   /   Barnaby, J.   Emery, A.   Legat, A.
[N.W.T.] : Joanne Barnaby, [2003].
11 leaves ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
For further information or to get a copy of the Traditional Needs Assessment, please contact Joanne Barnaby at: phone: (867) 874-3045; e-mail: jvbarnaby@yahoo.com.
ASTIS record 53329.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The purpose of this discussion paper is to advance the development of a training and educational program to increase the effective use of traditional knowledge in the management of northern resources. Often the decisions and recommendations called for in environmental assessments, resource management and development projects are framed by science and technology and within fiscal restraints. These decisions have a profound affect on the lives and welfare of aboriginal people. Aboriginal communities often do not have the capacity to operate in a scientific framework, and despite the best efforts of ail involved, the distinct knowledge of Aboriginal people and their recommendations are rarely understood and are under-utilized. A needs assessment was done to pinpoint what skills and expertise are required to ensure that the knowledge of Aboriginal people is understood and used fully in the development process and in managing resources in the North. This discussion paper presents a summary introduction to the issues as well as the results of the needs assessment as a focus for a discussion about possible solutions that can be implemented. The problem statement and suggested solutions are derived from a combination of experiences of many people and a series of specific questions addressed by major northern stakeholders regarding the problems and solutions of using traditional knowledge successfully in development and management of northern resources. (Au)

R, T, N, S
Co-management; Culture (Anthropology); Curricula; Effects monitoring; Elders; Government; Higher education; Industries; Land use; Management; Natural resources; Occupational training; Planning; Research; Research organizations; Science; Traditional knowledge

G0812
N.W.T.


Dogrib knowledge on placenames [sic], caribou and habitat : final report   /   Dogrib Treaty 11 Council   Saxon, L. [Principal Investigator]   Zoe, S.A. [Researcher and GIS Entry]   Chocolate, G. [Researcher]   Legat, A. [Project Director]   West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society [Sponsor]
[Yellowknife, N.W.T. : WKSS], 2002.
ii, 175 p. ; 28 cm.
The photos and maps have not been included in this PDF file.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 52295.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/_live/pages/wpPages/West_Kitikmeot_Slave_Study.aspx

This project is a continuation of the studies funded by the West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society on placenames as indicators of bio-geographical knowledge, and caribou and the state of their habitat. In order to record and document places and placenames in the Dogrib traditional territory, the research team conducted interviews with elders in the Dogrib communities and documented both the placenames and the stories the elders shared. Although the research team wished to conduct additional research on traditional laws and rules associated with caribou and to test a monitoring plan, the elders wished to provide and give more detail on placenames, particularly those associated with water. As originally suggested by the Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee, information on water as well as caribou and heritage must be documented in order to manage and monitor Dogrib lands. One of the main results of the study was that placenames indicate profound knowledge of geography, land formations and waterways in particular. Many of the placenames for waterways indicate water flow, water conditions, watersheds and the relationship between land, water, wildlife, and people. There is also frequent use of landmarks to identify other named places; for example when two or more places in the study area have the same name, landmarks are often used as identifiers. Throughout the report emphasis is placed on the importance of consistent and accurate spellings in the analysis of placenames (for understanding bio-geographical knowledge). Three principles were followed for selecting spellings in order to maintain consistency and accuracy: a) use the principles [found in] ... A Dogrib Dictionary, b) use the spellings that match the dialect used by people who live in the area of the named place, c) match the spelling to a commonly used pronunciation. (Au)

T, V, A, N, F
Caribou; Culture (Anthropology); Customs; Dogrib Indians; Dogrib language; Elders; Environmental protection; Epistemology; Geographical names; Hunting; Landforms; Mapping; Native land claims; Oral history; Participatory action research; Rivers; Safety; Social surveys; Stream flow; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy; Trails; Watersheds; Wildlife habitat

G0812, G0813
Artillery Lake region, N.W.T.; Artillery Lake, N.W.T.; Aylmer Lake region, N.W.T.; Aylmer Lake, N.W.T.; Contwoyto Lake region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Contwoyto Lake, N.W.T./Nunavut; Fort Resolution, N.W.T.; Fort Smith, N.W.T.; Gamètì, N.W.T.; Gras, Lac de, N.W.T.; Gras, Lac de, region, N.W.T.; Great Bear Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Bear Lake, N.W.T.; Great Slave Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Slave Lake, N.W.T.; Itchen Lake region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Itchen Lake, N.W.T./Nunavut; North Slave Region, N.W.T.; Rae, N.W.T.; Yellowknife, N.W.T.


Habitat of Dogrib traditional territory : placenames as indicators of biogeographical knowledge : final report   /   Dogrib Treaty 11 Council   Legat, A. [Research Director]   Chocolate, G. [Researcher]   Chocolate, M. [Researcher and Language Coordinator]   Zoe, S.A. [GIS Administrator]   West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society [Sponsor]
In: WKSS : West Kitikmeot/Slave Study : final report 1996-2001 / West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society. - Yellowknife, N.W.T. : WKSS, 2002, [92] p., ill.
Due to the size of this report, the photos and maps have not been included in this web version.
Indexed from a CD.
Also available from the web.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 45328.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/_live/pages/wpPages/West_Kitikmeot_Slave_Study.aspx
Libraries: ACU

The long-term objectives of the Place Names as Indicators of Biogeographical Knowledge project have been: to identify and map habitat within the Mowhì Gogha Dènutl'èe; to provide the West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society and the Dogrib communities with baseline data to develop management strategies to monitor the cumulative impact from industrial development; and to provide an understanding of similarities and differences between scientific and Dogrib habitat classification systems. These objectives have been pursued in several ways. Initially the research staff looked at data from past Dogrib traditional knowledge projects, initiated field work in the study area, and compared the findings with satellite imagery data collected by the Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development Department of the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT). In addition, other information from the GNWT, the Dene Cultural Institute, the Arctic Institute of North America, and the Dogrib Treaty 11 Council was examined and transferred to a Geographic Information System database. At the same time the project research team focused on gathering information to determine the conceptual and literal meanings of Dogrib place names as indicators of bio-geographical knowledge. The team also started documenting habitat types and associated flora and fauna, and did a literature search on indigenous environmental knowledge studies concerned with bio-diversity, habitat and place names. Throughout the project the information suggested that Dogrib traditional place names indicate essential information about the water flow, landscape and bio-diversity of the sites, which provides people with information about the land, waterways and resources which allow them to survive while participating in the main task of hunting caribou. The knowledge both of place names and the associated habitat forms a basis for monitoring cumulative effects, particularly to the cultural and physical environment. (Au)

T, V, A, N, I, H, J, P
Animal distribution; Caribou; Classification; Co-management; Cumulative effects; Dogrib Indians; Dogrib language; Effects monitoring; Environmental impacts; Epistemology; Fishes; Gender differences; Geographical names; Hunting; Mapping; Mining; Occupational training; Oral history; Plant distribution; Research; Satellite photography; Science; Subsistence; Taiga ecology; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy; Wildlife habitat

G0812, G0813
Artillery Lake region, N.W.T.; Artillery Lake, N.W.T.; Aylmer Lake region, N.W.T.; Aylmer Lake, N.W.T.; Contwoyto Lake region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Contwoyto Lake, N.W.T./Nunavut; Fort Resolution, N.W.T.; Fort Smith, N.W.T.; Gamètì, N.W.T.; Gras, Lac de, N.W.T.; Gras, Lac de, region, N.W.T.; Great Bear Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Bear Lake, N.W.T.; Great Slave Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Slave Lake, N.W.T.; Itchen Lake region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Itchen Lake, N.W.T./Nunavut; North Slave Region, N.W.T.; Rae, N.W.T.; Yellowknife, N.W.T.


Caribou migration patterns and the state of their habitat : final report   /   Dogrib Treaty 11 Council   Legat, A. [Research Director]   Chocolate, G. [Researcher]   Gon, B. [Researcher]   Zoe, S.A. [GIS Administrator]   Chocolate, M. [Dogrib Language Coordinator]   West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society [Sponsor]
In: WKSS : West Kitikmeot/Slave Study : final report 1996-2001 / West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society. - Yellowknife, N.W.T. : WKSS, 2002, [117] p.
Indexed from a CD.
Appendices are listed and titled, but the information, much of which contains maps, is missing from the PDF file, due to the size of this report.
References.
Also available from the Web.
ASTIS record 44603.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/_live/pages/wpPages/West_Kitikmeot_Slave_Study.aspx
Libraries: ACU

The Tlicho (Dogrib) state that they and the caribou have a very close and respectful relationship. Respect is shown by only taking what is needed, using all parts of the harvested animals, and discarding any unused parts in respectful ways. Respect is also shown by having and sharing knowledge of the caribou. A lack of knowledge, and therefore respect, will result in the caribou migrating elsewhere and a population decline. Tlicho knowledge is collected through harvesting activities, verified through discussions with other harvesters and elders, and shared through oral narratives in association with the general truths such as: Caribou have unpredictable migration patterns, but when they migrate to a particular area they are more likely to use certain trails and water crossings; Caribou return to the same birthing grounds; Caribou follow the same general annual cycle each year; Caribou leaders, who are middle-aged cows with experience, have good memories; Caribou migrate to where the vegetation is lush and will remain in an area if the vegetation is easily accessible and plentiful; Caribou have a very strong sense of smell; Caribou are fairly adaptable to changing environments but adaptation has its limits, making them susceptible to pollutants; Caribou's survival and continued annual migration is dependent on the respect shown to them by humans; Only a few people have a spirit connection with the caribou, and therefore the knowledge and intelligence that comes from this. These people know where the caribou are at any given time, but cannot predict where the caribou will migrate to in the boreal forest. (Au)

I, J, T, P, N
Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal food; Animal migration; Caribou; Customs; Dogrib Indians; Elders; Environmental impacts; Hunting; Mining; Oral history; Oral history; Subsistence; Tailings; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality; Tundra ecology; Wildlife habitat

G0812, G0813
Contwoyto Lake region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Gras, Lac de, region, N.W.T.; Mesa Lake region, N.W.T.; North Slave Region, N.W.T.; Rae Lakes region, N.W.T.; Snare Lake region, N.W.T.


The trees all changed to wood (several Dogrib elders, 1996)   /   Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee   Zoe, S.A. [Researcher]   Rabesca, M.A. [Researcher]   Chocolate, M. [Translator]   Ryan, J. [Assistant Analyst]   Legat, A. [Principal Investigator]   Arctic Environmental Strategy [Sponsor]
[N.W.T. : Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee], 1997.
37 [i.e. 73] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
References.
ASTIS record 54582.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The purpose of the Rayrock Project is to demonstrate that the people who actively harvest renewable resources are the best individuals to monitor changes to the environment. The project made possible the documentation of Dogrib elders' knowledge of the environment prior to the establishment of the Rayrock uranium mine, and their knowledge of what indicated changes to the ecosystem. In addition this project has provided an opportunity for selected Dogrib elders to tell their 'story' of the Rayrock Mine. ... The DRRC wants to show that active harvesters of renewable resources should have been monitoring the environment during the life of Rayrock Mine. They want to make this point to ensure that in the future industrial sites will be monitored by Dogrib who harvest and know the ndè. The DRRC knows which elders travelled and lived near the Rayrock mine site prior to its opening. The elders' knowledge of wildlife, water, air, their own health and the ecosystem would have provided a general environmental baseline from which to measure environmental change. The elders say that before the mine opening they were unaware of anything that would disrupt the ndè or that would cause the people, animals and plant to have sores, or to become sick and die. ... The DRRC thought the same elders could provide the 'story', which would explain the changes observed around Rayrock. ... In order to demonstrate the above, the objectives for this research project are: to document how the ndè was before the mine opening, to document indicators of change to the ndè between May 1957 and July 1959, and to document the state of the ndè after closure of the mine. For the Dogrib elders, the ndè includes humans, therefore the elders interviewed discussed their knowledge of illnesses and deaths which they believe are related to the mine. Those currently ill include people who "shake". ... (Au)

P, R, J, T, N, K
Dogrib Indians; Effects monitoring; Elders; Environmental impacts; Health; Mining; Participatory action research; Radionuclides; Rayrock Mines Limited; Reclamation; Social surveys; Subsistence; Tailings; Traditional knowledge; Uranium

G0812
Gamètì region, N.W.T.; Martre, Lac la, region, N.W.T.; Rae region, N.W.T.; Snare Lake region, N.W.T.


We know and love Tliicho nde : comments and concerns from the Dechilaot'i elders: Alexis Arrowmaker, Madeline Judas, Pierre Judas, Margaret Lafferty, Jimmy Kodzin, Joseph Pea'a, Elizabeth Whane, Louis Whane, to the Environmental Assessment Review Panel, February 1996   /   Dene Cultural Institute (Hay River, N.W.T.)   Legat, A.   Zoe, S.A.   Blackduck, F. [Translator]   Football, C. [Translator]   Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee [Sponsor]   Dogrib Treaty 11 Council [Sponsor]
[S.l.] : Dene Cultural Institute, 1996.
25 leaves : maps ; 28 cm.
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 38400.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In June, 1995 several Dechilaot'i elders, all of whom worked in the Ek'ati area, used traditional knowledge and recent observations to express their concerns to BHP Diamonds Inc. (BHP) through the Environmental Impact Assessment process (Legat and Zoe 1995). These concerns were: i) how will Kweetii behave towards the environment and toward the Dogrib whose land they want to mine; and, ii) how will BHP protect the Ek'ati area as an important hunting, trapping and fishing area for future Dogrib. The elders throughout the Dogrib region continue to express these concerns. To date BHP has not acknowledged the land as belonging to the Dogrib nor has BHP provided a realistic plan to protect the nde, or for ensuring that future generations will live well on Tliicho nde. Rather than addressing their concerns, BHP has provided trips to the proposed mine site in the NWT and to mine sites in the United States, and have provided cash for various social issues and scholarships. In October 1995 the Dogrib Treaty 11 Council selected Romie Wetrade, an elder, and Sally Anne Zoe, a researcher, both of whom are part of the Gamiti research team, to travel to Wekweti to document places which have always been particularly important to the Dechilaot'i Dogrib. The elders of Wekweti, Alexis Arrowmaker, Madeline Judas, Pierre Judas, Margaret Lafferty, Jimmy Kodzin, Joseph Pea'a, Liza Tom, Elizabeth Whane and Louis Whane, emphasized the importance of knowing Dogrib history and places prior to discussing and making decisions about the nde. The Dechilaot'i elders stress the importance of understanding the nde as a whole. These elders do not talk about one location such as the Ek'ati area, without reference to the Dechilaot'i region, which according to Helm (1968:124) encompasses from the north arm of Great Slave Lake to Yellowknife River, northeast to Lac de Gras and the southern tip of Contwoyto Lake, along the west side of Contwoyto Lake to the northern tip of Contwoyto Lake and west to the region of the Et'atiti Dogrib. ... The body of this document consists of quotes. These quotes were selected as being representative of the collective statements made by the Dechilaot'i elders. This is because Dogrib elders are careful to only speak about what they know and select their works very carefully (Legat et al: 1994). (Au)

T, S, R, J, N, I, A, P
Animal distribution; Animal migration; BHP Diamond Mine Environmental Assessment Panel; Caribou; Customs; Denning; Diamonds; Dogrib Indians; Dogrib language; Ekati Mine; Elders; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Eskers; Fishes; Geographical names; Government relations; Inuit-Indian relations; Land use; Mining; Oral history; Social interaction; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Tailings; Traditional knowledge; Trails; Trapping; Uranium

G0812, G0813
Contwoyto Lake region, N.W.T./Nunavut; Gras, Lac de, region, N.W.T.; North Slave Region, N.W.T.


Traditional methods used by the Dogrib to redirect caribou   /   Dene Cultural Institute (Hay River, N.W.T.)   Zoe, S.A.   Football, C. [Translator]   Chocolate, M. [Translator]   Legat, A.   Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee [Sponsor]   Dogrib Treaty 11 Council [Sponsor]   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Renewable Resources
[Hay River, N.W.T. : Dene Cultural Institute], 1995.
ii, 14, [4] leaves : 4 maps ; 28 cm.
Appendix.
ASTIS record 36152.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In February 1995, the Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee proposed that preliminary research be conducted to document Dogrib traditional knowledge associated with redirecting caribou movements. The Department of Renewable Resources decided to provide funding for preliminary research which would take place over five weeks in February and March, 1995, and they agreed there is a growing recognition that there is a critical need for concrete information about traditional Dogrib knowledge on caribou behaviour and migration. The need for information arises from increased mining activity in the Dogrib region and the desire to keep caribou away from both active and inactive mines and the associated tailing ponds. There is much to suggest that Dogrib traditional knowledge will play an important role in developing a management plan during the next few decades when activity is being encouraged by the Territorial and Federal Governments. The objectives for the preliminary research are: to document methods used to redirect caribou movements; to document locations where specific methods were used; to document which methods were used at specific times of the years; to compile information into English for future educational purposes; and, to transcribe the information into Dogrib for future educational purposes. ... (Au)

T, I
Animal behaviour; Animal migration; Caribou; Dogrib Indians; Elders; Hunting; Noise; Oral history; Participatory action research; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Gamètì region, N.W.T.


Tliicho nde : the importance of knowing   /   Dene Cultural Institute (Hay River, N.W.T.)   Zoe, S.A.   Chocolate, M. [Translator]   Legat, A.   Dogrib Treaty 11 Council [Sponsor]   BHP Diamonds Inc. [Sponsor]
[S.l. : s.n.], 1995.
23, [15] leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
In: NWT Diamonds Project environmental impact statement : Volume I-Appendices / BHP Diamonds Inc. and DIA MET Minerals Ltd. - Vancouver, B.C. : BHP, 1995, appendix I-A, 23 p., maps
Appendices.
ASTIS record 36151.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... In May 1995, the Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel responded to ... [requests to include] a provision for traditional knowledge in the guidelines for the environmental review of the proposed BHP Diamonds Inc. (BHP) mine in the Ek'ati (Lac de Gras) area ... which is approximately 110 kilometers from the Dogrib community of Wekweti .... This report is the result of that research. By using both Dogrib traditional knowledge and observations, the elders documented their reasons for their main concerns which are: i) how will Whites behave towards the environment and towards the Dogrib whose land they want to mine; and ii) how will BHP protect the Ek'ati area as an important hunting, trapping and fishing area for future Dogrib. ... The objectives of the research are: i) to demonstrate the importance of elders guiding traditional knowledge research; ii) to demonstrate the importance of traditional knowledge as base line data for resource management; iii) to determine the possible length of time needed to complete the collection of traditional knowledge on the Lac de Gras area; iv) to demonstrate the importance of using the Dogrib language to ensure culturally appropriate interviews as well as culturally appropriate translation of concepts and terms; v) to demonstrate the importance of using trained Dogrib researchers to ensure each traditional concept is discussed and considered before writing the report. ... (Au)

T, I, S
Caribou; Dogrib Indians; Ekati Mine; Elders; Epistemology; Hunting; Land use; Oral history; Participatory action research; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Gamètì region, N.W.T.; Gras, Lac de, region, N.W.T.; Great Bear Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Slave Lake region, N.W.T.; Rae region, N.W.T.


Terms and concepts relating to renewable resources : an interim report   /   Dene Cultural Institute (Hay River, N.W.T.)   Legat, A.   Blackduck, R.   Zoe, S.A.   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Renewable Resources [Sponsor]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Conservation Education, Dept. of Renewable Resources, 1994.
21 leaves ; 28 cm.
Cover title: Dogrib terminology and concepts related to renewable resources : interim report = Tlicho Yate k'egoi?a, Asii Ch'aa?odo Giyati eyigots'o Ginaawo awets'edi.
References.
ASTIS record 36154.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... This draft document is intended to be used as a practical handbook by Renewable Resource officers, interpreters, biologists and others who wish to communicate information about renewable resources as effectively as possible to Dogrib-speaking audiences. We invite you to make this workbook your own. For this reason a number of blank pages are provided at the end of the text. The three main objectives of this project are: 1) To assist in information flow by providing Dogrib terms for previously untranslated English words, especially technical or scientific terms, or those that had unclear translations. Definitions are provided for those words that are not commonly used. 2) To introduce some basic traditional Dogrib concepts of wildlife and the environment. 3) To be a vehicle for ongoing verification and evolution of these new translations. It is important to point out that the development of new words must be done over a period of time, often years, and these translations may undergo several changes before a consensus is achieved. ... Terms and concepts have been documented in Dogrib and English, however concepts associated with differing belief systems will have to be discussed in more depth. It is probable that there are no translations for many terms and it would be better to use the term from either English or Dogrib. Very few Dogrib laws and rules regarding hunting, trapping, fishing and the treatment of animals and the land were documented, however the elders continue to discuss these issues and would like them documented. ... (Au)

T, H, I, J, N
Animals; Customary law; Dictionaries; Dogrib Indians; Dogrib language; Elders; English language; Oral history; Participatory action research; Plants (Biology); Pollution; Traditional knowledge; Wildlife management

G0812
Gamètì, N.W.T.


Participatory action research in Rae Lakes, NWT : the Traditional Government Project   /   Legat, A.
In: NWT Diamonds Project environmental impact statement : Volume I - Appendices / BHP Diamonds Inc. and DIA MET Minerals Ltd. - Vancouver, B.C. : BHP, 1995, appendix I - A, appendix two, 4 p., ill., 1 map
(Information north, v. 20, no. 2, June 1994, p. 1-4, ill., 1 map)
ASTIS record 34053.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Rae Lakes, Northwest Territories is a Dogrib community located on the river system between Great Slave and Great Bear lakes, approximately 200 air km from Yellowknife. The community was created in the 1960s when six families decided to leave Fort Rae, located on the highway to Yellowknife. These families wanted to avoid the non-native influences and to continue living according to the beliefs, values and laws of the Dogrib. Currently, the daily lives of the people in Rae Lakes reflect the "right way for the Dogrib" as well as the influences of the dominant society. ... The Traditional Government Project also reflects both ways. ... The PAR method is being used as it more easily accommodates community ownership and involvement, and ensures the local researchers become more knowledgeable about both Dogrib traditions and the approaches used by social scientists. Based on my experience, PAR is the most reliable method to use if a community wants to collect data that reflect the assumptions, perceptions and knowledge relevant to the community rather than those of the dominant society. Like other research methods, PAR has criteria that must be recognized and acted upon. ... (Au)

T, R
Customary law; Dogrib Indians; Government; Participatory action research; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Gamètì, N.W.T.


Dene Traditional Government Project, Rae Lakes, NT = Le projet de gouvernement traditionnel Déné aux lacs Rae, T.N.-O.   /   Legat, A. [Project Director]   Blackduck, R.   Zoe, S.
(Northline, v. 13, no. 3, Oct. 1993, p. 10)
Abstract only.
Presented at the Human Dimensions of Northern Research Conference, Arctic College, Fort Smith, N.W.T., 2 Oct. 1993.
ASTIS record 33196.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

In 1991, the community of Rae Lakes requested assistance from Dene Cultural Institute to do a research project which would help Band Council to learn about the traditional ways of governing themselves. They wanted to return to selection of leadership by consensus and to develop a self-government model which would truly reflect the "right ways" of governing the Dogrib people. This project has trained two Dogrib researchers who are now interviewing elders about 1) traditional leadership; 2) traditional decision making; 3) traditional ways of making laws; 4) traditional ways of making peace; 5) traditional ways of passing down laws; and, 6) the traditional beliefs on which the Dogrib political system is built. (Au)

T, R
Customs; Dogrib Indians; Elders; Government; Occupational training; Participatory action research; Self-determination; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Gamètì, N.W.T.


Participatory Action Research Workshop = Atelier de recherche-action participative   /   Rabesca, M.A.   Romie, D.   Blackduck, R.   Zoe, S.   Legat, A.   Johnson, M.   Ryan, J.
(Northline, v. 13, no. 3, Oct. 1993, p. 9)
Abstract only.
Presented at the Human Dimensions of Northern Research Conference, Arctic College, Fort Smith, N.W.T., 2 Oct. 1993.
ASTIS record 33193.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

The emphasis of the workshop will be on the importance of evolving research methods which include local people, their training, and the ultimate goal of PAR is to leave sufficient expertize in the community to carry out any further research wanted. PAR principles include the need for the community to have and retain control over the project from its start, the establishment of a local advisory committee to oversee the project, sharing of power and making decisions by consensus, constant feedback on progress and results to the larger community, the verification of findings at a regional level and consensus on any recommendations. Our research projects have been joint ventures between the local Band Council, who initiates the research, Arctic Institute and Dene Cultural Institute who facilitate setting up the projects, finding funding and PIs and PDs. The workshop will allow for some small group discussions and simulated decision-making. Come and explore some new ideas and meet our very accomplished Dogrib researchers. (Au)

T
Dogrib Indians; Participatory action research; Public participation; Research; Traditional knowledge

G0812
N.W.T.


Report of the Traditional Knowledge Working Group   /   Legat, A. [Editor]   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Culture & Communications [Sponsor]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : N.W.T. Dept. of Culture and Communication, 1991.
116 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN 0-7708-3872-3
References.
Text in English, Dogrib, Chipewyan, South Slavey, North Slavey, Gwich'in, Inuktitut, French, and Inuvialuitum.
ASTIS record 32801.
Languages: Many Languages
Libraries: ACU

... At the 30th annual meeting of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) in Yellowknife in 1988 the Leader of the Government of the Northwest Territories, Dennis Patterson, acknowledged that there is a "wide spectrum of areas where traditional knowledge may have an influence on government policy and programs." He established the Working Group on Traditional Knowledge in October, 1989 to define traditional knowledge, examine its current and potential use, and identify obstacles and solutions which will increase its influence in northern society. ... (Au)

T, R
Environmental policy; Government; Government relations; Native peoples; Traditional knowledge

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


Northwest Territories Archives accession no. N89-008   /   Legat, A. [Interviewer]   Northern Heritage Society [Sponsor]   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Culture & Communications [Sponsor]
1987-1988.
15 sound cassettes + 0.5 cm of textual material.
Restricted to non-commercial use only.
Tapes 1-12 are in Inuvialuktun. Tape 13 contains a story in a language which the translator could not understand. An English copy of a transcript summary is available in the accession file. There is also a copy of a brief summary of each tape made by Randy Freeman as the interviews were being conducted.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 33640.
Languages: Inuvialuktun

William Kuptana was born at Kangiqyuaq (Prince Albert Sound) in the early 1890s. Although his name is Kuptan, he was given the name, William Kuptana, by Anglican missionaries when they baptised him on 7th October, 1917 at Victoria Island. In 1986 Professor Hansjurgen Muller-Beck of Tubingen University requested that the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre conduct a series of interviews with William Kuptana of Sachs Harbour as he realised that Kuptana could contribute significantly to scientific knowledge on the traditional lifestyle of Copper Inuit. As the Northern Heritage Centre did not have a trained oral history interviewer on staff, the Director approached the Northern Heritage Society, a non-profit organisation based in Yellowknife, with a plan for a joint project to conduct these interviews. The Department of Culture and Communications partially funded the project and the interviews were conducted by Allice Legat, the Director of the Northern Heritage Society and Randolph Freeman, the Territorial Toponymist at the Northern Heritage Centre, Department of Culture and Communications. In May 1988 the original cassette recordings and transcripts were forwarded to the NWT Archives by Allice Legat. This accession consists of 13 cassettes of oral history recordings made with William Kuptana of Banks Island. The first 9 tapes were recorded between April 28 and May 4, 1987; and the remaining four in January, 1988. Transcript summaries were produced by Peter Esau, a guide from Sachs Harbour who was the project's translator. Allice Legat was the interviewer and Randy Freeman the recorder. The contents of the original cassettes were transferred onto DAT tapes in July, 1993 and the DAT tapes will be retained as the archival masters. The recordings contain detailed information about Kuptana's life and the traditional life style of the Copper Inuit who frequented Banks Island. He discusses spiritual beliefs, and customs associated with hunting, dancing, and medicine men. He describes various aspects of the material culture of the Copper Inuit describing how many items were produced. He also relates stories, legends and myths of the Copper Inuit. Kuptana also discusses the whaling industry which was centred around Herschel Island. (Au)

T, V
Archival material; Copper Eskimos; Customs; Dancing; Health care; Inuit languages; Legends; Oral history; Sound recordings; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality; Whaling

G0813, G0811, G0812
Banks Island, N.W.T.; Herschel Island, Yukon; Victoria Island, N.W.T./Nunavut


Finding our past in the present   /   Legat, A.   Hanks, C.
(Information north, v. 13, no. 2, Feb. 1987, p. 2, 4, ill.)
ASTIS record 21210.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Two unique projects now provide young northerners with opportunities to learn about science in a refreshing manner that many find more relevant to their backgrounds than stuffy classrooms. The Northern Heritage Research Project (NHRP) and the Drum Lake Archaeological Field School are designed to spark interest in learning while training students for employment as technical assistants and to prepare them for leadership roles in their home communities. NHRP is under the direction of the Northern Heritage Society and Drum Lake is run by the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. (Au)

U, T
Archaeology; Dene Indians; Drum Lake Archaeological Field School; Ethnology; Northern Heritage Research Project; Occupational training; Research

G0812, G0813
Norman Wells region, N.W.T.; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


A bibliography on labour, employment and training in the Canadian North : some important issues = Bibliographie sur la main d'oeuvre, l'emploi et la formation dans le Nord canadien : aspects majeurs de la question   /   de la Barre, K.   Harvey, D.   Committee on Northern Population Research   Legat, A.   Arctic Institute of North America. Native and Social Issues Program   Goodwin, R.   Sirko, A.   Howard, L.   Arctic Science and Technology Information System
[Calgary, Arctic Institute of North America], 1983.
xv, 106 p. ; 28 cm.
(ASTIS occasional publication, no. 8)
ISBN 2-920393-02-2
Prepared under the auspices of Committee on Northern Population Research.
Cover title: A bibliography on labour, employment and training in the Canadian North = Bibliographie sur la main d'oeuvre, l'emploi et la formation dans le Nord canadien.
ASTIS record 11654.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU NFSMO XQKNRC

... The present bibliography focuses on population related material concerned primarily with labour, employment and training issues in the Canadian North. A limited amount of material has been included from Alaska, and a few other areas .... This bibliography reflects the extensive literature that describes the economic impacts of large energy and mineral extraction projects, particularly as they affect the training and employment of northerners. ... Of particular interest is the wide range of literature dealing with co-operatives as a form of commercial and social organization which has proven to be a useful mechanism for training and employing native northerners. In addition a substantial number of reports have been included that are concerned with specialized training programs, and different terms and conditions of employment which have been developed by industry, specifically for northern Canada. (Au)

R, T, Q, P
Bibliographies; Economic conditions; Employees; Employment; Employment forecasting; Labour supply; Native peoples; Occupational training; Petroleum industry; Population; Vocational education

G081, G06, G082
Alaska; Canadian Arctic; Middle North


Political anthropological analysis of a northern Canadian community   /   Legat, A.   Hatt, D.G. [Supervisor]
Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary, 1982.
viii, 119 leaves ; 30 cm.
(Canadian theses on microfiche, no. 57162)
Thesis (M.A.) - University of Calgary, Dept. of Anthropology, Calgary, Alta., 1982.
Bibliography: p. 111-119.
ASTIS record 13835.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

F.G. Bailey's theoretical framework of political competition and leadership is used to examine a northern Canadian community. This community has remained unincorporated, owing to a strong local emphasis on independence. Formal government is rejected, yet the ideas of community and of communication with the provincial government are deemed important, thus leading to a variety of informal leadership positions. Members of the business community are the most organized and participate on a regular basis in the Board of Trade, which has become the principal forum for political action. During controversies concerning the future of the community, other residents participate for short periods. Long-term organized commitments are viewed as a rejection of the lifestyle and values they wish to protect. Leaders are not formally selected, rather they are persons willing to speak for the community. Gossip and criticism, which are associated with the normative ideals pertaining to the community as well as the individual, are among the main strategies used in political competition. (Au)

T, R
Anthropology; Community development; Government; Political action; Public participation; Social conditions; Theses; Villages

G0811
Atlin Lake region, British Columbia/Yukon


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