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The ASTIS database cites the following 54 publication(s) by Peter Johnson. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Setting priorities for research in the North of Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Different lives, common threads : Proceedings of Circumpolar Women's Conference, Whitehorse, Yukon, 18-20 November 1999 & The North Colloquium, Edmonton, Alberta, May 2000. Northern review (Whitehorse), no. 22, Winter 2000, p. 156-165)
References.
ASTIS record 48798.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... From my perspective, the major challenges to the formulation and coordination of research priorities in the North of Canada are: i) the number of agencies setting research agendas; ii) poor communication and consultation between some agencies with respect to research agendas; iii) low level of political commitment, at the federal level, to research supporting international protocols and agreements; iv) absence of federal political will to promote Canadian leadership in northern research; v) inadequate funds over two decades for national northern research and training (although this may be changing if the recommendations of the report of the NSERC/SSHRC Task Force on Northern Research are funded), and vi) no university in the Arctic addressing the needs of the northern communities. It must be emphasised, however, that the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade strongly supports the circumpolar University of the Arctic (DFAIT June 2000). The northern colleges are making progress in addressing post-secondary education needs in the North, have signed Memoranda of Understanding with universities for joint programs, are involved in the University of the Arctic, and are moving towards degree-granting status. ... Briefly, in conclusion, a vision is needed for northern research and training in Canada. A vision that meshes two or more cultural traditions. This vision requires mechanisms for setting priorities with the collaboration of northern communities and governments, the federal government, and universities and colleges. It requires infrastructure with laboratories and state-of-the-art communications at affordable costs. It requires appropriate education programs at all levels in the North and in the universities. It requires strengthening protocols and ethics for northern research. Above all it requires development of trust between the principals in the research process. (Au)

R, L
Climate change; Communication; Education; Education policy; Environmental impacts; Foreign relations; Funding for education; Government; Licences; Polar Continental Shelf Project (Canada); Research; Research funding; Research organizations

G08, G13, G081
Canada; Canadian Arctic; Finland; Japan; Norway; Svalbard; United States


Hydrometeorology, suspended sediment and conductivity in a large glacierized basin, Slims River, Yukon Territory, Canada (1993-94)   /   Sawada, M.   Johnson, P.G.
(Arctic, v. 53, no. 2, June 2000, p. 101-117, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 46714.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic53-2-101.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic841
Libraries: ACU

The Slims River was monitored for global solar radiation, air temperature, discharge, suspended sediment, and dissolved load in 1993 and 1994. Peak seasonal discharge occurred late in the summer and reflects a typical glacierized basin hydrograph, with increased bare ice surfaces contributing strongly to discharge in July and August. Air temperature, rather than global solar radiation, was most strongly correlated with discharge in both years, but during sustained ablation, air temperature becomes a poor index of meltwater production. Precipitation was infrequent and of low magnitude. The variance in suspended sediment concentration could be explained only in part by discharge; frequent clockwise hysteresis and seasonal sediment concentration peaks unrelated to discharge variations also contributed to this variance. High concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in meltwaters reflect the lithological influence of carboniferous sedimentary rocks in the basin. Conductivity and individual cation concentrations decreased during both seasons and were inversely related to discharge. Diurnal conductivity amplitude was greatest during glacier melt, and frequent clockwise hysteresis was observed in both years. (Au)

E, F, N
Ablation; Atmospheric temperature; Climate change; Electrical properties; Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Hydroelectric power; Hydrology; River discharges; Rivers; Runoff; Sediment transport; Solar radiation; Suspended solids

G0811
Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Slims River, Yukon


The University of the Arctic   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Arctic, v. 52, no. 3, Sept. 1999, p. iii-iv)
ASTIS record 45310.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic52-3-iii.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic928
Libraries: ACU

... The advent of the Arctic Council renewed interest in northern post-secondary education and particularly in university education on the international scene. In early 1997, following informal discussions, the Arctic Council asked the Circumpolar Universities Association (CUA) to appoint a task force to report on the concept of a circumpolar university. The Arctic Council accepted the report in late 1997 and charged the CUA with forming a working group to develop a feasibility study. The working group consisted of representatives of the eight circumpolar countries and the indigenous peoples of the Arctic. The feasibility study was subsequently approved by the Ministerial Meeting of the Arctic Council in Iqaluit in 1998, and the working group became the Interim Council for the University of the Arctic, independent of the CUA. Canada is represented on the Interim Council by the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (I am the current President) and by Sally Ross, President of Yukon College, who represents the three northern colleges. The indigenous peoples' participants' the Sami Council, the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, and the Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North - endorsed the concept of the University, provided that the full participation of indigenous people was ensured. ... The concept of the University is one of a university without walls. Programs are intended to be delivered through a range of distance learning technologies, through formal classroom settings at a number of locations in the circumpolar world and elsewhere (depending on the nature of the program component), and at field locations around the Arctic. In many locations, technical capacity will have to be upgraded to allow distance learning to be available not only in community centres, but in individual homes. This capacity is essential to maintain the strength of the community in northern cultures. However, mobility will also be promoted for some components of the programs, to bring together Arctic students and Southern students. ... One of the major challenges will be to develop information sources to support the curriculum. Since the focus of most extant texts is mid or low latitudes, it will be necessary to promote materials that emphasize the Arctic reality, which can readily be translated and produced in both hard copy and electronic formats. The University is therefore moving ahead with its mandate to provide undergraduate and postgraduate training with a focus on Northern issues and delivered in the North. The University is seeking full participation of northern people for its governance and instructional staff, while continuing to promote the integration of expertise in existing institutions. (Au)

R, T
Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies; Association of Circumpolar Universities; Curricula; Distance education; Economic conditions; Native peoples; Public participation; Relocation; Rural conditions; Social conditions; Traditional knowledge; University of the Arctic

G02, G081
Arctic regions; Canadian Arctic


1999 directory of northern studies courses   /   Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies   Mullin, S.A. [Compiler]   Johnston, M. [Compiler]   Johnson, P.G. [Compiler]   Canadian Polar Commission [Sponsor]
Ottawa : ACUNS, 1999.
xvi, 127 p. ; 23 x 28 cm.
ASTIS record 44591.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

To produce a compilation of courses and programs with a northern content had been one of the Association's projects for a while. When the Association became involved in the University of the Arctic Feasibility Study in late 1997, it became apparent that such a directory would be a very useful tool. With the generous support of the Canadian Polar Commission, a team at Lakehead University began collecting information from colleges and universities across Canada. This document is meant to be a starting point. Institutions which offer courses, field classes or programs which concern the Canadian North or the Polar regions of the world, which are not listed in this directory, are invited to contact ... [ACUNS]. There are a limited number of hard copies available from the office. The document will be posted on the ACUNS new Web site and will be ungraded periodically. (Au)

R
Colleges; Curricula; Directories; Universities; World Wide Web

G081, G08
Canada; Canadian Arctic


Morphology and surface structures of Maxwell Creek rock glaciers, St Elias Mountains, Yukon : rheological implications   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Permafrost and periglacial processes, v. 9, no. 1, Jan.-Mar. 1998, p. 57-70, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 47551.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-1530(199801/03)9:1<57::AID-PPP275>3.3.CO;2-7
Libraries: ACU

The dominant role of mass movement processes in the formation of south-west Yukon paraglacial landscapes is exemplified by a tributary of Maxwell Creek. Rock glaciers occur along most of the length of the mid-valley. Two large rock glaciers flowing from cirques on the east and west sides of the valley are confluent in the centre of the valley, and have a combined lobe extending 1 km downvalley. Morphological contrasts between the moraines and flow lobes of the east form, and the flow ridges of the west form, indicate different processes of movement at the surface. Sections in the surface deposits indicate movement of the mass of material in the lobes but demonstrate a combination of overriding and compression flow in the ridges. Near surface composition varies from large boulders with voids, to boulders with gravel and fines matrix and with the ice content varying from interstitial to massive infilling of the voids. Palaeosols sampled 1 m underneath overriding ridges were dated at 1480 and 660 a BP. The rock glaciers produced a combined central valley landform at the end of the Wisconsin. Neoglacial activity resulted only in confluence of the rock glaciers, without extension downvalley. The combination of the compressional and overriding ridges with the variability of the sediments and ice content is indicative of a complex surface rheology. Comparison with the ridges and lobes of rock glaciers in other valleys suggests that this surface variability is common on the rock glaciers of the southwest Yukon. (Au)

B, E, A
Geomorphology; Glacial landforms; Ground ice; Mass wasting; Moraines; Palaeopedology; Rock glaciers; Sediments (Geology)

G0811
Maxwell Creek region, Yukon; Maxwell Creek, Yukon


Discharge, suspended sediment concentration, and conductivity of the Slims River, Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Sawada, M.   Johnson, P.G.
Abstract only.
Canadian Association of Geographers, annual meeting, June 1998, Program and abstracts, p. 211-212.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 45525.
Languages: English

Summer discharge of the Slims River in both 1993 and 1994 was strongly positively correlated with air temperature. Precipitation events, which were infrequent and of low magnitude, had little effect on the hydrograph. Peak seasonal discharge occurs due to glacier ice-melt in the basin after the early season snowmelt from the lower basin. Total discharge in 1993 was greater than that of 1994 but was still considerably lower than reported peak flows. Diurnal clockwise hysteresis defines the short term relation between suspended sediment concentration and discharge causing poor explanation of variance of suspended sediment concentration by discharge. The dominant cations are Ca²+, Mg²+, K+ and Na+, each of which has a strong positive relation with conductivity. The high absolute values of Ca²+ and Mg²+ reflect the occurrence of dolomite in the basin. Conductivity, and thus individual cation concentrations, decrease through both seasons and are inversely related to discharge. Diurnal conductivity amplitude was greatest during the glacier melt period and clockwise hysteresis defines the short-term relation between discharge and conductivity leading to a poor explanation of variance of conductivity by discharge. (Au)

F, E
Atmospheric temperature; Electrical properties; Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Melting; River discharges; Sediment transport; Snowmelt; Suspended solids

G0811
Slims River, Yukon


Paleoenvironment reconstruction in the southwest Yukon : potential for fine resolution studies over the last 1000 years   /   Johnson, P.G.   Gajewski, K.   Lacourse, T.
Presented at the Wolf Creek Research Basin Workshop, Whitehorse, Yukon, March 1998.
Abstract only.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 45522.
Languages: English

Sediments from different lake environments in the Kluane Region are being analysed for a multi-parameter approach to palaeoenvironment reconstruction. 4-5m cores dating from deglaciation of the region provide the opportunity for high resolution studies and offer the possibility of studies of climate variability by comparison with lacustrine records in the Whitehorse area. Initial results from pollen analysis demonstrate conformation with other studies in the region. Geochemical and stratigraphic analysis together with initial analysis of molluscs indicate variability of lacustrine conditions throughout the Holocene. (Au)

B, F, H, I, J, E
Bottom sediments; Climate change; Deglaciation; Geochemistry; Lakes; Mollusks; Palaeoecology; Palaeontology; Palynology; Recent epoch; Stratigraphy

G0811
Kluane Lake region, Yukon; Whitehorse region, Yukon


Paleoenvironmental reconstruction in the southwest Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.   Gajewski, K.   Lacourse, T.
Abstract only.
Presented at the Arctic Forum, Arctic Research Consortium of the United States, annual meeting, 1998.
References.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 45521.
Languages: English

In the Kluane Region of the southwest Yukon there are lakes with sedimentary records which range from organic accumulations to carbonate deposition to clastic deposition. These occur in open system basins with well-developed surface inflow and outflow, in closed basins with groundwater control, and in lakes supplied from glacierized regions. Deglaciation of the area occurred, according to currently accepted ideas, about 12,500 yrs BP (Denton and Stuiver 1966). Bulk carbonates dates, which are problematic, suggest that the retreat of the ice may have been earlier. The sediment stratigraphic and pollen records indicate that there has been uninterrupted sedimentation through the Holocene. Within the stratigraphy the White River Volcanic Ash dated at 1147 BP (Clague et. al. 1995) provides an excellent recent marker horizon but no other stratigraphic correlations have been established between lakes. The paleoenvironmental data in the sediments is providing a detailed proxy record of change through the Holocene. The palynologcial record from Sulphur Lake conforms with the trends indicated from other studies in the region with an early grassland tundra being replaced with a Betula and Pinus community before the invasion of Picea about 8,500 yrs BP. Additional data from chironomids, ostracods, macrofossils and charcoal is contained in the sediments. In the carbonate Jenny, Emerald and Keyhole Lakes two species of Pea Clams are present through the record and the high degree of preservation will permit a detailed reconstruction of the lacustrine conditions. The population of the pea clams varies markedly through the sediment which is thought to indicate temperature fluctuations of the lake. The sediments also contain a detailed record of input of eolian sediment. The presence of small quantities of magnetite from the loess gives a definite magnetic susceptibility signal on the background of the carbonate sediments. The carbonates have a signal which is zero to slightly negative and experiments have shown that even a 5% by weight loess composition produces a recognisable magnetic susceptibility peak. Variations between cores probably represent variability during depositional events but there is evidence for loess contribution throughout the Holocene. Glacier fed lakes contain a proxy hydrological record in the clastic sediments which indicate considerable variability through time (Johnson 1997). (Au)

B, H, I, F, J
Bottom sediments; Charcoal; Clams; Cores; Deglaciation; Glacial melt waters; Lakes; Loess; Magnetic properties; Palaeoecology; Palaeohydrology; Palaeontology; Palynology; Plant succession; Recent epoch; Sedimentation; Stratigraphy

G0811
Emerald Lake, Yukon; Jenny Lake region, Yukon; Jenny Lake, Yukon; Sulphur Lake region, Yukon; Sulphur Lake, Yukon


The Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Learning to be circumpolar : experiences in Arctic academic cooperation / Edited by Richard Langlais and Outi Snellman. Publications in the University of the Arctic process, no. 5, 1998, p. 57-61)
ASTIS record 43650.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (ACUNS), founded in 1978, currently has a membership of twenty-nine universities and the three northern colleges (Yukon College, Aurora College and Nunavut Arctic College). ... In the 1980s the Association, headed by a President and an Executive Director, promoted a series of workshops and conferences, and was active in lobbying on behalf of northern science. In the last five years ACUNS has seen a reduction in its core funding from the Government of Canada during the Program Review process and subsequent budget restraints. ... The major immediate concerns of the Association are the viability of northern science in Canada, and the training of the next generation of northern scientists. Both of these have been seriously affected by a number of fiscal and policy trends over the last few years. A second major objective is to obtain a renewed commitment to northern science for the next century. ... Two years ago discussions started within the Federal Government on a Northern Science and Technology Strategy. A document on "A Federal Northern Science and Technology Strategy" was circulated within government and, based on comments received, a workshop on the "Coordination of Federal Northern Science and Technology" was held in February 1998. ACUNS submitted a position paper ... for this meeting. In this paper ACUNS pointed out Canada's weak position in comparison with the Arctic research effort of a number of other circumpolar countries, and argued for a national policy. ... The paper also presented an argument on the critical state of university based northern science, northern science training, and science logistics. It drew strong comparisons with the fact that the Aurora Research Institute in Inuvik and the Nunavut Research Institute in Iqaluit had developed in depth research agendas. It also pointed out the commitments being made by other nations to research in the Arctic. ... We perceive that one of the ways in which northern science can be promoted in Canada is through partnerships between the granting councils and other agencies and institutions. One mechanism which might be particularly attractive is partnerships between SSHRC and First Nations communities. The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, although not specifically dealing with research, implies a vast domain in which research needs may be identified by Indigenous peoples. ... Similarly partnerships between NSERC and SSHRC on integrated research programs, which are becoming more important in northern research, might be promoted. ... (Au)

R, T
Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies; Education policy; Ethics; Higher education; Licences; Native organizations; Native peoples; Research; Research funding; Research organizations; Science; Self-determination; Universities

G08
Canada


Electrical resistivity measurements on the rock glaciers of Grizzly Creek, St. Elias Mountains, Yukon   /   Evin, M.   Fabre, D.   Johnson, P.G.
(Permafrost and periglacial processes, v. 8, no. 2, Apr.-June 1997, p. 179-189, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 53264.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-1530(199732)8:2<179::AID-PPP247>3.0.CO;2-C
Libraries: ACU NFSMO

Some 20 electrical resistivity soundings were performed on rock glaciers in Grizzly Creek, southwest Yukon, to investigate the geometry of the permafrost and the amount of ice in the sediments. The technique, which has been used successfully on many rock glaciers in the Alps, indicated here that there was no extensive massive ice in the sounded rock glaciers and especially in a landform previously identified as a glacier ice-cored rock glacier. The nature of the transition between glacier ice-cored moraines and glacier ice exposed at the head of the landform is discussed. (Au)

A, F, C, B
Deglaciation; Earth resistance; Erosion; Geophysical exploration; Glacial deposits; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Ground ice; Moraines; Periglacial landforms; Permafrost; Rock glaciers; Size; Spatial distribution; Thickness

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon


Les fluctuations du niveau des eaux du lac Kluane au sud-ouest du Yukon [Water level fluctuations of Kluane Lake, southwest Yukon]   /   LeBlanc, P.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Program and abstracts : 27th Arctic Workshop, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa, February 27-March 2, 1997 / Edited by Antoni G. Lewkowicz and Steven V. Kokelj. - [S.l. : s.n.], 1997, p. 152
Abstract only.
Reference.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 45530.
Languages: French

L'existence de plages soulevées situées au dessus du niveau actuel des eaux du lac Kluane ainsi que celle de forêts inondées témoigne des fluctuations du niveau du lac au cours de l'Holocène. Une datation radiocarbone effectuée sur une souche d'arbre inondée nous a donné un âge de 420±60 ans ce qui indique donc d'une élévation récente du niveau du lac. Les lacs Fox Point et Rat étant situés immédiatement en bordure du lac Kluane, le niveau de leurs eaux se trouve contrôlé par le niveau hydrostatique de la nappe phréatique qui est lui-même contrôlé par celui du lac Kluane. L'analyse des séquences sédimentaires de ces deux lacs devrait donc nous permettre de reconstruire l'histoire hydrologique du lac Kluane. Ces deux lacs, avec des profondeurs d'environ 9 à 10 mètres dans les sections les plus profondes, auraient été asséchés durant les épisodes de bas niveaux (i.e. inférieurs à 10 mètres sous le niveau actuel) et, à l'inverse, auraient été inondés pendant les phases de hauts niveaux associés aux plages soulevées. Les altitudes des points les moins élevés séparant ces lacs du lac Kluane étant connus, les phases inondées pourront également être situées dans la chronologie des fluctuations du niveau du lac Kluane. L'analyse des séquences sédimentaires de ces lacs semblent des variations importantes dans la nature et la composition du sédiment. Des mesures de susceptibilité magnétique, des radiographies et une description détaillée des carottes nous ont permis de vérifier la continuité des séquences stratigraphiques et de faire les premières observations. Les analyses granulométriques, la détermination du pourcentage de matière organique et de carbonate, l'identification des minéraux et des macro-restes ainsi que les analyses isotopiques serviront à reconstruire les conditions paléo-environnementales de ces deux bassins. Grâce à l'information qui sera ainsi obtenue, l'hypothèse de Bostock (1969) sur les fluctuations de niveaux et le renversement du sens d'écoulement du lac Kluane pourra être vérifiée . De plus, d'autres théories pourront élaborées sur l'histoire des conditions environnementales et hydrologiques néoglaciaires de cette région. (Au)

B, F, J, A
Glacial epoch; Lakes; Palaeoecology; Palaeohydrology; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology); Shorelines; Water level

G0811
Kluane Lake, Yukon


Hysteresis in the relation between suspended sediment concentration and discharge, Slims River, Yukon Territory, Canada, 1994   /   Sawada, M.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Program and abstracts : 27th Arctic Workshop, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa, February 27-March 2, 1997 / Edited by Antoni G. Lewkowicz and Steven V. Kokelj. - [S.l. : s.n.], 1997, p. 200-202, ill.
Abstract only.
References.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 45527.
Languages: English

Hysteresis between suspended sediment concentration and discharge is common in many glacial and proglacial streams during diurnal discharge and in non-glacial streams during stormflow. There have been a number of explanations that address this phenomena, however, none of these explanations sufficiently explains the frequency of hysteresis observed in the Slims River at its input to Kluane Lake. Clockwise hysteresis, the most common type, occurs when suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) are higher on the rising limb of the hydrograph for equal discharges on the falling limb. A qualitative model of the causes underlying hysteresis has been derived. ... (Au)

F
Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Mathematical models; Melting; River discharges; Suspended solids

G0811
Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Slims River, Yukon


Spatial and temporal variability of ice-dammed lake sediments in alpine environments   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Ice-contact sedimentation : processes and deposits / Edited by W.P. Warren and G.M. Ashley. Quaternary science reviews, v. 16, no. 7, 1997, p. 635-647, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 45099.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1016/S0277-3791(97)00012-7
Libraries: ACU

The stratigraphic record of ice-dammed lakes is the product of a combination of daily, intraseasonal, seasonal and interseasonal fluctuations in sediment input combined with periods of drawdown or drainage of the lake. Sedimentation may take place on an ice-cored bed which produces deformation structures on melting and eventually results in limited preservation during and after deglaciation. The sediments of the contemporary and older ice-dammed lakes in the Kaskawulsh and Dusty Glacier basins of the southwest Yukon reflect a number of hydrological regimes and lake histories, and also demonstrate the complexity of the sedimentary environment. The Kaskawulsh Glacier lake evolved from being semi-permanent at the start of deglaciation from the Little Ice Age maximum to annually draining at present. The Dusty Glacier Lake was impounded by glacier surges and had a duration of only a few years after each surge. A model of the effects of variations in sediment source, contrasting hydrological regimes and geomorphological events on sediment accumulation illustrates how spatial and temporal variability is the predominant characteristic of the sediments. (Au)

B, A, F
Bottom sediments; Deglaciation; Diurnal variations; Geomorphology; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Palaeohydrology; Seasonal variations; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology); Spatial distribution; Temporal variations

G0811
Dusty Glacier, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon; Steele Glacier, Yukon


Paleoenvironmental studies in the Kluane Lake region, southwestern Yukon   /   Lacourse, T.   Gajewski, K.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Program and abstracts : 27th Arctic Workshop, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa, February 27-March 2, 1997 / Edited by Antoni G. Lewkowicz and Steven V. Kokelj. - [S.l. : s.n.], 1997, p. 140
Abstract only.
References.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 43204.
Languages: English

The Kluane Lake region of the southwestern Yukon provides many opportunities for paleonenvironmental research. Evidence of Holocene climate changes are available from records of glacial fluctuation .... Paleoclimatic studies based on the analysis of microfossils in lake sediments offer the potential for high resolution and well-dated independent records of past climates. The vegetation of the area is an open white spruce (Picea glauca) boreal forest with Artemisia-dominated grasslands on drier slopes. Extensive stands of poplar (Populus) are also present. Black spruce (P. mariana) is uncommon, occurring on some wet sites. Alder (Alnus) is sparsely distributed in the Kluane Lake region but nevertheless alder contributes significantly to the pollen rain. These sites present potential analogues for some late-glacial pollen assemblages. For calibration studies, a transect of lakes from just to the north of Kluane Lake to the Yukon/British Columbia provincial border were sampled for surface sediments and water chemistry. These sites include a wide variety of environments, and many influences affect water quality and vegetation distribution. The input of loess from the Slims and Donjek Rivers affect some of these sites. The sites are all basic, while surface conductivity varies from 115 to 610 µS/cm. A volcanic ash dated at 1147 BP ... covered the region to varying degrees, and serves as a stratigraphic marker, the presence of which aids in dating and correlating lake sediment cores from the region. A core recovered from Sulphur Lake (60.95 N; 137.95 W, 847 m) contains a 4.62 m sequence of relatively organic sediment which can potentially provide a high resolution pollen sequence. (Au)

B, E, H, F, C
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Climate change; Lakes; Loess; Palaeobotany; Palaeoclimatology; Palynology; Plant distribution; Poplars; Pyroclastics; Recent epoch; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology); Suspended solids; Taiga ecology; Water quality; White spruces

G0811
Donjek River, Yukon; Kluane Lake region, Yukon; Slims River, Yukon; Sulphur Lake, Yukon


Seasonal and short-term periodic suspended sediment concentration and bulk hydrochemical variations, Slims River 1993 and 1994, Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Sawada, M.C.   Johnson, P.G. [Supervisor]
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, 1996.
187 p.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. MQ20950)
Thesis (M.A.) - University of Ottawa, Dept. of Geography, Ottawa, Ont., 1996.
References.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 45320.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Peak seasonal discharge takes place after snowmelt in 1994 as meltwater production was amplified by more exposed glacier ice which was indicated by exponentially increasing diurnal discharge amplitude. Air temperature strongly influenced discharge in both years and precipitation was infrequent with limited influence. Discharges in 1994 were under-competent. Diurnal clockwise hysteresis defines the short term relation between suspended sediment concentration and discharge but current explanations fail to explain its frequency. Respectively, the dominant cations are Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+, and each has a strong positive relation with conductivity. Conductivity, and thus individual cation concentrations, decrease over both seasons and are inversely related to discharge. Diurnal conductivity amplitude was greatest with glacier melt and clockwise hysteresis defines the short-term relation between discharge and conductivity. (Au)

F, E, B
Atmospheric temperature; Chemical properties; Diurnal variations; Electrical properties; Geomorphology; Glacial melt waters; Precipitation (Meteorology); Runoff; Seasonal variations; Sediments (Geology); Snowmelt; Suspended solids; Theses

G0811
Slims River region, Yukon


Ice-dammed lake history, Dusty Glacier, St. Elias Mountains, Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Canadian geographer, v. 39, no. 3, Fall 1995, p. 262-273, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 73707.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1541-0064.1995.tb00417.x
Libraries: ACU

Glacier margin ice-dammed lakes have been a common feature of the glacial landscape of the St. Elias Mountains of the southwest Yukon. The sedimentary successions in the lake basins contain a record of glacier hydrology variability and ice-dammed lake fluctuations. The interpretation of the sedimentology depends on an understanding of glacierized basin hydrology and particularly the suspended sediment dynamics of glacier discharge streams. A basin on the north margin of the Dusty Glacier contained a lake at least three times during deglaciation from the maximum of the Little Ice Age. The sedimentary record is composed of fluvioglacial sand and gravel facies from periods of drainage of the lake and a number of lacustrine facies that contain evidence of water level fluctuations. The lacustrine facies consist of laminated silt, laminated silt and sand, and stratified silt and sand, which are indicative of variable sediment input on daily, intra-seasonal, and seasonal time scales, but which are dominated by short time scale rythmites. The lake formed during surges of the Dusty Glacier and drained as the ice activity declined. Progressive downwasting of the Dustry Glacier at present indicates little potential for the lake to refill. (Au)

B, F, A
Deglaciation; Diurnal variations; Drainage; Geomorphology; Glacial deposits; Glacial epoch; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glacier ice; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Glacier variations; Hydrology; Moraines; Palaeohydrology; Recent epoch; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Suspended solids; Temporal variations

G0811
Dusty Glacier, Yukon; Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Slims River, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Micro-relief on a rock glacier, Dalton Range, Yukon, Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Permafrost and periglacial processes, v. 3, no. 1, Jan.-Mar. 1992, p. 41-47, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 73695.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1002/ppp.3430030106
Libraries: ACU

The micro-relief on the surface of a rock glacier in the Dalton Range of the southwest Yukon provides evidence of processes occurring during and after development of the rock glacier. Ridges, mounds and flow lobes are interpreted as indicators of either the continuing deformation or reactivation of an ice-core, solifluction of the surface deposits or changes in the internal hydrological system of the rock glacier. A glacial rather than periglacial origin for the ice core is preferred. (Au)

A, F, B, C, H
Creep; Deformation; Drainage; Flow; Formation; Frost action; Frost mounds; Glacial epoch; Glacial erosion; Glacial melt waters; Glaciation; Grasses; Groundwater; Hydrology; Lava; Lichens; Moraines; Movement; Plant cover; Pleistocene epoch; Pyroclastics; Rock glaciers; Sedimentary rocks; Shear zones (Ice); Shrubs; Size; Slopes; Soil profiles; Soils; Spatial distribution; Stratigraphy; Stress; Topography

G0811
Dalton Range, Yukon


Stagnant glacier ice, St. Elias Mountains, Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Geografiska annaler. Series A, Physical geography, v. 74A, no. 1, 1992, p. 13-19, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 53357.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/521466
Libraries: ACU

The extensive occurrence of glacier ice cores to landforms and deposits of the Neoglacial and Little Ice Age periods in the St. Elias Mountains of the southwest Yukon is described. These glacier ice cores were produced during active glaciation and have been preserved, in locations such as the Donjek Glacier moraine, for over 500 years. Incorporation of ice in landforms and deposits occurs during glacier surges, glacier advance or glacier backwasting as well as during stagnation of the glacier. The primary terrain ranges from sequences of moraines, providing a detailed record of glacier fluctuations, to ice contact landforms. The degradation of the ice-cored terrain is controlled by hydrological and glaciological processes, which expose the ice core, rather than by melt beneath the surficial materials. (Au)

F, A, B
Bottom sediments; Cores; Deglaciation; Drainage; Flow; Glacial deposits; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glaciation; Glacier ice; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Heat transmission; Mass balance; Mass wasting; Melting; Moraines; Rock glaciers; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Slopes; Solar radiation; Thaw flow slides; Valleys

G0811
Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Klutlan Glacier region, Yukon; Lowell Glacier, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon; Steele Glacier, Yukon


Glacio-fluvial investigations of the seasonal development of an alpine glacier drainage system, Yukon Territory [Des études fluvioglaciaires du développement saisonnier d'un système d'écoulement glaciaire, territoire du Yukon]   /   Kruszynski, G.A.   Johnson, P.G.
(Student research in Canada's North : proceedings of the Third National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, October 23-24, 1991 / Edited by W.O. Kupsch and J.F. Basinger. Musk-ox, no. 39, special publication, 1992, p. 9-14, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 34100.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Seasonal and daily variations in quantity and quality of meltwaters draining from Maxwell Glacier, Yukon Territory, were measured to assess the inter-relationships between subglacial sediment sources and meltwater routing within a glacierised drainage basin. Temporal variations in suspended sediment concentrations and meltwater hydrochemistry are both dependent on the form and development of the subglacial drainage system. Preliminary analysis suggests that variations of incoming radiation and air temperature were in phase with those of the hydrological characteristics. (Au)

F
Atmospheric temperature; Diurnal variations; Drainage; Glacial melt waters; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Seasonal variations; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Solar radiation

G0811
Maxwell Glacier, Yukon


Glacierized basin hydrological variability and climate change trends   /   Kruszynski, G.   Johnson, P.G.
Paper presented at the Northern Research Basins Conference, Whitehorse, Yukon, August 1992.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32967.
Languages: English

It has been proposed that trends in hydrological regimes may be used to indicate the progression of climate change. Hypothesis is that the natural variability in northern glacierized basins, including northern cordilleran as well as arctic basins, is of a magnitude that precludes the isolation of small-scale changes caused by climate change. The existence of glaciers in a basin compensates for changes in the annual input to a basin reducing annual coefficients of variation, but promoting seasonal variability within the regimes. Investigation of runoff in glacierized basins in southwest Yukon have demonstrated extreme variability a) at glacier termini, b) in the preglacial area and c) in the non-glacierized components of basins. Variability, a product of glaciological conditions, snow cover, progression and rate of spring melt, and occurrence and timing of summer storms is demonstrated by the conditions on the Slims River in 1983, an ice-melt dominated year, and 1988 a year dominated by rain on the non-glacierized component of the basin. Also the variability in discharge, suspended sediment, and timing of peak flows from a small glacier illustrates the problems in the upper Slims River basin. The discharge volumes and regimes, rate and timing of melt, rain-on-snow or ice, rain on saturated or unsaturated basin materials and the effect of glaciological conditions are so complex that the length of record required to isolate long-term climate change trends is prohibitive to analysis in northern regions. Monitoring of northern basins should continue, and be expanded wherever possible, for the expansion of knowledge of hydrological processes but should not be viewed as immediate input to climate change studies. (Au)

F, E
Climate change; Drainage; Effects of climate on ice; Effects of ice on climate; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Hydrology; Melting; River discharges; Rivers

G0811
Slims River, Yukon; Yukon


The development of an ice-dammed lake : the contemporary and older sedimentary record   /   Johnson, P.G.   Kasper, J.N.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 24, no. 4, Nov. 1992, p. 304-313, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 32966.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1551285
Libraries: ACU

An ice-dammed lake on the northern margin of the Kaskawulsh Glacier in the St. Elias Mountains has drained annually for at least 30 to 40 years. Input to the lake is from three glacierized sub-basins and from the margin of the Kaskawulsh Glacier. The deltas of the streams from each of the sub-basins are constructed and destroyed in each filling and draining cycle. There is little sediment accumulation in the lake basin due to subglacial drainage of the high density underflow input through most of the filling sequence. Older lacustrine sediments and deltas demonstrate previous higher level lakes, which were semi-permanent, during the early phases of deglaciation after the maximum of the Little Ice Age. One of the sub-basin glaciers is a surging glacier and a sequence of old deltas indicate that the location of the discharge stream has changed during each surge. It is hypothesized that continuing downwasting of the Kaskawulsh Glacier will eventually remove the conditions for damming. (Au)

F, B
Bottom sediments; Deglaciation; Drainage; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Glaciers; Recent epoch; River deltas; Sedimentation

G0811
Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon


Drainage of an ice-dammed lake, Kaskawulsh Glacier basin, Yukon   /   Kasper, J.N.   Johnson, P.G.
(Northern hydrology : selected perspectives : proceedings of the Northern Hydrology Symposium, 10-12 July 1990, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan / Edited by T.D. Prowse and C.S.L. Ommanney. NHRI symposium, no. 6, 1991, p. 177-188, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 32391.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Glacier ice-dammed lakes have been reported from all glacierized regions. The hazards posed by the catastrophic drainage of these lakes, particularly those located close to the glacier terminus, have been extensively studied. Many lakes in upper basin areas are not considered hazards but can be significant hydrologically and geomorphologically. A lake along the margin of the Kaskawulsh Glacier, 35 km from the terminus, drains annually. Ice margin flotation and conduit expansion due to frictional heat are prerequisites for lake drainage. Initiation of the drainage, however, requires connection to the main conduit system of the Kaskawulsh Glacier. Water balance figures indicate a substantial and continuous leakage from the lake. Discharge through a 35-km long conduit to the glacier terminus extends the period of drainage to 7 to 10 days compared to the 1 to 2 days for most terminus location lakes. (Au)

F
Drainage; Glacial melt waters; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Hydrology; River discharges; Suspended solids

G0811
Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon


Pulses in glacier discharge : indicators of the internal drainage system of glaciers   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Northern hydrology : selected perspectives : proceedings of the Northern Hydrology Symposium, 10-12 July 1990, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan / Edited by T.D. Prowse and C.S.L. Ommanney. NHRI symposium, no. 6, 1991, p. 165-175, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 32390.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Pulses in discharge measured at the termini of a number of glaciers in the southwest Yukon are similar to "extraordinary" events reported by Hooke (1989) and Rothlisberger and Lang (1987). The pulses are frequent occurrences and can be classified into four hydrograph patterns which can be interpreted as indicators of changes in the internal drainage system of the glaciers. The pulses are concentrated in the spring and early summer when linked conduit and channel drainage networks respond to the increased pressure from the springmelt. (Au)

F
Ablation; Drainage; Floods; Glacial melt waters; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier surges; Glaciers; River discharges

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon


Discharge regimes of a glacierized basin, Slims River, Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Northern hydrology : selected perspectives : proceedings of the Northern Hydrology Symposium, 10-12 July 1990, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan / Edited by T.D. Prowse and C.S.L. Ommanney. NHRI symposium, no. 6, 1991, p. 151-164, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 32389.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The discharge and suspended-sediment regimes of the Slims River for 1983 and 1988 contrast a glacier-melt dominated regime with a storm-run-off dominated regime. The Kaskawulsh Glacier basin in 65% glacierized and normally provides 80% of the flow of the river. The glacier-melt dominated regime peaks in August with discharges in the 250 m³/s to 350 m³/s (previously reported) range. Suspended-sediment concentrations are high and variable early in the season as the glacier-drainage system is being established and are lower and diurnal later in the season when the drainage system is established. The lower basin is 9% glacierized but instantaneous run-off from large storms can produce flood flows for the river. In 1988, a wet early July, superimposed on the snowmelt, saturated the basin and high precipitation on July 14 and 15 resulted in a peak Slims River discharge of 580 m³/s. Suspended-sediment concentrations were lower during the run-off-dominated period, but total loads were very high, with the primary sediment source from the lower basin not from the glacierized component. (Au)

F
Drainage; Floods; Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Hydrology; Precipitation (Meteorology); River discharges; Rivers; Runoff; Sedimentation; Snow; Suspended solids

G0811
Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Slims River, Yukon


Solute acquisition and sediment delivery at the base of an alpine glacier, Yukon Territory = Acquisition de soluté et production de sédiments à la base d'un glacier alpin, Territoire du Yukon   /   Kruszynski, G.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Third National Student Conference on Northern Studies : abstracts of papers / Sponsored by Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs and Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1991, p. 117-118
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 32229.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

During the ablation season of 1990, hourly and once daily observations were taken of suspended-sediment concentration, attached ionic loading and solute and concentration from meltwaters draining the Maxwell Glacier, Yukon Territory, Canada. Seasonal variations in suspended-sediment concentrations and meltwater hydrochemistry were used to assess the interrelationships between subglacial sediment sources and meltwater routing during an ablation season. The identification and analysis of individual minor cation species aided in the clarification of information regarding the development of basal structures as well as the interaction of meltwater with basal sediments throughout an ablation season. (Au)

F
Ablation; Diurnal variations; Glacial melt waters; Seasonal variations; Suspended solids; Temporal variations

G0811
Yukon


Suspended sediment transport in glacierized basins   /   Johnson, P.G.   Kruszynski, G.A.
Paper presented at the Canadian Hydrology Symposium, Burlington, Ontario, October 1990.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 31063.
Languages: English

Suspended sediment in streams in glacierized basins is generated from three sub-systems; the glacier, gravity deposits and glacial deposits. The glacier sediment regime has low concentrations in the spring, high and variable concentrations in the late spring and early summer which decline to lower concentrations with a diurnal rhythm during the mid to late summer. Generation of sediment from the gravity deposits occurs primarily during the spring with the basin snowmelt. The regime has low concentrations with localised pulses due to mud flows and debris flows on the slopes. Intense summer storms can also produce pulses of sediment when surface runoff occurs. The glacial deposits have a wide range of hydrological characteristics but suspended sediment generation occurs primarily in the spring, with snowmelt runoff, and in the summer due to rainstorms, ice-core melt and the effects of water input from the glacier. The overall regime of the glacierized basin is highly variable with irregular peaks throughout the summer due to release from the glacier and mass movements on the non-glacierized component of the basin. (Au)

B, F, E
Glacial deposits; Glacial erosion; Glacial melt waters; Glacial transport; Hydrology; Mass wasting; Runoff; Sedimentation; Snowmelt

G0811
St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


An ice dammed lake in the St. Elias Range, southwest Yukon Territory, water balance, physical limnology, ice dynamics and sedimentary processes   /   Kasper, J.N.   Johnson, P.G. [Supervisor]
Montreal, Quebec : University of Montreal, 1989.
1 v.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. ML53258)
Thesis (M.A.) - University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, 1989.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 30144.
Languages: English

The water balance of tributary basin to the Kaskawulsh Glacier system demonstrated that there is continual leakage from an annually draining ice dammed lake during the summer filling season. Lake drainage is initiated by floating of the ice margin with erosion of subglacial conducts connecting to the main drainage system of the glacier. Timing of drainage is therefore difficult to predict. Sedimentation in the lake reflects the annual filling and draining cycles with little deep water accumulation and deltas which form during transgressive water conditions and are destroyed during lake level fall. (Au)

F, B
Drainage; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier lakes; Sedimentation; Theses; Water level

G0811
St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Canadian landform examples - 9 : rock glaciers, southwest Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Canadian geographer, v. 32, no. 3, Fall 1988, p. 277-280, ill., map)
References.
ASTIS record 73694.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1541-0064.1988.tb00880.x
Libraries: ACU

... In Canada, rock glaciers are common in all glacierized and previously glaciated mountainous regions, especially in the alpine and sub-alpine zones of the Cordilleran region and in the Subarctic. They are less common in the High Arctic, probably owing to the colder climate and consequently lower rates of glacial erosion, which preclude one of the formation processes - the mantling of glacier ice by debris. ... Two distinct types of rock glaciers occur in southwest Yukon. One results directly from glaciation, with the production of abundant debris over glacier ice. The other forms during and after deglaciation, when instabilities develop in deposits and when ice included in these deposits responds to climatic change. (Au)

A, F, B, E
Cirques; Classification; Creep; Deformation; Deglaciation; Effects of climate on ice; Flow; Formation; Geological time; Glaciation; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Landslides; Melting; Moraines; Quaternary period; Rock glaciers; Rocks; Slopes; Spatial distribution; Valleys

G0811
Aishihik Lake region, Yukon; Auriol Range, Yukon; Dalton Range, Yukon; Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Donjek Range, Yukon; Duke River region, Yukon; Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Kluane Glacier, Yukon; Kluane Lake region, Yukon; Kluane Ranges, Yukon; Klutlan Glacier, Yukon; Lowell Glacier, Yukon; Metalline Creek region, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Student research in Canada's North : proceedings of the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, November 18-19, 1986 = Les recherches des étudiants dans le Nord canadien : actes de la Conférence nationale des étudiants en études nordiques, 18-19 novembre 1986   /   Adams, W.P. [Editor]   Johnson, P.G. [Editor]   Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies [Sponsor]
Ottawa : ACUNS, 1988.
596 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
ISBN 0-921421-02-8
References.
ASTIS record 45491.
Languages: English or French
Libraries: ACU

The papers in this volume include the majority of the presentations made at the first National Student Conference on Northern Studies, held at the Conference Centre, Ottawa, 18-19 November 1986. The purpose of the Conference was to bring together the best Northern Studies students in Canada. The objective was that this "next generation" of Northern scholars should get to know each other and become familiar with each other's work. The meetings were organized into oral and poster sessions within which presenters were instructed to address 'their peers in other disciplines'. Behind this instruction, indeed, behind the design of the entire conference, was the belief that Northern Studies scholars should be (unusually) familiar with and sentitive to the multidisciplinary context of their research. It is no longer efficient or appropriate that, for example, a geophysicist should conduct research in the North without a strong appreciation of the social, political and historical contexts of his/her work, or that an historian working in Northern Studies should not be familiar with the environmental and political contexts of the research concerned. At the meetings, contacts were established between Northern students who live and study in the North, students who are northern residents studying in the South, and the large number who live in the South but conduct research in the North. ... (Au)

X, A, B, T, R, I, J, C, E, F, H
Biology; Climate change; Ecology; Geography; Geology; Government; Hydrology; Land use; Native peoples; Natural area preservation; Physical geography; Recreation; Research; Soils

G081
Canadian Arctic


Glaciation locale pendant le Pléistocène supérieur et l'Holocène dans la chaîne Ruby, au sud-ouest du Territoire du Yukon [Local glaciation during the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene in the Ruby Range, south-western Yukon]   /   Lacasse, D.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Student research in Canada's North : Proceedings of the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, November 18-19, 1986 / Edited by W. Peter Adams and Peter G. Johnson. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1988, p. 103-111, ill., 1 map
References.
Abstract in English and French.
ASTIS record 34072.
Languages: French
Libraries: ACU

Since the end of the last glaciation of the Pleistocene, the glacier fronts in the south-western Yukon have fluctuated at various times. A relative chronology of glacier fluctuation can be established by dating the till deposited by the cirque glaciers of the Ruby Range. Given the geographical position and the present climatic characteristics, the presence of cirque glaciers in this range and their fluctuations during the Holocene must mean that palaeoclimatic conditions were different from those of today. Results obtained indicate at least three glacial readvances occurring earlier than 1200 years BP. These readvances were not necessarily synchronized from one cirque to the next. The problem is to determine whether these glaciers date from the end of the Pleistocene or from the Holocene. Samples were taken from the moraines of three cirques of similar orientation and altitude. By determining the age of the moraines a relative chronology of the multiple glacial fluctuations of the Ruby Range was established. We were able to draw up this partial chronology using the degree of development of the vegetation, the soil and the lichen Rhizocarpon geographicum s1, and from the tephrochronology. Most of the moraines examined appear to date from the end of the Pleistocene. In one of the cirques, however, there are huge semi-permanent snow masses lodged between the moraine and the interior slope. On this moraine certain characteristics of the factors studied and mentioned above are less developed than in other locations. This suggests that the moraine in question may have come into existence at the beginning of the Holocene. (Au)

F, B
Cirques; Glacial deposits; Glaciation; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Pleistocene epoch; Recent epoch

G0811
Ruby Range, Yukon


Rock glaciers of the Dalton Range, Kluane Ranges, south-west Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.   Lacasse, D.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 34, no.118, 1988, p. 327-332)
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 29101.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Glaciated valleys of the Dalton Range in the south-west Yukon are dominated by rock glaciers identified as glacier ice-cored debris systems. The two rock glaciers studied have different amounts of deformation at present, resulting from post-formation mechanics. The primary formation of lobes of the rock glaciers resulted from periods of glacier activity in the Neoglacial, although older lobes, probably late Pleistocene in age, occur below the Neoglacial lobes. The hydrological systems of the rock glaciers have played a major role in the post-formation deformation of the land forms and the present drainage system is entirely sub-surface. The explanation for the extensive occurrence of rock glaciers in the Dalton Range is lithological as a result of the high susceptibility of the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous sediments to frost action and glacier erosion. (Au)

A
Frost action; Glacial erosion; Rock glaciers; Valleys

G0811
Dalton Range, Yukon


Impacts on river discharge of changes in glacierized components of mountain basins   /   Johnson, P.G.   David, C.
(Water pollution research journal of Canada, v. 22, no. 4, 1987, p. 518-529, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 73711.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

A reliable and predictable water supply is essential to any development in mountainous regions. Large glacierized components of basins can produce surplus or deficit conditions as climate changes from season to season and as the ice extent fluctuates through time. Shorter time frame glaciological changes can produce stream diversion, catastrophic floods or very irregular flow regimes. The major impact on water quality is the high level of and variations in sediment load concentrations which occur with the regime fluctuation. Sediment concentration regimes occur both in phase and out of phase with flow regimes. (Au)

F, A, E
Atmospheric temperature; Deglaciation; Diurnal variations; Drainage; Floods; Flow; Glacial melt waters; Glaciation; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Glaciers; Hydrography; Hydrology; Melting; Moraines; Mountains; Rain; River discharges; Rivers; Runoff; Seasonal variations; Sediment transport; Stream flow; Suspended solids; Temporal variations; Water quality; Watersheds

G0811, G0821, G0822, G06, G13
Alps, Europe; Bow River, Alberta; Columbia River, Washington; Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Donjek, Lake, Yukon; Grizzly Glacier, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Kaskawulsh River, Yukon; Kluane Lake, Yukon; Kluane River, Yukon; Louise, Lake, region, Alberta; Lowell Glacier, Yukon; Norway; Peyto Glacier, Alberta; Slims River, Yukon; Variegated Glacier, Alaska


Holocene paleohydrology of the St. Elias Mountains, British Columbia and Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Géographie physique et quaternaire, v. 40, no 1, 1986, p. 47-53, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 73704.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.7202/032622ar
Libraries: ACU

The evolution of the Holocene paraglacial environment of the St. Elias Mountains has been dominated by hydrological variations which modify the direct glacial depositional environment and trigger instabilities in valley side glacial and talus deposits. Data from the Kaskawulsh Glacier demonstrate how discharge and sediment transport regimes vary through the season, as sediment is flushed out of the system, and a marginal to subglacial drainage change of the Grizzly Creek Glacier illustrates the effects of extraordinary events in transporting large volumes of sediment. A multiple glacier fluctuation model applied to the region produces rapid temporal changes in discharge and sediment regimes throughout the Holocene. The effect of these variations is enhanced by the occurrence of surges of many of the glaciers of the St. Elias Mountains and by sequences of glacier dammed lake formation and drainage in the region. (Au)

B, F, A
Cores; Deglaciation; Drainage; Geomorphology; Glacial deposits; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glacier ice; Glacier lake outbursts; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Glacier variations; Mathematical models; Moraines; Palaeohydrology; Periglacial landforms; Recent epoch; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Valleys

G0811, G0821
St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Glaciation locale pendant le Pléistocène supérieur et l'Holocène dans les chaines Ruby et Dalton, dans le sud-ouest du territoire du Yukon   /   Lacasse, D.   Johnson, P.G. [Supervisor]
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, 1986.
1 v.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. ML53811)
Thesis (M.Sc.) - University of Ottawa, Dept. of Geography, Ottawa, Ont., 1986.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28305.
Languages: French

Depuis la fin de la dernière glaciation du Pléistocène les fronts des glaciers du sud-ouest du Yukon ont fluctué à diverses périodes. Une chronologie relative des fluctuations glaciaires peut être établie par la datation des dépôts morainiques laissés par les glaciers de cirque de la chaîne Ruby. Compte tenu de la position géographique et des caractéristiques climatiques actuelles, la présence de glaciers de cirque au sein de cete chaîne et leurs fluctuations durant l'Holocène nécessitent des conditions paléoclimatiques différentes de celles d'aujourd'hui. Selon des divers résultats obtenus, on peut déceler au moins trois réavancées glaciaires qui datent d'avant 1200 ans BP. Ces réavancées n'ont pas été nécessairement synchronisées d'un cirque à l'autre. Le problème reste à déterminer si ces glaciers datent de la fin du Pléistocène ou de l'Holocène. Les moraines de trois cirques d'orientation et d'altitude semblables ont été échantillonnées. De façon relative, une chronologie des multifluctuations glaciaires de la chaîne Ruby a été établie en déterminant l'âge des moraines. Le degré de développement de la végétation, du sol et du lichen Rhizocarpon geographicum si ainsi que la téphrochronologie nous ont permis d'établir cette chronologie partielle. Par contre on trouve d'énormes plaques de neige semi-permanentes nichées entre la moraine et le versant à l'intérieur de l'un des cirques. Sur cette moraine, certaines caractéristiques des facteurs étudiés et mentionnés ci-dessus sont moins developpées qu'ailleurs. Ceci porte à croire que cette moraine aurait été édifiée au début de l'Holocène. (Au)

A, B, E
Effects of climate on ice; Glacial epoch; Glaciation; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Moraines; Pleistocene epoch; Recent epoch; Theses

G0811
Ruby Range, Yukon


Drainage characteristics of a glacier dammed lake, Kaskawulsh Glacier Basin, southwest Yukon Territory   /   Kasper, J.N.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Student research in Canada's North : Proceedings of the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, November 18-19, 1986 / Edited by W. Peter Adams and Peter G. Johnson. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1988, p. 92-97, ill., maps
References.
Abstract in English and French.
ASTIS record 28303.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Kaskawulsh Glacier, located in the St. Elias Range, Yukon Territory, dams a small lake against its northern margin in a tributary drainage basin and close to the accumulation zone. The lake has a history of annual drainage events producing a series of yearly depositional sequences. The lake is fed by meltwater originating from the Kaskawulsh Glacier and from three small valley glaciers located within the basin. The mean temperature for the influent meltwater is less than 1° C from the Kaskawulsh, and ranges between 2.7° C and 4.0° C for the three tributary streams. The variations in influent water temperature produce temperature profiles which increase with depth. Water current speeds indicated sediment movement into the lake at the bed and at locations through the water column. The different sediment levels were produced by turbidity currents resulting from the temperature and suspended sediment contrasts. High sediment loads in the input streams from the basin coupled with the progressive rise in lake level throughout the season lead to the formation of retrogressive annual deltaic sequences. Despite this transgressive action, the maximum lake levels have been regressing throughout the post-Neoglacial period. (Au)

F
Bottom sediments; Drainage; Glacial melt waters; Glacier lakes; Glaciers; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Water level

G0811
Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Glaciological conditions and geomorphological interpretation   /   Johnson, P.G.
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, [1984?].
20, 4 leaves ; ill. ; 28 cm.
(Research notes - University of Ottawa. Dept. of Geography = Notes de recherches - Universite d'Ottawa. Dép de Géographie, no. 43)
References.
ASTIS record 16214.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The paper draws on examples from the Pennines of northern England and the St. Elias and Ruby Ranges of the southwest Yukon to demonstrate the importance of the construction of a glaciological model before interpreting glacial geomorphological history. (Au)

F, A
Geomorphology; Glaciology; Recent epoch

G0811
Ruby Range, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Holocene glaciological conditions, southwest Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, [1984?].
19, 4 leaves : ill., map ; 28 cm.
(Research notes - University of Ottawa. Dept. of Geography = Notes de recherches - Universite d'Ottawa. Dép de Géographie, no. 44)
References.
ASTIS record 16213.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Glaciation of the southwest Yukon during the Holocene was dominated by the St. Elias Icefield and its large outlet glaciers and by smaller ice caps and glaciers in the Donjek and Kluane Ranges. There have been a number of fluctuations of these glaciers through the Holocene as a result of climatic response differences between the large and small icefields and the superimposition of surge events on the general fluctuation pattern. The pattern of glacial advances support multi-fluctuation models for the Holocene. However, paucity of datable material has precluded a determination of synchroneity or non-synchroneity of the fluctuations. (Au)

F
Glaciation; Glacier variations; Recent epoch

G0811
Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Kluane Ranges, Yukon


Geomorphology as an additional variable in assessing solute dynamics of an alpine basin   /   Smith, R.   Johnson, P.G.
Paper presented to Canadian Association of Geographers, Nanaimo, 1984.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 27587.
Languages: English

The effect of geomorphology on stream hydrochemistry of the headwater lake basin of Gladstone Creek was investigated from June 1st to August 23rd, 1981. This catchment is situated in the Ruby Range of the Yukon Plateau, Southwest Yukon Territory (61 24 N / 138 24 W). The study was designed to identify landform influence on the hydrochemical loading of the streams feeding the lake. Spatial and temporal solute behaviour was used as an indicator of landform effect. Input and output samples for five landforms surrounding the headwater lake were investigated. Based on hydrochemical results the following conclusions were made: (1) The varying morphologies and diverse lithologies of unconsolidated deposits along the valley and sides of the basin significantly influenced stream hydrochemical loading. (2) The talus and rock glacier streams were more concentrated than those which drained vegetated alluvial fans. (3) Higher solute concentrations occurred during the snow melt and precipitation period (rainstorms dominated between June 5th and July 6th). (Au)

F, A
Chemical properties; Geomorphology; Lakes; Rivers

G0811
Gladstone Creek region, Yukon


Rock glacier formation by high-magnitude low-frequency slope processes in the southwest Yukon   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Annals of the Association of American Geographers, v. 74, no. 3, Sept. 1984, p. 408-419, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 17393.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1467-8306.1984.tb01463.x
Libraries: ACU

In the southwest Yukon, valley walls mantled by talus and glacial deposits have been modified by a variety of catastrophic processes. Avalanches, landslides, mudflows, and retrogressive slope failures have been triggered by a variety of internal and external causes. These flow mechanisms produce a range of landforms in the paraglacial environment that dominate the landscape, particularly in the higher mountain zones. Models of rock glacier formation resulting from retrogressive slope failures, high hydrostatic pressures, and avalanche activity are proposed. (Au)

A, F
Landslides; Mass wasting; Rock glaciers

G0811
Yukon


Rock glaciers, a case for a change in nomenclature   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Geografiska annaler. Series A, Physical geography, v. 65A, no. 1-2, 1983, p. 27-34, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 53358.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/520718
Libraries: ACU

The connotation of the term rock glacier, has been one of a common origin form but it is increasingly apparent that we are studying a range of landforms which, with the exception of the glacier debris system type, have no relationship with glaciers. The approach to rock glaciers as a unique form is re-evaluated in the light of the vast numbers which occur in the southwest Yukon. The implications are that they are the norm not the unusual in the development of the proglacial landscape and that correctly identified will provide new evidence for post glaciation landscape evolution. (Au)

A, F, B
Avalanches; Creep; Deformation; Flow; Geological time; Geomorphology; Glacial transport; Glaciation; Glacier variations; Landforms; Mass wasting; Measurement; Movement; Physical properties; Pleistocene epoch; Recent epoch; Rock glaciers; Sediment transport; Slopes; Strain; Valleys

G0811
Donjek River region, Yukon; Duke River region, Yukon; Gladstone Creek region, Yukon; Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Kluane Ranges, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Problems of Quaternary glacial correlation due to regional ice/local ice interactions, Ruby Range, southwest Yukon   /   Kodybka, R.J.   Johnson, P.G.
In: Symposium on correlations of Quaternary chronologies, Atkinson College, York University. - [S.l.] : Geo Books, 1983, p. 411-422, maps
References.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 27184.
Languages: English

In the southwest Yukon currently glacierized regions are very close to unglaciated areas. The Ruby Range, within the transition area, is a zone which was influenced by converging regional ice in the early to mid Pleistocene and by local ice in the late Pleistocene. The major problem to the interpretation of the Quaternary are the glaciological conditions which must have occurred and the difficulties of dating all the glacial events identified in the field. (Au)

B, A
Geological time; Glacial geology; Pleistocene epoch

G0811
Ruby Range, Yukon


Vegetation, microclimate and soil, as influenced by slope and exposure, Grizzly Creek, St. Elias Mt. Range, Yukon Territory   /   Leverton, D.   Johnson, P.G. [Supervisor]
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, 1981.
ix, 149 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. MK48574)
ISBN 9780315007161
Thesis (M.A.) - University Of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., 1981.
Indexed from a PDF file acquired from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 71343.
Languages: English
Libraries: OONL

The vegetation, soils and microclimates of 3 different exposures along a transect in a small valley on Grizzly Creek in the Donjek Range of the St. Elias Mountains were examined. Seventeen regularly spaced vegetation quadrates were sampled and soils and microclimatic data were obtained from the midpoints of each slope. A total of 54 plant species were found and estimates were made of the frequency of occurrence and the percent cover of each plant species. Direct amounts of incoming solar radiation, mean soil, soil subsurface and air temperatures, relative humidity, precipitation and wind direction were measured daily between June 9, 1979 and July 13, 1979. The microclimates of the north-, south- and east-facing slopes were found to be different and this was reflected in the soi1 properties and rates of soil development. The availability of essential macronutrients P, K+, Ca++ Mg and N were also examined between sites. Major differences occurred in the concentrations of available and exchangeable cations and the depth of distribution of the various macronutrients. Only 33 percent of the total number of plant species were common to all 3 study areas. The species present and the relative dominance of the various species was found to be related to the aforementioned biotic and abiotic controls. For example, mosses were the most abundant form of vegetation on the nutrient-poor north-facing slope whereas grasses tended to dominate the nutrient-rich south-facing slope. The intervening east-facing slope had the highest species diversity of the 3 sites. (Au)

A, H, J, E, F, C
Active layer; Albedo; Alpine tundra ecology; Aspect; Effects of climate on plants; Effects of temperature on plants; Flowers; Formation; Glacial deposits; Growing season; Measurement; Microclimatology; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Permafrost; Phosphorus; Photosynthesis; Plant cover; Plant distribution; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Plant respiration; Plant succession; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Roots; Slopes; Snow; Soil chemistry; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Soils; Solar radiation; Theses; Topography; Treeline; Winds

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon


The structure of a talus-derived rock glacier deduced from its hydrology   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 18, no. 9, Sept. 1981, p.1422-1430, figures)
References.
ASTIS record 7339.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e81-133
Libraries: ACU

The paper presents the results of an experiment in the use of hydrological parameters to study the internal structure of a rock glacier. The rock glacier selected for the study lies at the head of Grizzly Creek in the southwest Yukon Territory. The hydrological network suggests two independent drainage systems, which demonstrate the occurrence of a planar impervious structure at depth and independent lines of drainage controlled by the flow structures in the near-surface deposits. Chemical changes in the water are inconclusive with respect to the evaluation of ice contents of the landform although the physical evidence strongly suggests no massive ice component. Chemical characteristics of each drainage system are sufficiently different that chemical tests can be used to differentiate sources of the drainage. (Au)

A, F
Drainage; Glaciers; River discharges; Rock glaciers

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W), Yukon


Cirque multiple glaciation, Grizzly Creek, Yukon Territory, and palaeoclimatic implications   /   Kristjansson, F.J.   Johnson, P.G. [Supervisor]
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, 1980.
vi, 55 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. MK48558)
ISBN 0-315-00700-1
Thesis (M.A.) - University Of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., 1980.
Indexed from a PDF file acquired from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses.
References.
ASTIS record 71339.
Languages: French
Libraries: OONL

A morphostratigraphic investigation of the latest Pleitocene and Holocene deposits of Grizzly Creek, Yukon Territory and environs was conducted. Basic objectives were (1) to describe the late Quaternary stratigraphy of Grizzly Creek, (2) to place any defined stratigraphic sequence within a precise chronologic framework, (3) to interpret the Grizzly Creek sequence with respect to any defined regional stratigraphy, and (4) to discuss the paleoclimatic implications. With regard to the last objective, gradual vs abrupt climatic change, and Denton and Karlen's model concerning Holocene climatic variability is discussed. Emphasis is placed on Denton and Karlen's research. The data derived during field research at Grizzly Creek provides support for Denton and Karlen's model concerning Holocene climatic variation. It was not possible, however, to derive a definitive statement in support of their model. In this regard, the difficulties involved in the establishment and association of a precise chronologic framework proved a major barrier. (Au)

A, E, B, F
Climate change; Deglaciation; Effects of climate on ice; Flow; Glacial deposits; Glacial epoch; Glacial landforms; Glaciation; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Laurentide Ice Sheet; Mathematical models; Moraines; Palaeoclimatology; Palaeogeography; Pleistocene epoch; Pyroclastics; Quaternary period; Radiocarbon dating; Recent epoch; Rock glaciers; Sedimentation; Stratigraphy; Theses; Weathering

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Icefield Ranges, Yukon; Mirror Creek region, Alaska/Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Glacier-rock glacier transition in the southwest Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 12, no. 2, May 1980, p. 195-204, ill., figures, photos.)
References.
ASTIS record 4643.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550516
Libraries: ACU

In the southwest Yukon Territory rock glaciers of both the glacier debris system type and the talus type are common. In addition there are many examples of the transition between glaciers and the glacier-ice-cored type of feature. The glacier-ice-cored forms characteristically develop within or emanate from cirque basins where the formation of a complete debris cover of the glacier surface has been possible. Flow of these rock glaciers is due to periods of glacier advance with some secondary deformation of the ice under the debris cover after the retreat of the glacier. This secondary deformation accounts for movements measured at the present day. Comparisons are made among an ice-cored moraine system, a transitional form, and a large glacier-ice-cored rock glacier. The different flow lobes of the Grizzly Creek Rock Glacier indicate a number of periods of glacier activity in post Pleistocene times which may fit with the Denton and Karlen Holocene fluctuation model. (Au)

A, F
Glacial landforms; Glaciation; Moraines; Rock glaciers

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Yukon


Rock glaciers : glacial and non-glacial origins   /   Johnson, P.G.
(World Glacier Inventory : proceedings of the workshop at Riederalp, Switzerland, 17-22 September 1978 / organized by the Temporary Technical Secretariat for the World Glacier Inventory = Inventaire mondial des glaciers : actes de l'Atelier de Riederalp, Suisse, 17-22 septembre 1978 / organisé par le Secrétariat technique temporaire pour l'Inventaire mondial des glaciers. IAHS-AISH publication, no. 126, 1980, p. 285-293, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 71350.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The general term rock glacier has been widely applied to all major rock mass movement forms in alpine conditions without any understanding of the flow mechanisms involved. Investigations in the southwest Yukon Territory of Canada have shown that a number of mechanisms are operative in their formation with a major difference between those of glacial and non-glacial origin. Glacial origin rock glaciers reflect the glacial history of an area whilst non-glacial rock glaciers are not directly related to glacier activity and their activity periods differ from the glacial rock glaciers. Various origins of non-glacial rock glaciers have been proposed. For inclusion in the glacier inventory some distinction as to the type of rock glacier is essential in order to distinguish between glacier controls and periglacial (talus) controls. (Au)

F, A
Ablation; Avalanches; Deformation; Flow; Formation; Glaciation; Glacier ice; Glaciers; Glaciers; Landslides; Mass wasting; Measurement; Moraines; Movement; Periglacial landforms; Rock glaciers; Slopes

G0811
Duke River region, Yukon; Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Grizzly Glacier, Yukon


Rock glacier types and their drainage systems, Grizzly Creek, Yukon Territory   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 15, no. 9, Sept. 1978, p.1496-1507, ill., maps)
Originally presented at the Canadian Association of Geographers Conference, Laval University, Quebec, 25 May 1976.
ASTIS record 888.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e78-155
Libraries: ACU

Moraine rock glaciers, talus-derived rock glaciers, and avalanche rock glaciers are described from Grizzly Creek. The main moraine rock glacier has a number of flow lobes of different ages as indicated by lichen and vegetation development. ... Meltwater drainage through the landform is slow, allowing precipitation of the suspended sediment load, and as resurgences do not occur for all of the inflow the possibilities of addition to the ice core or drainage below Grizzly Creek gravels are discussed. ... (Au)

A, F
Drainage; Glaciers; Rock glaciers

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon


Environmental controls on geomorphic processes, Grizzly Creek, south-west Yukon Territory   /   Johnson, P.G.
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, [1975?].
108 leaves ; ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Research notes - University of Ottawa. Dept. of Geography = Notes de recherches - Universite d'Ottawa. Dép de Géographie, no. 9)
Appendix.
References.
Contents: 1. Valley climate. A basic presentation of data 1974 and 1975 / P.G. Johnson - 2. Vegetation and wildlife / D. Cossette - 3. Hydrological investigations 1975 / C. Lok - 4. Grizzly Creek glacier ice-cored moraine system / P.G. Johnson - 5. Rock flow forms in Grizzly Creek / D. Conway - 6. Mass movement landforms and processes / P.G. Johnson.
ASTIS record 71468.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This report is a preliminary presentation of data collected during two field seasons in Grizzly Creek, Kluane National Park southwest Yukon Territory (FIG. 1-1). Both field seasons covered a period of six weeks in July and August 1974 and 1975 under the direction of Dr. P.G. Johnson, Department of Geography an Regional Planning, University of Ottawa, and with the financial backing of the National Research Council of Canada. Many of the hypotheses developed in this collection of papers will be tested during the course of the 1976 field season and will be the subject of expanded reports after the completion of the field programme. The six sections of the report represent the major components of the study. First, the measurement of the basic climatic parameters as an essential input to the other process oriented studies. Second, a study of the ecological situation in the valley. Third, a study of the glacier controlled hydrological regime of the creek. Fourth, investigations of the processes of degradation and mass movement of ice cored landforms of which there are numerous types in the valley. D. Cossette was in charge of the biological and botanical programme and C. Lok was responsible for the hydrological programme. (Au)

F, A, E, I, H
Animals; Avalanches; Cores; Diurnal variations; Drainage; Glacial deposits; Glacial melt waters; Glacier ice; Glaciers; Glaciology; Hydrology; Mass wasting; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Moraines; Movement; Plants (Biology); River discharges; Rivers; Rock glaciers; Sediment transport; Stream flow; Suspended solids; Taiga ecology; Temporal variations; Weather stations; Winds

G0811
Grizzly Creek (61 11 N, 139 04 W) region, Yukon; Grizzly Glacier, Yukon; Kluane National Park and Reserve, Yukon


A form and process response study of a terminal ice cored ablation moraine   /   Ross, A.B.   Johnson, P.G. [Supervisor]
Ottawa : University of Ottawa, 1975.
ix, 178, 30, v p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. EC52423)
Thesis (M.A.) - University Of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., 1975.
Indexed from a PDF file acquired from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 71347.
Languages: English
Libraries: OONL

The initiation and distribution of certain types of degradational processes together with resultant topographical changes on an ice cored moraine were studied in terms of the variation in micro climatic and glacial surge inputs operating on it. The study was conceived in terms of a process-response model. The study area was located on a large arcuate shaped ice cored end moraine, which rims the terminus of the Donjek Valley Glacier located in the Donjek Valley, St. Elias Mountains, Yukon Territory. The end moraine lies approximately 0.8 to 2.7 Km downvalley from the present position of the glacier and is detached from it. The regional climate of the area was determined from data collected from a nearby government operated meteorological station. Climatic inputs occurring on or near the moraine surface, from June 1 to July 25, 1972, were obtained from two micro meteorological stations located directly on its surface. All data was abstracted and shown on graphs as mean daily values. The number of days that one station exceeded the other either/or on a mean daily basis and over three hour intervals, was also noted over the study period. ... (Au)

F, E, A, C
Ablation; Cores; Crystals; Diurnal variations; Effects of climate on ice; Evaporation; Glacial deposits; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glacier ice; Glacier surges; Glaciers; Heat transmission; Mathematical models; Measurement; Microclimatology; Moraines; Seasonal variations; Slopes; Soil temperature; Soil texture; Soils; Solar radiation; Temperature; Temporal variations; Thermal properties; Theses; Topography; Weather stations

G0811
Burwash Landing, Yukon; Donjek River region, Yukon; St. Elias Mountains, Alaska/British Columbia/Yukon


Mass movement processes in Metalline Creek, southwest Yukon Territory   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Arctic, v. 28, no. 2, June 1975, p. 130-139, ill., figures)
ASTIS record 10299.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic28-2-130.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2824
Libraries: ACU

In Metalline Creek, a small valley in the Kluane Range of the southwest Yukon Territory, the glacial deposits and the talus material have been affected by mass movement processes promoted by the occurrence of glacier ice and ice formed from avalanche snow. In addition, minor periglacial mass movement processes occur in the valley. Variations in the type of process are attributed to altitudinal changes, to aspect, and to change in the height of the regional snow line during the Neoglacial period. (Au)

A, F

G0811
Metalline Creek region, Yukon


Variations in the degradation of neoglacial ice-cored moraines, St. Elias Mountains, Yukon Territory   /   Johnson, P.G.
In: International geography, 1972 : papers submitted to the 22nd International Geographical Congress, Canada = La géographie internationale : communications présentées au 22e Congrés international de géographie, Canada / Edited by W.P. Adams and F.M. Helleiner. - Toronto : U of T Press, 1972, v. 1, p. 29-31
Paper no. p0115.
ASTIS record 71467.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Most of the Neoglacial moraines of the valley glaciers of the eastern St Elias Mountains are ice-cored. Four examples are the Klutlan glacier (Rampton 1970), the Donjek glacier (Denton and Stuiver 1966; author's observations 1970), the Kluane glacier, and the Kaskawulsh glacier (author's observations 1971). The distinct sedimentary structure and crystalline form of the ice cores indicate that it is stagnant glacier ice. This contrasts with the observations of Gunnar Østrem (1959; 1962; 1964) in Scandinavia which indicate that ice coring is of snow bank ice. The ice core is overlain by up to 5 m of till, measured on the Donjek moraine, and the processes of degradation are similar on the moraines of the four glaciers. The degree of degradation varies considerably and investigations on the Donjek and Kaskawulsh moraines were carried out to determine the controls on the degradational processes and the variations in the degree of degradation. The processes of degradation of the moraines are controlled by the ice core which exists, or existed, extensively in each of the moraine systems. These processes form a continuum from cracking of the till, due to its movement as a solid material, to flow of the material in a very liquid state where the ice core has been exposed. The cracking, caused by movement along the saturated ice till interface in the moraine, usually occurs parallel to and along the ridge crests of the moraines. This is the result of the close relationship between the ice surface morphology and the moraine surface morphology. An increase in the degree of saturation at the ice/till interface results in the occurrence of mass movements of material. The plane of movement of slips on the Donjek moraine is partly composed of the ice/till interface zone. An absence of structure in the mass movement deposits is thought to be due to initiation of the movement along the highly saturated interface before the water content of the rest of the till would be sufficient to initiate the movement. ... The Kaskawulsh glacier is one of the few glaciers in the area which has not been known to surge. The moraines of the glacier show a fairly advanced stage of degradation but there is little evidence for the very rapid rates of erosion associated with the exposure of the ice core, as observed on the Donjek moraine. Most of the morphological signs of degradational processes are stabalised cracks which are indicative of ice core melt beneath the till cover. The surges of the Klutlan glacier have not produced the amount of degradation that those of the Kluane glacier appear to have done. Variations in the microclimates of the valleys of the St Elias Mountains are responsible for the varying stages of degradation of the ice-cored moraines. This is due to effects on vegetation colonization and on heat input to the till. The effect of microclimatic factors is partly obscured by the superimposed effects of surges of some of the glaciers which has rapidly accelerated the rate of erosion by exposing the ice cores of the moraines. (Au)

A, B, F, E, H
Cores; Crystals; Effects of climate on ice; Erosion; Flow; Fracturing; Glacial deposits; Glacier ice; Glacier surges; Glacier variations; Heat transmission; Mass wasting; Melting; Microclimatology; Moraines; Movement; Plant cover; Revegetation; Solar radiation; Winds

G0811
Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Kluane Glacier, Yukon; Klutlan Glacier region, Yukon


The morphological effects of surges on the Donjek Glacier, St Elias Mountains, Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 11, no. 62, 1972, p. 227-234, ill., maps)
(Icefield Ranges Research Project, scientific results, v. 4, 1974, p. 253-258, ill., maps)
References.
The titles of the two articles are slightly different.
IRRP title: "The morphological effects of surges on the Donjek Glacier, St. Elias Mountains."
ASTIS record 66486.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The present surge of the Donjek Glacier on the northeast side of the St Elias Mountains, first noticed in 1969, is producing a number of morphological effects adjacent to the glacier in the terminus area. Although the effects of the surge are minimized by the lobate form of the glacier terminus, several types of push structure, erosional forms, and certain drainage changes are being produced. These forms are similar to older forms close to, or on, the Neoglacial maximum moraine. It is considered that the similarities suggest that surges may have occurred throughout most of the Neoglacial period. (Au)

F, A
Crevasses; Dead ice; Glacial erosion; Glacial landforms; Glacier surges; Moraines

G0811
Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Donjek River region, Yukon


A possible advanced Hypsithermal position of the Donjek Glacier   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Arctic, v. 25, no. 4, Dec. 1972, p. 302-305, ill., maps)
(Icefield Ranges Research Project, scientific results, v. 4, 1974, p. 249-251, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 10203.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic25-4-302.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2975
Libraries: ACU

The history of the [Donjek] glacier from 1935 to the present is well documented photographically .... Documentation of the Hypsithermal and Wisconsin history of the glacier is less abundant. ... During the summer of 1970 the terminus area of the Donjek Glacier and the lower part of the glacier valley were investigated for evidence of its Hypsithermal position. No evidence was found in the valley occupied by the glacier to indicate that it had retreated back into the valley from the Donjek River Valley. The inclusion of 'Slims Soil' ... in the material of the Neoglacial moraine complex of the glacier indicates that there must have been some retreat up valley of the moraine position before the Neoglacial re-advance. Down valley from the Neoglacial moraines there is evidence for a relatively recent, probably Hypsithermal, ice marginal position. This evidence is in the form of a lateral moraine, terminal moraine remnants and the distribution and development of the Hypsithermal Slims Soil and volcanic ash. Unfortunately no material was found which could be dated by radiocarbon techniques to verify the age of the features. The glacial landforms are relatively easily identified when compared with the highly denuded forms which represent the pre-Neoglacial periods found elsewhere in the Donjek Valley. ... It is considered that there is evidence for a stable phase of the Donjek and Kluane Glaciers late in the Hypsithermal period. This position is down valley of the Neoglacial maximum position which contrasts with the documented situation in the Kaskawulsh Valley. Late in the Hypsithermal the glaciers retreated from this stable position, the Kluane Glacier retreating to a Neoglacial position 15 miles up valley and the Donjek Glacier apparently retreating only a short distance before readvancing to its Neoglacial maximum position. (Au)

F, A, B, C
Deglaciation; Flow; Glacial deposits; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Loess; Moraines; Palaeopedology; Pyroclastics; Recent epoch; Spatial distribution; Valleys; Weathering

G0811
Donjek Glacier, Yukon; Donjek River region, Yukon; Kaskawulsh Glacier, Yukon; Kluane Glacier, Yukon


Ice cored moraine formation and degradation, Donjek Glacier, Yukon Territory, Canada   /   Johnson, P.G.
(Geografiska annaler. Series A, Physical geography, v. 53A, no. 3/4, 1971, p. 198-202, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 71248.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/520789
Libraries: ACU

The ice core of moraines at the terminus of the Donjek glacier is primarily composed of glacier ice and not snow bank ice. The widespread occurrence of these ice cored moraines in the area is the result of two main processes, one a shear-push mechanism of buried stagnant ice and the other due to ablation and fluvial deposits accumulating on a stagnant ice wedge being pushed in front of the presently surging glacier. Degradation of these moraines is due to five main processes, all of which are directly related to the occurrence of the ice core. (Au)

F, A, B
Ablation; Bottom sediments; Cores; Deglaciation; Drainage; Flow; Glacial deposits; Glacial landforms; Glacial melt waters; Glaciation; Glacier ice; Glacier lakes; Glacier surges; Glacier variations; Glaciers; Heat transmission; Ice erosion; Mass balance; Mass wasting; Melting; Moraines; Rock glaciers; Sediment transport; Sedimentation; Slopes; Solar radiation; Thaw flow slides; Valleys

G0811
Donjek Glacier, Yukon


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