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The ASTIS database cites the following 13 publication(s) by Martha Johnson. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


What is the fate of mercury entering the Arctic environment?   /   Douglas, T. [Coordinating author]   Amyot, M.   Barkay, T.   Berg, T.   Chételat, J.   Constant, P.   Dommergue, A.   Evans, M.   Ferrari, C.   Gantner, K.   Johnson, M.   Kirk, J.   Kroer, N.   LaRose, C.   Lean, D.   Loseto, L.   Macdonald, R.   Muir, D.   Gissel Nielsen, T.   Outridge, P.   Poulain, A.   Poissant, L.   Rognerud, S.   Skov, H.   Sørensen, S.   Wang, F.   Zdanowicz, C.
In: AMAP assessment 2011 : mercury in the Arctic. - Oslo, Norway : Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, 2011, ch. 3, p. 43-65, ill., map
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 75529.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.amap.no/documents/index.cfm?action=getfile&dirsub=%2FMercury%202011%20-%20Chapter%20Files&filename=C3.pdf

Introduction: This chapter focuses on the environmental fate of mercury (Hg), that is, the movements, transformations and bioaccumulation of Hg following its entry into the Arctic surface environment via the oceanic, atmospheric and terrestrial pathways described in Chapter 2. The chapter emphasizes those processes that are most relevant to biological Hg uptake and the consequent development of risk from Hg exposure in wildlife and human health, which will be explored in Chapters 5, 6, and 8. The chapter begins with a discussion of the chemical transformations of net deposited atmospheric Hg in aquatic and terrestrial environments and their associated snow and ice (Section 3.2). This is followed by a discussion of the movement of Hg from the abiotic environment into food webs (Section 3.3). Methylation, a key process controlling the fate of Hg in most ecosystems, is the focus of Section 3.4 while Section 3.5 addresses how trophic processes control Hg in higher order animals. Case studies on Eastern Beaufort Sea beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) and landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) provide salient examples of the relationship between ecosystem trophic processes and biological Hg levels. Section 3.6 explores whether atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) contribute to increased Hg levels in Arctic biota. The effects of organic carbon on Hg speciation, dynamics, and bioavailability are explored in Section 3.7. Finally, Section 3.8 focuses on long-term sequestration of Hg into non-biological archives. ... (Au)

E, J, D, F, C, I, H, G, B
Algae; Animal health; Arctic char; Arctic cod; Atmospheric chemistry; Atmospheric circulation; Bacteria; Beluga whales; Benthos; Bioaccumulation; Biological sampling; Biomagnification; Bottom sediments; Breakup; Bromine; Cannibalism; Carbon cycling; Climate change; Coast changes; Continental shelves; Copepoda; Effects of climate on ice; Environmental impacts; Erosion; Fishes; Food chain; Fresh-water ecology; Geochemistry; Glaciers; Hydrology; Ice cover; Lake ice; Marine ecology; Marine mammals; Mass balance; Mathematical models; Melting; Mercury; Metabolism; Microbial ecology; Ocean temperature; Ocean-atmosphere interaction; Oceanography; Permafrost; Pollution ; Precipitation (Meteorology); Primary production (Biology); River discharges; Runoff; Sea ice; Sea ice ecology; Seasonal variations; Sedimentation; Snowmelt; Solar radiation; Spatial distribution; Temporal variations; Thawing; Toxicity; Trophic levels; Water masses

G02, G03, G07, G06, G081, G04, G05, G11, G0814, G10
Alaska; Amituk Lake, Nunavut; Arctic Ocean; Arctic regions; Arctic waters; Baffin Bay-Davis Strait; Canadian Arctic; Canadian Arctic Islands waters; Canadian Beaufort Sea; Chukchi Sea; Greenland; Hudson Bay; Labrador Sea; Mackenzie River, N.W.T.; North Atlantic Ocean; North Pacific Ocean; Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard


An integrated international approach to Arctic Ocean observations for society (a legacy of the International Polar Year) : community white paper   /   Calder, J.   Proshutinsky, A.   Carmack, E.   Ashik, I.   Loeng, H.   Key, J.   McCammon, M.   Melling, H.   Perovich, D.   Eicken, H.   Johnson, M.   Rigor, I.
(Proceedings of OceanOBs'09 : sustained ocean observations and information for society (vol. 2), Venice, Italy, 21-25 September 2009 / Edited by J. Hall, D.E. Harrison and D. Stammer. ESA publication, WRR-306, 2010, [13] p., ill., maps)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
This PDF file was obtained from OceanObs'09 Open review (community white papers for the OceanObs'09 conference), prior to the online availability of the proceedings.
Alternate proceedings title: OceanObs'09 : ocean information for society : sustaining the benefits, realizing the potential, 21-25 September 2009, Venice, Italy.
ASTIS record 71979.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.oceanobs09.net/blog/?p=65
Web: http://seaice.alaska.edu/gi/publications/eicken/09CPCA.pdf
Web: https://abstracts.congrex.com/scripts/jmevent/abstracts/FCXNL-09A02a-1661760-1-cwp2a01.pdf
Web: doi:10.5270/OceanObs09.cwp.14

Introduction, Scope, Purpose: This White Paper takes a broad pan-Arctic approach to describe a plan for sustained ocean observations in the Arctic region directed to providing societal benefits, focusing on fulfilling the ocean component of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) in the Arctic region, while serving other needs as well. It will describe the most important in-situ platforms and address associated modeling and analysis activities. The paper starts with a description of the in-situ Arctic Observing Network System required for ocean physics, ocean biology and biogeochemistry, sea ice, and the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean. We discuss remote sensing techniques for the Arctic, and then discuss issues regarding data management, organization and Exclusive Economic Zones. (Au)

D, G, E, J, R
Carbon cycling; Climate change; Costs; Data buoys; Databases; Effects monitoring; Environmental impacts; Ice cover; Information services; International Polar Year 2007-08; Management; Marine ecology; Maritime law; Mathematical models; Measurement; Ocean-atmosphere interaction; Oceanographic instruments; Oceanography; Remote sensing; Research organizations; Satellites; Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Ships; Spatial distribution; Temporal variations; Weather stations

G02, G03
Arctic Ocean; Arctic regions; Arctic waters


Alaskan waters 1 km gridded bathymetry based on ship soundings   /   Danielson, S.L.   Johnson, M.
In: Alaska Marine Science Symposium : book of abstracts for posters and presentations. - [Alaska : s.n.], 2008, [1] p.
Abstract of a poster presentation.
Conference held Jan. 20-23, 2008 in Anchorage, Alaska.
Indexed a PDF file available online.
ASTIS record 75454.
Languages: English
Web: http://doc.nprb.org/web/symposium/2008/Abstract%20Book%202008.pdf

We describe efforts to compile a 1-km digital elevation model (DEM) for Alaska waters based on ship soundings. Soundings are derived from numerous sources to create a gridded bathymetric data set over the region bounded by latitudes 45°N to 75°N and longitudes 130°E to 120°W. The grid spacing is 30 second latitude by 60 second longitude, or on average about 1 km. This project is motivated by problems encountered when employing available global gridded bathymetric DEMs, which are based on navigational chart contours or satellite gravimetrics. Accurate solutions of real-world oceanographic problems via numerical models, like solving for ocean tides in shallow regions, require precise knowledge of the bathymetry on a regular grid. The full grid contains 2.4×10**7 cells, of which 1.4×10**7 are ocean grid points. We have assembled approximately 3×10**7 soundings that occupy 1.5×10**6 unique grid cells. The ocean area covered by the soundings-based grid occupies 7.8×10**6 cells, of which 1.4×10**6 cells have at least one sounding. The sounding-based grid covers the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent embayments, US waters in the Bering Sea, and most of the continental shelf area of the Chukchi and Beaufort Sea US waters. To complete the grid, land grid cells and ocean regions with sparse data coverage are prescribed elevations from the GLOBE, GEBCO and IBCAO global DEMs. (Au)

E, D, J
Bathymetry; Sonar; Submarine topography

G07, G04, G061, G141
Alaska, Gulf of; Alaskan Beaufort Sea; Bering Sea; Canadian Beaufort Sea; Chukchi Sea; Laptevykh More; Vostochno-Sibirskoye More


Dene Kede : justice and medicine activities   /   Ryan, J.   Johnson, M.   Dogrib Divisional Board of Education [Sponsor]
[Hay River, N.W.T. : Dene Cultural Institute], 1994.
50 leaves ; 28 cm.
Cover title: Dene Kede : justice and medicine curriculum.
ASTIS record 36153.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The tapes and reports from the Dene Traditional Medicine Project [DMP] and the Dene Traditional Justice Project [DJP] have been released by the Lac La Martre elders for use in the Dogrib community schools. As well, the Ft. Good Hope Dene Traditional Environmental Knowledge [TEK] report has information that is relevant to many aspects of the Dene Kede curriculum. The elders want the children in these schools to listen to the tapes, to learn from them, to think about them. They also want Dogrib children to learn to respect the elders, their parents and themselves through learning their own ways. One way of learning is by listening to what the elders have to say. The tapes can provide listening experience but having elders come to the schools and tell their stories is another important way of learning. Students can also attend Dogrib gatherings and learn from the elders and leaders there too. Spending time with elders at home is yet another way to learn. Another way of learning is through field trips. ... These connections have potential healing possibilities which come from sharing, respectfulness and gift exchanges among people, animals and the land. It is these experiences which heal the mind, soul and body. It is to healing and laughter and such memorable experiences that the following activities are directed. The suggestions for activities are made in keeping with the Dene Kede Mission Statements. (Au)

T, R, K, S, A, H, I, N
Biology; Culture (Anthropology); Curricula; Customary law; Customs; Dogrib Indians; Dogrib language; Education; Elders; Gender differences; Geography; Health care; Land use; Oral history; Participatory action research; Religion; Social interaction; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality; Trapping

G0812
Fort Good Hope, N.W.T.; Wha Ti, N.W.T.


Traditional Dene medicine, part two : database   /   Rabesca, M.A. [Researcher]   Romie, D. [Researcher]   Johnson, M. [Project Director]   Ryan, J. [Principal Investigator]   Canada. National Health Research and Development Program [Sponsor]   Dene Cultural Institute (Hay River, N.W.T.) [Sponsor]   Arctic Institute of North America [Sponsor]   Lac la Martre Band [Sponsor]
[S.l. : s.n.], 1993.
374 p. ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 33671.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The goal of the medicine project was to find out how much traditional knowledge about the use and preparation of plants and animal parts for healing remained in the community and to find out if, and how, people are using these ways for healing now. Another goal was to write down the information gathered in interviews with elders in a way which could be useful to community members who wanted to learn about natural and spiritual healing. The elders felt that this knowledge would be taught to the younger people so that they would be safe and would know what to do if they became ill or were hurt while out in the bush. The printed database contains nearly four hundred pages of descriptions by elders of how the plants and animal parts were prepared, how they were used and by whom. The information is divided into sections on medicinal healing, spiritual healing and surgical procedures. There is also additional information on situations which require the services of people with a "special gift", for example, during a difficult delivery, in the event of a major injury or when a person was suffering from "bad" medicine. The database allows a user to ask the computer to list all the conditions which are helped by a specific plant or animal part. If a user wants to know who said something about "tamarack" in their interviews, the computer will show the names of the people who mentioned it and each cure, the day they were interviewed and what they said about "tamarack" in the interview. It will also list the Dogrib names of the tree parts and the Latin scientific name. This volume contains the following sections: medicinal healing; plant, root, tree, berries used for healing; healing plant combinations; animals, birds and fish used for healing; medical conditions and ways of healing; surgical procedures; women's health; gift exchanges and offerings; collecting medicine plants; causes of illness; maintaining good health; miscellaneous information. (ASTIS)

T, K, H, I
Birds; Black bears; Caribou; Customs; Diseases; Dogrib Indians; Elders; Ethnobotany; Fishes; Fungi; Furbearing animals; Health care; Medicines; Mental health and well-being; Mosses; Plants (Biology); Rites and ceremonies; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality; Women

G0812
Wha Ti region, N.W.T.


Traditional Dene Medicine Project, Lac la Martre = le projet sur la médicine traditionnelle Dénée à Lac-la-Martre   /   Johnson, M. [Project Director]   Rabesca, M.A.   Romie, D.
(Northline, v. 13, no. 3, Oct. 1993, p. 10)
Abstract only.
Presented at the Human Dimensions of Northern Research Conference, Arctic College, Fort Smith, N.W.T., 2 Oct. 1993.
ASTIS record 33195.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

In 1992, the community of Lac La Martre began a research project on Traditional Dene Medicine. There has been very little research done on the use of plants and animal parts for healing. A stated goal of Dene self-determination and responsibility for one's own health and well-being, is related to regaining control of Dene lands and the return to both spiritual and physical land-based medicine. The project's goals are to: 1) collect, identify, photograph and preserve all plant and animal parts used for Dogrib healing and maintenance of well-being; 2) to document their preparation and form for use; 3) to interview elders about their uses and the context in which they are used; 4) to catalogue them for use by others after regional Dogrib consultation. (Au)

T, K, H, I
Animals; Dogrib Indians; Elders; Ethnobotany; Health care; Medicines; Native land claims; Participatory action research; Research; Self-determination; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Wha Ti, N.W.T.


Participatory Action Research Workshop = Atelier de recherche-action participative   /   Rabesca, M.A.   Romie, D.   Blackduck, R.   Zoe, S.   Legat, A.   Johnson, M.   Ryan, J.
(Northline, v. 13, no. 3, Oct. 1993, p. 9)
Abstract only.
Presented at the Human Dimensions of Northern Research Conference, Arctic College, Fort Smith, N.W.T., 2 Oct. 1993.
ASTIS record 33193.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

The emphasis of the workshop will be on the importance of evolving research methods which include local people, their training, and the ultimate goal of PAR is to leave sufficient expertize in the community to carry out any further research wanted. PAR principles include the need for the community to have and retain control over the project from its start, the establishment of a local advisory committee to oversee the project, sharing of power and making decisions by consensus, constant feedback on progress and results to the larger community, the verification of findings at a regional level and consensus on any recommendations. Our research projects have been joint ventures between the local Band Council, who initiates the research, Arctic Institute and Dene Cultural Institute who facilitate setting up the projects, finding funding and PIs and PDs. The workshop will allow for some small group discussions and simulated decision-making. Come and explore some new ideas and meet our very accomplished Dogrib researchers. (Au)

T
Dogrib Indians; Participatory action research; Public participation; Research; Traditional knowledge

G0812
N.W.T.


Traditional Dene environmental knowledge : A pilot project conducted in Ft. Good Hope and Colville Lake N.W.T., 1989-1993   /   Johnson, M.   Ruttan, R.A.   Dene Cultural Institute (Hay River, N.W.T.) [Sponsor]
Hay River, N.W.T. : Dene Cultural Institute, [1993].
vii, 309 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 32800.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... the Dene Cultural Institute decided to begin its research with a pilot project to take place in a representative community before expanding the research into other Denendeh communities. ... The pilot project began in August, 1989 and continued intermittently through April 1992. The long term goals of the Dene Cultural Institute's traditional environmental knowledge research are twofold; first, to document the knowledge of surviving elders for the purpose of cultural preservation and use by younger Dene and second, to promote the integration of traditional environmental knowledge with Western science for future resource management. ... This report describes and evaluates the pilot project and makes recommendations for future research. ... The main purpose of the pilot project was to develop a research methodology, and secondly to assess the surviving traditional environmental knowledge in the region. ... (Au)

T, H, I, J, V
Anti-harvesting; Beavers; Caribou; Dene Indians; Ecology; Elders; Ethics; Fur trade; History; Hunting; Martens; Moose; Oral history; Research; Traditional knowledge; Trapping; Wildlife management

G0812
Colville Lake region, N.W.T.; Fort Good Hope, N.W.T.


Dene traditional knowledge   /   Johnson, M.
(Indigenous knowledge. Northern perspectives, v. 20, no. 1, Summer 1992, p. 3-5)
ASTIS record 33446.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

For thousands of years, indigenous peoples around the world have utilized the natural resources of their local environments in an ecologically sustainable manner. Only in the past decade has this traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) been recognized among the western scientific community for its value to contemporary environmental management. Today, a growing body of literature attests not only to the presence of a vast reservoir of information regarding plant and animal behaviour, but also to the existence of effective systems of self-management of natural resources. ... The Dene Cultural Institute Pilot Project is one example of a participatory community project designed to document the traditional environmental knowledge of the people of Fort Good Hope and Colville Lake. For the past two years, a team of local researchers, a biologist, and an anthropologist have been developing methods to document TEK. The ultimate goal of the research is to integrate TEK and western science for the purpose of community-based natural resource management. The pilot project has only begun to uncover the wealth of ecological information available and to understand the traditional system that governs Dene use of natural resources. However, these preliminary results do reveal important similarities and differences between Dene TEK and western science. They also identify some of the problems of trying to integrate the two knowledge systems. ... (Au)

T, I, J
Acculturation; Co-management; Culture (Anthropology); Dene Indians; Participatory action research; Science; Self-determination; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality; Wildlife management

G0812
Colville Lake (Settlement), N.W.T.; Fort Good Hope, N.W.T.


Traditional environmental knowledge of the Dene : a pilot project   /   Johnson, M.   Ruttan, R.A.
In: Lore : Capturing traditional environmental knowledge / Edited by Martha Johnson. - Hay River, N.W.T. : Dene Cultural Institute ; Ottawa : International Development Research Centre, 1992, p. 35-68, maps
References.
ASTIS record 32805.
Languages: English

...The documentation of Dene traditional environmental knowledge is a formidable undertaking given the extent of that knowledge, the vast area that must be covered, and the different languages and cultures involved. In addition to these obstacles, there have been few precedents set to document traditional knowledge using a participatory community approach to research. With so little experience to draw upon, the Dene Cultural Institute decided to begin its research with a 1-year pilot project to take place in a representative community before expanding the research into other Denendeh communities. Fort Hood Hope (Radeli Ko), located along the Mackenzie River in the North Slavey region, was chosen for the pilot project. The neighbouring community of Colville Lake (K'ahabamitue), which has strong kinship ties to Fort Good Hope, was also included in the study. The pilot project began in August 1989 and continued intermittently through 1991. Its purpose was twofold: first, to develop a participatory action research methodology to document TEK and, second, to gain an understanding of environmental knowledge still possessed by Dene and how this knowledge has been used to govern their use of the land and its resources. This paper describes and evaluates the methodology that was developed and tested and provides a brief overview of the results. ... (Au)

T
Dene Indians; Ecology; Participatory action research; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Colville Lake (Settlement), N.W.T.; Fort Good Hope, N.W.T.


The workshop : purpose and results   /   Johnson, M.
In: Lore : Capturing traditional environmental knowledge / Edited by Martha Johnson. - Hay River, N.W.T. : Dene Cultural Institute ; Ottawa : International Development Research Centre, 1992, p. 23-31, ill.
ASTIS record 32804.
Languages: English

...The workshop was the first of its kind to bring together aboriginal and nonaboriginal researchers from around the world in a unique cultural setting. ... The workshop was organized around the case studies presented by each group. [These cases studies included: the DCI Pilot Project, the Belcher Islands project, the Marovo Lagoon Project, the Sahel oral history project, the Highlanders of northern Thailand, and two other, less formal presentations.] In most instances, presentations were jointly made by collaborating aboriginal and nonaboriginal researchers. In the case of the Dene project, elders who had participated as advisors on the project also spoke, giving those present a real taste of the traditional Dene view of the world. ... (Au)

T
Ecology; Elders; Research; Science; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Fort Good Hope, N.W.T.


Research on traditional environmental knowledge : its development and its role   /   Johnson, M.
In: Lore : Capturing traditional environmental knowledge / Edited by Martha Johnson. - Hay River, N.W.T. : Dene Cultural Institute ; Ottawa : International Development Research Centre, 1992, p. 3-22
References.
ASTIS record 32803.
Languages: English

For thousands of years, aboriginal peoples around the world have used knowledge of their local environment to sustain themselves and to maintain their cultural identity. Only in the past decade, however, has this knowledge been recognized by the Western scientific community as a valuable source of ecological information. Today, a growing body of literature attests not only to the presence of a vast reservoir of information regarding plant and animal behaviour but also to the existence of effective indigenous strategies for ensuring the sustainable use of local natural resources. ... This book presents the results of a workshop on the documentation and application of traditional environmental knowledge through community-based research. ... This book examines the process of collecting traditional environmental knowledge while using a "participatory action" or "community-based" approach. It looks at the problems associated with documenting traditional knowledge - problems that are shared by researchers around the world - and it explores some of the means by which traditional knowledge can be integrated with Western science to improve methods of natural resource management. ... (Au)

T
Animal behaviour; Ecology; Ethnobotany; Participatory action research; Science; Subsistence; Sustainable economic development; Traditional knowledge

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


Co-management of renewable resources in Denedeh : potentials and problems   /   Johnson, M.   Ruttan, R.A.
In: Common Property Conference : Second Annual Meeting of IASCP, September 26-29, 1991, Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada / International Association for the Study of Common Property. - Winnipeg, Canada : Natural Resources Institute, 1991, p. 36
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 33752.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The finite renewable resources of the Denedeh - the NWT region occupied by Dene - have been threatened or damaged in the past by over-use and alterations of environment. With rapidly expanding human population, threat of irrevocable damage or loss is greater than it has ever been. It is believed a new approach to resource management is required. Dene and other cultures who have been dependent upon land, foods and other renewable resources for generations, have been in conflict with modern resource management agencies over (government) policy that was at best ineffective or at worst in direct conflict with native traditions concerning care of resources or created hardship for resource users. It is increasingly obvious that future successful management or sustainable use of renewable resources in northern areas must involve greater cooperation and participation of aboriginal people. This can be accomplished by accepting validity of traditional environmental knowledge of the Dene and incorporating it in a co-management system where aboriginal people who are most dependent on resources, are primary partners. Past and current conditions associated with management of renewable resources of Denedeh, potentials and problems for effective co-management policy and appropriate guidelines are examined and discussed. (Au)

N, I, T
Co-management; Dene Indians; Government relations; Natural resource management; Science; Self-determination; Traditional knowledge; Wildlife management

G0812
N.W.T.


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