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The ASTIS database cites the following 5 publication(s) by Elmer Ghostkeeper. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Spirit gifting : the concept of spiritual exchange   /   Ghostkeeper, E.
Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America, 1996.
ix, 54 p. : ill. ; 22 x 29 cm.
ISBN 0-919034-83-7
References.
ASTIS record 38295.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... My reflections and recollections are presented as demonstrating two patterns. I describe two livelihoods and the respective worldviews that they reflect through their seasonal round of activities. Interwoven with my narrative are descriptions of their modes of production. The worldview described is my own. ... It is but one individual's interpretation of Metis cosmology, which I am willing to take the risk of presenting as written narrative. Thus, my insights may conflict with those of other members of the community. Chapter 2 narrates events of the year 1960. It begins with a description of the basic concepts of the local traditional worldview. A central concept is of a force referred to as "The Great Spirit." ... Metis view themselves as part of the land of living beings, and their relationships with other living beings include exchanging all their "aspects." Aspects of the spirit, mind, and emotion are thought to provide life for the body through the activities of ceremony, ritual, and sacrifice. These activities are referred to as "Spirit Gifting" when one makes a living with the land, using the gifts of plants and animals for food and medicinal purposes. ... The narrative describes a spiritual relationship created between the plants, animals and people, through the process of making a living with the land. Chapter 3 narrates events of the year 1976. The concept of mode of production is used to analyze a pattern of livelihood that comprised two modes: the construction of a natural gas field and grain farming (Asch, 1979). The technical and social relationships of these modes are described. The land, equipment, and labour, or forces of production, are more or less under the control of individuals from the community; the relationships, or means of production, are under the control of forces outside the community. Chapter 4 summarizes the dynamics and impact of making a living with the land versus making a living off the land. The comparison demonstrates and discusses the absence of spiritual relationships and "Spirit Gifting" between living beings and the land in the second pattern of livelihood. ... (Au)

T, R
Anthropology; Biographies; Culture (Anthropology); Customs; Employment; Ghostkeeper, Elmer, 1947-; History; Land; Metis; Psychology; Rites and ceremonies; Social conditions; Subsistence; Sustainable economic development; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality

G0822
Alberta, Northern; Paddle Prairie, Alberta


A local traditional ecological knowledge concept of "spiritual exchange" = L'«échange spirituel», un concept traditionnel local d'écologie   /   Ghostkeeper, E.
(Northline, v. 13, no. 3, Oct. 1993, p. 10)
Abstract only.
Presented at the Human Dimensions of Northern Research Conference, Arctic College, Fort Smith, N.W.T., 2 Oct. 1993.
ASTIS record 33197.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

This paper will be a brief overview of my thesis of the concept of "spiritual exchange". It will define the concept from a local traditional ecological knowledge point of view. The central questions that will be addressed in this exercise will be: how and why did the concept of "kichitawihitowina" or great gifts, used by the original Metis settlers and first generation Metis during the period 1939 to 1969, change its meaning from that used by the second and third generation Metis during the period 1970 to 1992, in the development of the Paddle Prairie Metis Settlement? Is this phenomenon a part of the dimensions of global change or only exclusive to the society of Paddle Prairie? The social organization of the two groups will be analyzed, using the social factors of economics, politics, culture, and social relations to study the concept of kichitawihitowina and what caused it to change its meaning and the effect that this change had on the development of Paddle Prairie. (Au)

T, J
Economic conditions; History; Metis; Social change; Social conditions; Social interaction; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality

G0822
Paddle Prairie, Alberta


Implementing the next economy in a unified context : A case study of the Paddle Prairie Mall Corporation   /   Robinson, M.P.   Ghostkeeper, E.
(Arctic, v. 41, no. 3, Sept. 1988, p. 173-182, ill.)
Abstract in English and French.
References.
ASTIS record 28557.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic41-3-173.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1716
Libraries: ACU

A recent paper entitled "Native and Local Economics: A Consideration of Economic Evolution and the Next Economy" (Robinson and Ghostkeeper, 1987:138-144) by the authors proposed a model for community-based native business development based upon the fusing of community culture with corporate culture in the information and service economy. This model has now been implemented by a Metis entrepreneur in the northern Alberta settlement of Paddle Prairie and is evaluated using the "unified approach" to economic development described by Higgins and Higgins (1979). In this way the new venture's performance is assessed against the following criteria: employment generation, income creation, contribution to regional ecological harmony and maximization of cultural enrichment. It is concluded that the Paddle Prairie Mall Corporation is a practical demonstration of the unified approach in Canada's mid-North and that the "Metis way of doing things," born of the bush economy, is an indigenous Canadian variant of the unified approach that acknowledges the importance of sociocultural and ecological factors in development planning. It remains to be seen whether or not the Metis way of doing things has an Inuit or Indian analogue and to what degree the next economy model can be equally well applied in non-Metis native communities. (Au)

R, T
Businesses; Community development; Economic conditions; Economic development; Metis; Native peoples; Paddle Prairie Mall Corporation; Psychology

G0822
Paddle Prairie, Alberta


Native and local economics : A consideration of economic evolution and the next economy   /   Robinson, M.P.   Ghostkeeper, E.
(Arctic, v. 40, no. 2, June 1987, p. 138-144, 1 ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 20815.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic40-2-138.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1758
Libraries: ACU

A growing body of social-scientific literature drawing on the experience of village-based northern bush economies demonstrates that adaptation to industrial economy entrepreneurial opportunities is both difficult and problematic. An analysis of the basic social and administrative structures of the bush, industrial and "next" economies (those focused on information and service) reveals that the bush economy has many shared structural parallels with the next economy and that this congruence can be exploited by members of the bush economy seeking next economy business opportunities. In particular it is noted that the bush economy household unit of production has strong affinities to the re-emergence of small businesses based on a family model, generalist skills, cooperative management, utilization of appropriate new technology, disintermediation and emphasis on the integration of work with the entrepreneur's cultural and personal values. A model is proposed for community-based share offerings and is developed to include community corporate culture, local employee training and the creation of new business opportunities. This model emphasizes the retention of locally generated capital in the community and its utilization for the start-up of a variety of businesses in the information and service sector. (Au)

T, R
Businesses; Co-management; Economic conditions; Industries; Native peoples; Subsistence

G082, G081
Canadian Arctic; Middle North


Native and local economics : a consideration of economic evolution and the next economy   /   Robinson, M.P.   Ghostkeeper, E.
Calgary, Alta. : M. Robinson and E. Ghostkeeper, 1986.
29 leaves ; 28 cm.
References.
Unpublished paper.
ASTIS record 18676.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the current trend of economic evolution away from the industrial economy to the next economy, sometimes referred to as the information and service economy, in the context of Native and local aspirations for community-based, sustainable development. ... A secondary purpose of this paper is to bring the analytical approach of the social scientist to bear on problems that are current and endemic in all small, northern communities, and that traditionally fall under the disciplines of accounting and administration. [Copy available from author, care of Arctic Institute of North America.]. (Au)

R, T
Businesses; Economic conditions; Native peoples; Sustainable economic development; Unemployed

G0822
Alberta


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