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The ASTIS database cites the following 14 publication(s) by Mark Dickerson. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


The impact of the traditional land use and occupancy study on the Dene Tha' First Nation   /   Horvath, S.   MacKinnon, L.   Dickerson, M.O.   Ross, M.M.
(Canadian journal of native studies, v. 22, no. 2, 2002, p. 361-398, maps)
References.
ASTIS record 55608.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This paper is an assessment of the Traditional Land Use and Occupancy Study (TLUOS) on the Dene Tha' First Nation in northern Alberta. Impacts of the study include: Identification of and greater protection of traditional Dene Tha' sites; enhanced traditional cultural values and increased traditional land uses, improved communication with industry and government; ail of which seemed to nurture a greater sense of community empowerment. These are positive impacts and they could be an important step in this First Nation achieving greater self-sufficiency. (Au)

T, N, Q, J, H, V, R, S
Communication; Culture (Anthropology); Employment; Environmental impacts; Ethnography; Forestry; Forests; Government relations; Heritage sites; Land use; Lumber industry; Maps; Occupational training; Oral history; Participatory action research; Petroleum industry; Self-determination; Social interaction; Social surveys; Socio-economic effects; South Slavey Indians; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy

G0822, G0821
Alberta, Northern; British Columbia, Northern


The impact of the traditional land use and occupancy study on the Dene Tha' First Nation   /   Horvath, S.   McKinnon, L.   Dickerson, M.O.   Ross, M.
Edmonton, Alta. : Sustainable Forest Management Network, 2001.
vi, 46 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Sustainable Forest Management Network project report, 2001- 18)
ISBN 1-55261-128-0
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 50229.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Extensive forestry and oil and gas development activities have been occurring on Dene Tha' traditional lands since the 1960s. Today, there are more oil and gas resource development activities on Dene Tha' traditional lands than any other area in Western Canada. The combined effects of these development activities continue to have significant effects on the Dene Tha' traditional way of life. Between 1995 and 1997, the Dene Tha' worked in partnership with the Arctic Institute of North America to conduct a Traditional Land Use and Occupancy Study (TLUOS) that would document their traditional way of life and traditional uses of the land. The results were published in a book in 1997, titled Dene Tha': Traditional Land Use and Occupancy Study. The purpose of this research is to examine the impacts of the Dene Tha' TLUOS on the Dene Tha' community. The research was conducted as a partnership project between the Arctic Institute of North America and the Dene Tha' community. It was funded by the Network of Centres of Excellence for Sustainable Forest Management. To identify the impacts of the TLUOS, researchers from the Arctic Institute worked with three Dene Tha' community members to develop an open-ended questionnaire, select community members to be interviewed, and conduct interviews in the Dene Tha' community. In total, 32 community members were interviewed: 12 elders who had been interviewed for the TLUOS; 4 community researchers who had worked on the TLUOS; 5 council members; 4 Band staff; 7 other community members. The Arctic Institute researchers then analyzed the interviews for common themes and responses. This outline presents a summary of the impacts identified by community members, along with selected quotes from the interviews and recommendations made by community members. ... (Au)

T, N, Q, J, H, V, R
Communication; Culture (Anthropology); Employment; Environmental impacts; Ethnography; Forestry; Forests; Government relations; Heritage sites; Land use; Lumber industry; Maps; Occupational training; Oral history; Participatory action research; Petroleum industry; Self-determination; Social interaction; Social surveys; Socio-economic effects; South Slavey Indians; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy

G0822, G0821
Alberta, Northern; British Columbia, Northern


The challenge of change   /   Dickerson, M.O.
(Arctic, v. 53, no. 2, June 2000, p. iii)
ASTIS record 46713.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic53-2-iii.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic840
Libraries: ACU

At their annual meeting on April 13, 2000, the Board of Directors of The Arctic Institute of North America bid farewell to Mike Robinson. ... The search for a new Executive Director has been successful. Karla Jessen Williamson has accepted the Directorship. She will begin her tenure on September 15, 2000. ... In a future issue of Arctic, Karla will tell us more about herself, her research, and her goals for the Arctic Institute of North America. ... In an era of significant social, economic, and political changes North of 60, she is well positioned to lead AINA in meeting research challenges not only in Canada's North, but in all circumpolar regions of the world. (Au)

R
Arctic Institute of North America; Research; Research organizations

G0822
Calgary, Alberta


Nunavut ("Our Land")   /   Dickerson, M.O.   McCullough, K.M.
(Information north, v. 19, no. 2, June 1993, p. 1-6, map, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 32694.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Legislation to ratify the Inuit land claim and to create Canada's third territory, Nunavut, has been introduced in the present session of Parliament. The following provides a brief historical account of the creation of Nunavut and basic information on the Agreement-in-Principle and the region. ... (Au)

R, T
Creation of Nunavut; Economic conditions; Government; History; Native land claims; Nunavut Land Claims Agreement

G0813
Nunavut


Commentary : A blueprint for change in the Northwest Territories?   /   Dickerson, M.O.
(Arctic, v. 45, no. 3, Sept. 1992, p. iii-iv)
ASTIS record 33734.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic45-3-iii.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1394
Libraries: ACU

September 1992 marks the 25th anniversary of moving the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) from Ottawa to Yellowknife. In that time, the growth of the territorial governmental process has been phenomenal. In 1967, most GNWT employees travelled in one plane going to Yellowknife, and the government's budget was about $14 million. Today, there are almost 6000 GNWT employees and the budget is over $1.1 billion. Strength at Two Levels (the Beatty Report) is certainly one of the more interesting and contentious reports commissioned by the GNWT. On the one hand it advocates expanding the powers of local governments in the region - hence, strength at the territorial and local levels of government. At the same time, if implemented, recommendations of the report would undermine part of the GNWT's power base in Yellowknife. The question then is: Will the report become a blueprint for change, or will it be just another document for decentralization, unheeded by Yellowknife? The Beatty Report is about the high cost of government in the Northwest Territories (NWT). ... The Beatty Report is not the only design for change on the table in the North. Since November 1991, the governing of their own lands by the Inuit would certainly necessitate restructuring northern government. In the western Northwest Territories the Commission for Constitutional development issued its report in April 1992, "Working Toward a Common Future." It posed the possibility of a new constitutional process for the new territory, emphasizing the necessity of beginning authority relationships with people and communities. Its design would certainly restructure the governmental process in the NWT. Thus the dominant view circulating in the NWT seems to be that change is required in northern government. Twenty-five years of evolution have created a centralized, cumbersome and expensive territorial government centred in Yellowknife. Many individuals and groups outside Yellowknife want a greater say in the policy-making process. A number of ideas exist about how the present system should be changed. The Beatty Report is one of those ideas, but one upon which the GNWT is relying heavily. Pressures on members of the Legislative Assembly may force the government to incorporate a number of views in its plans for restructuring. But the question remains, will the GNWT actually embark on a process of change, where communities or regions actually have greater decision-making powers? This may be difficult for a government that has built up a great deal of inertia over 25 years. (Au)

R
Civil servants; Costs; Government; Local government; Self-determination

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


Whose North? : Political change, political development, and self-government in the Northwest Territories   /   Dickerson, M.O.
Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America ; Vancouver, B.C. : UBC Press, 1992.
xvi, 233 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN 0-7748-0418-1
References.
ASTIS record 33225.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Residents of the Northwest Territories today face a number of difficult political issues: land claims, division of the territories, constitutional development, self-government, an accord for sharing resource revenues, and the establishment of their place within the Canadian federation. Whose North: provides the context for a better understanding of these issues, and it traces the evolution of an innovative, increasingly indigenous, governmental process. Today, eighteen of the twenty-four legislators are Native, and there is a non-partisan, consensus style of government that is unique in Canada. Mark Dickerson points out that within the NWT there is no unanimity on the nature of the system of government. He addresses the political tension between those advocating the continuation of a centralized government and those preferring a more decentralized form, particularly self-government, which many northerners view as the only way of preserving their culture. In many ways, the Northwest Territories is a test case of one of the most important social issues to be faced by Canadians in the twenty-first century. For Natives, it may determine whether they can indeed live in two cultures. Dickerson's depiction of the development of the territorial government and his discussion of the tension surrounding the choice of government will provide Canadians with an opportunity to begin to understand just what is at stake in this critical process. (Au)

R, T, V
Economic conditions; Elections; Government; History; Native land claims; Native peoples; Public participation; Self-determination; Social conditions

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


Sustainable development in small northern communities : a micro perspective   /   Dickerson, M.O.   Pretes, M.   Robinson, M.P.
In: Old pathways and new directions : towards a sustainable future : Proceedings from the Arctic Institute of North America's First Annual Kluane Lake Conference held at the Kluane Lake field station, the Yukon, in September 1989 / Edited by C. Robinson. - Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America, 1991, p. 114-136
References.
ASTIS record 31135.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Engineering sustainable economic development in small northern communities is a perplexing problem. Creating stable employment in communities far from the mainstream of Canada's economy seems to be a monumental challenge. Canada's North is a remote hinterland, with nearly 70 small (population less than 1000) communities stretching from the Alaska border to Baffin Island. Most communities are extremely isolated, with no access by road. Given these conditions, is it possible to create viable economies in Canada's northern communities, or are these communities destined to perpetual subsistence? Our view is that the situation is not impossible. We believe there is a chance to experience an economic turnaround if communities are given a greater resource base from which to work, a resource base over which they have control. Expansion of the resource base will occur if communities receive some of the benefits from pending claim settlements. Settlement funds will not cure all problems, but they are a step towards individuals having greater control of their own destiny, and towards greater economic autonomy in the communities. In this paper we take a micro approach to sustainable economic development. ... This paper, first assesses current conditions in small northern communities, examining statistics on employment, income, population growth rates, and the dependency syndrome. Second, we inventory existing jobs in an anonymous northern community, and speculate on potential jobs that could exist with a greater cash flow. Finally, we examine the potential use of claims settlement cash to see if these resources might provide ways of creating jobs in small northern communities. (Au)

R, T
Acculturation; Businesses; Economic conditions; Employment; Government relations; Native land claims; Native peoples; Natural resources; Population; Social conditions; Sustainable economic development; Wildlife management

G0812, G0811, G0813, G0826
James Bay region, Québec; N.W.T.; Nouveau-Québec; Nunavut; Yukon


Coping with the cash : a financial review of four northern land claims settlements with a view to maximizing economic opportunities from the next generation of claim settlements in the Northwest Territories   /   Arctic Institute of North America. Sustainable Development Research Group   Robinson, M.P.   Dickerson, M.O.   Van Camp, J.   Wuttunee, W.A.   Pretes, M.   Binder, L.N.   Northwest Territories. Legislative Assembly. Special Committee on the Northern Economy [Sponsor]
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : Culture & Communications, 1989.
x, 133 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
ISBN 0-7708-5819-8
References.
Summary in English and Inuktitut.
ASTIS record 29394.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... In this report the authors have gathered information on four settled land claims: the Alaska Native Claims Settlement (1971), the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (1975), which rolls two claims into one agreement, and the Inuvialuit Final Agreement (1984). In each of the above case studies we have attempted to present summaries of how the cash compensation was received, how the beneficiaries (the Native people who benefitted from each settlement) defined eligibility in their settlement, how governing structures were created, and how investments were made and economic activity was generated. We have also investigated problems associated with the chosen investment strategies and proposed ways for the next generation of beneficiaries to maximize their investment opportunities. In this way we have approached the Special Committee on the Northern Economy's request from the grassroots up. We think the best way to understand the impact of the settlement of land claims on the N.W.T.'s economy is first to understand the impact of different investment strategies on the beneficiaries themselves. By comparing the investment performance achieved by the four claims groups studies, we have set the stage for defining the optimum investment strategy for the Dene/Metis and Tungavik Federation of Nunavut beneficiaries. ... (Au)

R, T
Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, 1971; Community development; Economic conditions; Economic development; Economic policy; Employment; Inuvialuit Final Agreement, 1984; James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, 1975; Native development corporations; Native land claims; Native peoples; Standard of living

G0812, G07, G0811, G0815, G03, G06, G0813, G0826
Alaska; Inuvialuit Settlement Region waters, N.W.T./Yukon; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; Nouveau-Québec; Nunavut


Arctic profiles : second series   /   Dickerson, M.O.   Hills, L.V.
(Arctic, v. 41, no. 1, Mar. 1988, p. 71)
ASTIS record 49690.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic41-1-71.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1695
Libraries: ACU

In the June 1982 issue of Arctic, Richard Davis introduced "Arctic Profiles." At the time he said the purpose of the series was to cover "a more subjective and human element that has influenced the history of arctic development." He continued, "Should this series prove successful ..." more could follow. ... Because of the success of the Profiles, Arctic has decided to maintain the series and has asked us to see it through a second phase. ... The second series of profiles will be more contemporary but continue to recognize the contribution of those no longer active or alive. ... (Au)

V
Arctic Institute of North America; Biographies; Publishing

G081
Canadian Arctic


E.J. (Scotty) Gall   /   Dickerson, M.O.
(Arctic, v. 41, no. 2, June 1988, p. 156-157, ill.)
ASTIS record 32869.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic41-2-156.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1708
Libraries: ACU

The Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) had been in the North for centuries and continued to play a dominant role in the period following World War I. Scotty Gall, an 18-year-old growing up just outside Aberdeen, Scotland, decided there must be a greater future for him than working in a local foundry. So he applied for an apprenticeship with the HBC and came to Canada in 1923. This was the beginning of Gall's career in the North, which lasted until his retirement in 1966. ... Navigating the Northwest Passage in 1937 was a feat still unknown to most Canadians. The more publicized trip of the St. Roch, the RCMP ship, in 1942, is generally regarded as the first Canadian transit through the Passage. However, Scotty Gall piloted the HBC ship Aklavik through the Passage in the course of dropping supplies to HBC posts in 1937. He admits his trip was not publicized because individuals with the Bay at the time did not see that it was in their interest to publicize anything in the North. The trip of the Aklavik required a great deal of preparation at its home port of Cambridge Bay. The crew had to prepared, for example, to spend the winter away from home if caught in the ice. The big drop of trading goods on this trip in late 1937 was to be at Gjoa Haven on King William Island, and then the target was to transit the Northwest Passage - Bellot Strait, on this occasion - by 1 September, before freeze-up. ... The Aklavik was 60 feet (20 metres) in length and drew 6 feet (2 metres) of water. It was powered by a 35 hp Fairbanks-Morse engine. While it was not a particularly good freighter, carrying only 40-50 tons of cargo, it was considered an excellent vessel for the Arctic. A few years after the 1937 trip, the Aklavik caught fire and sank off Cambridge Bay. The voyage itself should be considered in context. It occurred before ships were equipped with radar. At the time, navigation was done by what Gall calls "instinct." ... Over the years his accomplishments have been a part of the history of the North. One of these accomplishments, his trip through the Northwest Passage in 1937, may be one of the best kept secrets in Canada. ... (Au)

V, L
Aklavik (Ship); Biographies; Expeditions; Explorers; Fur trade; Gall, Scotty, b. 1905?; History; Hudson's Bay Company; Marine transportation; Navigation

G0815, G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Northwest Passage; Nunavut


Antarctica under threat : an examination of the Antarctic Treaty system and its response to the challenges of the 1980s   /   Rothwell, D.R.   Dickerson, M.O. [Supervisor]
Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary, 1986.
x, 243 leaves ; 30 cm.
ISBN 0-315-36022-4
Thesis (M.A.) - University of Calgary, Dept. of Political Science, Calgary, Alta., 1986.
Bibliography: p. 234-243.
ASTIS record 34496.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The 1961 Antarctic Treaty is the basis of the Antarctic Treaty system in which 32 states have a role in administering the Antarctic. Eighteen of these states fully participate in Antarctic Treaty Consultative Party Meetings at which 'recommendations' are made dealing with man's activities on the continent. Seven states claim territorial sovereignty over 82 percent of the Antarctic, yet for the duration of the Antarctic Treaty these claims are 'frozen' by Article IV so that scientific cooperation can prosper without concern over territorial disputes. The Antarctic Treaty parties are presently attempting to negotiate an Antarctic minerals regime to regulate the exploration, exploitation and conservation of Antarctic non-renewable mineral resources. The negotiations have attracted world wide attention due to the concern over whether outside states will be granted access to Antarctic resources, the possible damage that resource development will cause to the fragile Antarctic environment, and the secretive approach of the Antarctic Treaty parties. This thesis reviews the current debate by considering the Antarctic's resource potential, the workings of the Antarctic Treaty system, the United Nations debates, implications of the 'common heritage of mankind' doctrine and the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, and the various proposals for a new Antarctic regime. It concludes by assessing the interests of all concerned parties and determining what will eventually emerge as the accepted regime for the Antarctic. (Au)

R, P
Antarctic treaties; Environmental impacts; Environmental law; Government; Land use law; Maritime law; Mining; Sovereignty; Theses

G15
Antarctic regions


Sharing information   /   Dickerson, M.O.
(Information north, 1986 [2] Fall, p. 11-12)
ASTIS record 19780.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

"... Like it or not, this northern one-third of Canada is becoming an integral part of the plans of superpower military strategists." While defence powers belong to Ottawa, control of information on defence powers matters need not be absolute. The author gives reasons why people in the north should be informed and consulted. (ASTIS)

R
Military policy; Sovereignty

G0812, G082, G0813
Canada; N.W.T.; Nunavut


The plebiscite on division of the Northwest Territories : regional government and federal policy   /   Abele, F.   Dickerson, M.O.
(Canadian public policy, v. 11, no. 1, Mar. 1986, p. 1-15, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 19752.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/3550376
Libraries: ACU

The much misinterpreted April, 1982 plebiscite in the Northwest Territories (re: partition of the Territories) is examined and used as a vehicle for analysing political problems in this important region of Canada. The authors contend that the plebiscite results, particularly in Inuit communities in the eastern Arctic, are consistent with broad goals of Native groups - namely, establishing government in smaller territories, preserving cultural identity, and generally assuming greater control of their own affairs. The federal government's response to the plebiscite, however, was to tell Native groups to resolve land and jurisdictional claims before talking division. Reconciling these positions is apt to make up a good part of the political agenda in the NWT in the immediate future. (Au)

R
Creation of Nunavut; Government relations; Local government; Native peoples; Tungavik Federation of Nunavut

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


Commentary : the Drury Report and political development in the N.W.T.   /   Dickerson, M.O.
(Arctic, v. 35, no. 4, Dec. 1982, p. 457-464)
References.
ASTIS record 10763.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic35-4-457.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2354
Libraries: ACU

The author's commentary on the Drury Report provides an interesting insight into the relationship of the people of the north and the federal government, as well as providing a useful critique on many aspects of the Report itself. (ASTIS)

R, T
Drury Report, 1980; Government; Government relations; Native land claims; Native peoples

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


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