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The ASTIS database cites the following 10 publication(s) by Margaret Bertulli. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Fort Conger : a site of Arctic history in the 21st century   /   Bertulli, M.M.   Dick, L.   Dawson, P.C.   Cousins, P.L.
(Arctic, v. 66, no. 3, Sept. 2013, p. 312-328, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 78237.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic66-3-312.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4310
Libraries: ACU

Fort Conger, located at Discovery Harbour in Lady Franklin Bay on northern Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, played an intrinsic role in several High Arctic expeditions between 1875 and 1935, particularly around 1900 - 10 during the height of the Race to the North Pole. Here are found the remains of historic voyages of exploration and discovery related to the 19th century expeditions of G.S. Nares and A.W. Greely, early 20th century expeditions of R.E. Peary, and forays by explorers, travelers, and government and military personnel. In the Peary era, Fort Conger's connection with indigenous people was amplified, as most of the expedition personnel who were based there were Inughuit from Greenland, and the survival strategies of the explorers were largely derived from Inughuit material cultural and environmental expertise. The complex of shelters at Fort Conger symbolizes an evolution from the rigid application of Western knowledge, as represented in the unsuitable prefabricated Greely expedition house designed in the United States, towards the pragmatic adaptation of Aboriginal knowledge represented in the Inughuit-influenced shelters that still stand today. Fort Conger currently faces various threats to its longevity: degradation of wooden structures through climate and weathering, bank erosion, visitation, and inorganic contamination. Its early history and links with Greenlandic Inughuit have suggested that the science of heritage preservation, along with management practices of monitoring, remediation of contamination, and 3D laser scanning, should be applied to maintain the site for future generations. (Au)

V, U, T, A, M
Archaeology; Artifacts; British Arctic Expedition, 1875-1876; Cairns; Cold weather performance; Design and construction; Effects monitoring; Expeditions; Exploration; Explorers; Forts; Greely, Adolphus Washington, 1844-1935; Heritage sites; History; Houses; Inuit; Lady Franklin Bay Expedition, 1881-1884; Laser remote sensing; Management; Nares, Sir George Strong, 1831-1915; Peary, Robert Edwin, 1856-1920; Reclamation; Shelters; Sleds ; Social interaction; Survival; Traditional knowledge; Weathering; Wood preservation

G0813, G10
Fort Conger, Nunavut; Greenland; Quttinirpaaq National Park, Nunavut


Application of 3D laser scanning to the preservation of Fort Conger, a historic polar research base on northern Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada   /   Dawson, P.C.   Bertulli, M.M.   Levy, R.   Tucker, C.   Dick, L.   Cousins, P.L.
(Arctic, v. 66, no. 2, June 2013, p. 147-158, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 77890.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic66-2-147.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4286
Libraries: ACU

Fort Conger, located in Quttinirpaaq National Park, Ellesmere Island, is a historic landmark of national and international significance. The site is associated with many important Arctic expeditions, including the ill-fated Lady Franklin Bay Expedition of the First International Polar Year and Robert Peary's attempts to claim the North Pole. Although situated in one of the most remote locations on earth, Fort Conger is currently at risk because of the effects of climate change, weather, wildlife, and human activity. In this paper, we show how 3D laser scanning was used to record cultural features rapidly and accurately despite the harsh conditions present at the site. We discuss how the future impacts of natural processes and human activities can be managed using 3D scanning data as a baseline, how conservation and restoration work can be planned from the resulting models, and how 3D models created from laser scanning data can be used to excite public interest in cultural stewardship and Arctic history. (Au)

U, E, J
Climate change; Electronic data processing; Environmental impacts; Expeditions; Forts; Heritage sites; Lasers; Photography

G0813
Fort Conger, Nunavut


Archaeological field work in the Northwest Territories, Canada, in 1997   /   Bertulli, M. [Editor]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, 1998.
iii, 48 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. Archaeology report, no. 19)
ISBN 0-7708-8793-7
ASTIS record 42540.
Languages: English and Inuktitut
Libraries: ACU

This publication contains brief summaries of the archaeological field work licences issued to researchers working in the N.W.T. and in Nunavut during 1997. (ASTIS)

U
Archaeology; Northwest Territories Archaeologists Permits; Research

G0812, G0813
N.W.T.; Nunavut


The final days of the Franklin expedition : new skeletal evidence   /   Keenleyside, A.   Bertulli, M.   Fricke, H.C.
(Arctic, v. 50, no. 1, Mar. 1997, p. 36-46, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 39921.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic50-1-36.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1089
Libraries: ACU

In 1992, a previously unrecorded site of Sir John Franklin's last expedition (1845-1848) was discovered on King William Island in the central Canadian Arctic. Artifacts recovered from the site included iron and copper nails, glass, a clay pipe fragment, pieces of fabric and shoe leather, buttons, and a scatter of wood fragments, possibly representing the remains of a lifeboat or sledge. Nearly 400 human bones and bone fragments, representing a minimum of 11 men, were also found at the site. A combination of artifactual and oxygen isotope evidence indicated a European origin for at least two of these individuals. Skeletal pathology included periostitis, osteoarthritis, dental caries, abscesses, antemortem tooth loss, and periodontal disease. Mass spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence revealed elevated lead levels consistent with previous measurements, further supporting the conclusion that lead poisoning contributed to the demise of the expedition. Cut marks on approximately one-quarter of the remains support 19th-century Inuit accounts of cannibalism among Franklin's crew. (Au)

V, U, T, K
Artifacts; Bones; Cannibalism; Diseases; Expeditions; Explorers; Food poisoning; Franklin, Sir John, 1786-1847; History; Inuit; Isotopes; Lead; Oral history; Search for Franklin; Traditional knowledge

G0813
King William Island, Nunavut


Excavations at PkHn-12 and PkHn-11, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, NWT, 1985   /   Bertulli, M.M.
[S.l.] : Northern Heritage Society, 1988.
20 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
References.
ASTIS record 45767.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... This work has been conducted by the Devon Island Archaeology Project under the direction of Dr. James Helmer, University of Calgary. The research objectives of this project are to acquire data which will contribute to a model of early Palaeo-Eskimo subsistence and settlement patterns, and material culture in the region. During the summer of 1984 and 1985, two sites on the north coast of Truelove Lowland were excavated under my direction as part of the curriculum of the Northern Heritage Research Project, an arctic science field school for native northerners operated by the Northern Heritage Society, Yellowknife, NWT. Information gained from these sites will contribute to the broad, theoretical questions of the Devon Island Archaeology Project. QkHn-12 and QkHn-11 are small sites, covering an area of only 4200 m² and 700 m², respectively. The former bears evidence of Pre-Dorset and Thule occupations while the latter is Pre-Dorset. When occupied prehistorically, the area was an emergent gravel beach; due to local conditions favourable to vegetation growth, much of the site area of QkHn-12, both Pre-Dorset and Thule localities, are now covered by fairly lush arctic plant growth and humic soils. Many features, such as Pre-Dorset tent rings, are only minimally visible on the surface and several totally buried features were located in the excavation of sampling units. Thirteen features on QkHn-12 and two on QkHn-11 have been delineated. The two sites are almost contiguous, separated by a low boulder outcrop and a shallow pond, the size of which has varied considerably in the two seasons of field work due to widely varying amounts of precipation. Despite the separate Borden numbers, the sites form a cultural unit and are not discussed separately. ... [Site features, methods, excavation and artifacts are described.] (Au)

U
Artifacts; Bones; Inuit archaeology; Mammals; Pre-Dorset culture; Thule culture

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Northern Heritage Research Project : an applied approach to research and education in the Northwest Territories   /   Bertulli, M.
(The North American Arctic = La région arctique de l'Amérique du Nord / Edited by Graeme S. Mount. Laurentian University review, v. 18, no. 1, Nov. 1985, p. 65-74)
References.
ASTIS record 46795.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Northwest Territories comprise almost three and one-half million square kilometres of Arctic and Subarctic lands north of the 60th degree of latitude. Within this isolated vastness are some 46,000 people, mostly Inuit, Dene and Metis .... This northern-most third of Canada is significant for its unique biota, biomes and cultures, from prehistory to the present, and no less for the stress to which all of these are now subjected by change. Rapid socio-economic development and research, imposed by southern interests and exigencies are prominent in contemporary life in the North. Until recently, scientific endeavours in the North consisted largely of brief forays by scholars from the southern institutions who had little contact with local communities during the research process. However, in the past few decades scientists working in the North, as elsewhere, have become increasingly sensitive to the social context in which they work. Northerners have assumed an active role in determining the scope and rate of development and research done in the north, as well as in performing research themselves. ... Training in the course of research is a demanding and time-consuming responsibility on the part of both the teacher and the student. The rewards can be great. (Au)

R, U, T
Archaeology; Arctic Research Establishment; Education; Licences; Makivik Corporation; Native peoples; Northern Heritage Research Project; Occupational training; Public participation; Research; Self-determination

G0812, G0813, G0826
N.W.T.; Nunavik, Québec; Nunavut


1985 annual report of the Northern Heritage Society   /   Parker, P.   Strahlendorf, P.   Johnson, M.C.   Post, C.   Bertulli, M.   Kense, F.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Northern Heritage Society, 1985.
70 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 45766.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Since 1979, the Northern Heritage Society has grown and evolved, each year adding or modifying programmes as experience is gained. One of the strengths of the Society is its ability to adapt quickly to changing circumstances and to proceed rapidly from the "dreams and aspirations" stage to delivery of concrete services and programmes. As in previous years, 1985 witnessed a number of innovations and changes. The NHRP field school expanded its curriculum for the second year in a row, adding geography to the archaeology and ecology programmes. The geography programme, under the direction of Christine Post, is described in Chapter IV. A counselling program for the NHRP participants, initiated by Paul Parker, was also established during the field season (Chapter V). A brief description of a study on Inuit folk-ornithology, conducted by one of the archaeology instructors at the field school, Martha Johnson, is provided in Chapter VII. In previous years, the Society published the results of field school research activities in its annual report. This year the results are obtained from the research components of the archaeology, ecology and geography programmes to be published separately in an annual research report. A single report was becoming unwieldly. For the first time the annual report is illustrated with photographs. (Au)

R, U, J, A
Archaeology; Curricula; Ecology; Education; Geography; Northern Heritage Society; Research; Research stations; Traditional knowledge; Water quality

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Northwest Territories archaeology field work in 1985   /   Bertulli, M. [Editor]
[Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre], 1985.
v, 32 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Archaeology reports of the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, no. 2)
ISBN 0-7708-4856-4
Cover page states number 2 1986; title page states number 2 1985, which is assumed to be correct.
Glossary.
ASTIS record 19552.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Some 6000 archaeological sites are scattered across the three and one-half million square kilometers of woodlands, barrengrounds and polar desert that constitute the Northwest Territories. This number probably represents only a fraction of the total number of places where early peoples chose to live as they travelled through this vast territory. Many of these sites, such as those in the Mackenzie Valley and Delta, are threatened by erosion or the activities of development; others in the remote barrengrounds or High Arctic are untouched, with stone tools lying where they were dropped hundreds or thousands of years ago. By excavating these sites and analyzing the materials recovered, archaeologists learn about the people who first inhabited these harsh yet wondrous lands and their ways of life which allowed them to survive and grow. From Devon Island and Roche Bay in the east to the Mackenzie Valley and Delta in the west in 1985, archaeologists have recorded the heritage of the Northwest Territories by excavating sites, searching for undiscovered ones, reconstructing houses of people long since gone, and learning how to make stone tools -- where a hunter's meal begins. Our knowledge of the human past in the Northwest Territories is richer for these efforts. (Au)

U, R
Archaeology; Artifacts; Dorset culture; Education; Heritage sites; Houses; Occupational training; Palaeoeskimo culture; Thule culture

G0812, G0813
Baffin Island, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; Mackenzie River region, N.W.T.; N.W.T.; Navy Board Inlet region, Nunavut; Nunavut; Roche Bay region, Nunavut; Somerset Island, Nunavut; Victoria Island, N.W.T./Nunavut


Northern Heritage Research Project = Programme de recherche sur le patrimoine du Nord   /   Bertulli, M.
(Inuktitut (English, Inuktitut and French ed.), no. 62, Winter 1985, p. 51-54, ill.)
ASTIS record 10903.
Languages: English, French and Inuktitut
Libraries: ACU

For one month each summer for the past seven years, young people from the Northwest Territories have been given a unique opportunity to participate in a scientific research and field school program which stresses the importance and preservation of the cultural and natural heritage of the North. It is called the Northern Heritage Research Project (NHRP). Participants study and assist scientists working on research projects in the disciplines of arctic archaeology, ecology and geography. ... (Au)

T, R
Archaeology; Northern Heritage Research Project; Northern Heritage Society; Occupational training; Research personnel

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Northern Heritage Research Project on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, High Arctic : annual report of the Northern Heritage Society, 1984   /   Bertulli, M.M.   Strahlendorf, P.W.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Northern Heritage Society, 1984.
vi, 103 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 45811.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The archaeological resources of the Lowland have been surveyed and tested over the past three field seasons by James Helmer, University of Calgary. He has stated three research objectives: i) the "changing seasonal subsistence/settlement strategies amongst the indigenous prehistoric populations of the Central Arctic archipelago" ...; ii) the "effect of Holocene climatic fluctuations on prehistoric cultural adaptations"; and iii) "the early Arctic Small Tool tradition (ASTt) and early Thule occupations of the High Arctic" .... The 1984 NCRP began excavation of a small but productive site, QkHn-12, on the north coast of the Lowland. The site has the potential to contribute data toward each of these three major study objectives. The responsibilities of site excavation, interpretations, and report production, as well as developing future research directions lie with the NHS, although the co-operation and assistance of Dr. Helmer are gratefully acknowledged. A preliminary analysis of the data recovered during the 1984 field season appears in this report. (Au)

R, U, J, A, H, E, I, T
Archaeology; Arctic Small Tool tradition; Birds; Curricula; Ecology; Education; Geography; Human ecology; Inuit languages; Microclimatology; Northern Heritage Society; Plants (Biology); Public relations; Research; Research stations; Thule culture; Traditional knowledge; Water quality; Zoology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


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