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The ASTIS database cites the following 20 publication(s) by Tom Andrews. Publications are listed from newest to oldest. Please tell us about publications that are not yet cited in ASTIS.


Ancient projectile weapons from ice patches in northwestern Canada : identification of resin and compound resin-ochre hafting adhesives   /   Helwig, K.   Monahan, V.   Poulin, J.   Andrews, T.D.
(Journal of archaeological science, v. 41, Jan. 2014, p. 655-665, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 81873.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1016/j.jas.2013.09.010
Libraries: ACU

This article describes a study of adhesive residues on 16 projectile weapons, 15 from ice patches in southwest Yukon and one from the Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories. The objects selected for analysis cover much of the Holocene, with radiocarbon dates from 8103 to 170 cal. yr. BP and represent both throwing-dart and bow-and-arrow technology. The goal of the study was to identify the residues associated with hafting and to determine if patterns of material use exist. The residues were analyzed using a combination of analytical techniques: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Hafting adhesive residues were found on nine objects that relate to throwing-dart technology and on two objects related to bow-and-arrow technology. In all cases where adhesive was found, the projectiles included chipped stone components. All adhesives, regardless of age, were found to be conifer resin, more specifically identified as spruce (Picea sp.). While the majority of adhesives were relatively pure, homogeneous spruce resin, in the case of three stone dart points, the spruce resin was intentionally mixed with red ochre to produce a compound adhesive. A fourth stone dart point showed the use of spruce "callus" resin, a type of resin produced during wound closure on the surface of the tree, which has a unique chemical signature. (Au)

U, V, B, F, H, J, E
Adhesive properties; Artifacts; Carving stone; Chemical properties; Chromatography; Climate change; Conifers; Dyeing; History; Ice patches; Indian archaeology; Mass spectrometry; Microscopes; Palaeoecology; Palaeontology; Radiocarbon dating; Recent epoch; Spectroscopy; Spruces

G0811, G0812
Big Salmon Range, Yukon; Kusawa Lake region, Yukon; Ruby Range, Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


Preservation of viral genomes in 700-y-old caribou feces from a Subarctic ice patch   /   Ng, T.F.F.   Chen, L.-F.   Zhou, Y.   Shapiro, B.   Stiller, M.   Heintzman, P.D.   Varsani, A.   Kondov, N.O.   Wong, W.   Deng, X.   Andrews, T.D.   Moorman, B.J.   Meulendyk, T.   MacKay, G.   Gilbertson, R.L.   Delwart, E.
(Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v.111, no. 28, 2014, p.10,077-10,082, ill., map)
References.
This article contains supporting information online at www.pnas.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10. 1073/pnas.1410429111/-/DCSupplemental.
ASTIS record 80511.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1073/pnas.1410429111
Libraries: ACU

Viruses preserved in ancient materials provide snapshots of past viral diversity and a means to trace viral evolution through time. Here, we use a metagenomics approach to identify filterable and nuclease-resistant nucleic acids preserved in 700-y-old caribou feces frozen in a permanent ice patch. We were able to recover and characterize two viruses in replicated experiments performed in two different laboratories: a small circular DNA viral genome (ancient caribou feces associated virus, or aCFV) and a partial RNA viral genome (Ancient Northwest Territories cripavirus, or aNCV). Phylogenetic analysis identifies aCFV as distantly related to the plant-infecting geminiviruses and the fungi-infecting Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1 and aNCV as within the insect-infecting Cripavirus genus. We hypothesize that these viruses originate from plant material ingested by caribou or from flying insects and that their preservation can be attributed to protection within viral capsids maintained at cold temperatures. To investigate the tropism of aCFV, we used the geminiviral reverse genetic system and introduced a multimeric clone into the laboratory model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Evidence for infectivity came from the detection of viral DNA in newly emerged leaves and the precise excision of the viral genome from the multimeric clones in inoculated leaves. Our findings indicate that viral genomes may in some circumstances be protected from degradation for centuries. (Au)

B, I, H, F
Animal food; Animal waste products; Biological sampling; Caribou; Genetics; Ice patches; Insects; Palaeontology; Plant diseases; Plants (Biology); Viruses

G0812
Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


A thousand years of lost hunting arrows : wood analysis of ice patch remains in northwestern Canada   /   Alix, C.   Hare, P.G.   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. 95-117, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 76349.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-95.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4187
Libraries: ACU

Discussions of the development of past hunting equipment generally focus on lithic and bone projectile points and foreshafts, as these are often the only elements remaining in archaeological sites. In the last 15 years, the archaeology of alpine ice patches has provided a unique opportunity to analyze hunting equipment over time and gain knowledge of the wooden elements on which the points are hafted. This paper describes the wood and morphometrical analysis of a collection of 27 arrow shafts from two ice patch regions of the western Canadian Subarctic. In both regions, two main categories of arrow shafts show the selection of specific pieces of wood, spruce (Picea sp.) on the one hand and birch (Betula sp.) on the other, with associated morphometrical characteristics. These shafts also share some characteristics that are distinct from those of Arctic and coastal arrow shafts. Shafts of pine (Pinus sp. sec. ponderosa) and hemlock (Tsuga sp.) were also identified in the southwestern Yukon Territory. The absence of correlation between the arrow shaft types and 14C dating raises the question of the significance of the arrow types and the potential for function, trade, or travel to explain the variation. (Au)

U, H, F, T, I, N, J
Alpine tundra ecology; Animal distribution; Animal waste products; Archaeology; Artifacts; Caribou; Conifers; Design and construction; Equipment and supplies; Ethnography; Fishing; Hunting; Ice patches; Mountains; Native peoples; Oral history; Plant distribution; Plant growth; Radiocarbon dating; Shrubs; Subsistence; Temporal variations; Testing; Traditional knowledge; Trapping; Trees

G0812, G0811, G06, G0821
Alaska, Southcentral; British Columbia, Northern; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Yukon


Ancient DNA reveals genetic continuity in mountain woodland caribou of the Mackenzie and Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Letts, B.   Fulton, T.L.   Stiller, M.   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.   Popko, R.   Shapiro, B.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. 80-94, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 76348.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-80.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4186
Libraries: ACU

We examine the mitochondrial genetic stability of mountain woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in the Mackenzie and Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, over the last 4000 years. Unlike caribou populations in the Yukon, populations in the Northwest Territories show no evidence for mitochondrial genetic turnover during that period, which indicates that they were not adversely affected by the widespread deposition of the White River tephra around 1200 years ago. We detect moderate genetic differentiation between mountain woodland and barren-ground caribou in both territories, lending support to the current subspecies designations. In addition, we identify moderate genetic differentiation between Northwest Territories and western Yukon mountain woodland caribou, suggesting that there has been minimal mixing of matrilines between these herds. (Au)

I, F, B, J
Alpine tundra ecology; Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal integumentary systems; Animal population; Animal waste products; Biological sampling; Bones; Caribou; Cores; Evolution (Biology); Ice patches; Palaeoecology; Palaeontology; Pyroclastics; Radiocarbon dating; Recent epoch; Seasonal variations; Temporal variations; Wildlife habitat

G0812, G0811, G06
Alaska; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


Diet and habitat of mountain woodland caribou inferred from dung preserved in 5000-year-old alpine ice in the Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Galloway, J.M.   Adamczewski, J.   Schock, D.M.   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.   Bowyer, M.E.   Meulendyk, T.   Moorman, B.J.   Kutz, S.J.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. 59-79, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 76347.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-59.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4185
Libraries: ACU

Alpine ice patches are unique repositories of cryogenically preserved archaeological artefacts and biological specimens. Recent melting of ice in the Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada, has exposed layers of dung accumulated during seasonal use of ice patches by mountain woodland caribou of the ancestral Redstone population over the past ca. 5250 years. Although attempts to isolate the DNA of known caribou parasites were unsuccessful, the dung has yielded numerous well-preserved and diverse plant remains and palynomorphs. Plant remains preserved in dung suggest that the ancestral Redstone caribou population foraged on a variety of lichens (30%), bryophytes and lycopods (26.7%), shrubs (21.6%), grasses (10.5%), sedges (7.8%), and forbs (3.4%) during summer use of alpine ice. Dung palynomorph assemblages depict a mosaic of plant communities growing in the caribou's summer habitat, including downslope boreal components and upslope floristically diverse herbaceous communities. Pollen and spore content of dung is only broadly similar to late Holocene assemblages preserved in lake sediments and peat in the study region, and differences are likely due to the influence of local vegetation and animal forage behaviour. The 5000-year legacy of summer use of alpine ice patches by mountain woodland caribou suggests that these small, long-lived features may be important for the health of caribou populations in the Selwyn/Mackenzie Mountain range. (Au)

I, H, F, B, J, E, U
Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal food; Animal waste products; Artifacts; Bones; Caribou; Climate change; Cores; Ice patches; Indian archaeology; Measurement; North Slavey Indians; Palaeobotany; Palaeoclimatology; Palaeoecology; Palynology; Parasites; Plant taxonomy; Plants (Biology); Radiocarbon dating; Recent epoch; Snow; Snowdrifts; Stratigraphy; Temporal variations; Wildlife habitat

G0812
Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


Morphology and development of ice patches in Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Meulendyk, T.   Moorman, B.J.   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. 43-58, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 76340.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-43.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4184
Libraries: ACU

Permanent ice patches in the western Canadian Subarctic have been recently identified as sources of cryogenically preserved artifacts and biological specimens. The formation, composition, and constancy of these ice patches have yet to be studied. As part of the Northwest Territories (NWT) Ice Patch Study, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and ice coring were used to examine the stratigraphy and internal structure of two ice patches. Results show the patches are composed of a core of distinct offset units, up to several metres thick, covered by a blanket of firn and snow. The interfaces between the units of ice are often demarcated by thin sections of frozen caribou dung and fine sediment. Radiocarbon dates of dung extracted from ice cores have revealed a long history for these perennial patches, up to 4400 years BP. Ice patch growth is discontinuous and occurs intermittently. Extensive time gaps exist between the units of ice, indicating that summers of catastrophic melt can interrupt extended periods of net accumulation. The results of this work not only display the character of ice patch development, but also indicate the significant role that ice patches can play in reconstructing the paleoenvironmental conditions of an area. (Au)

F, B, I, J, E
Ablation; Accumulation; Animal distribution; Animal waste products; Antennae; Caribou; Climate change; Coring; Crystals; Firn; Geomorphology; Ground penetrating radar; Ice patches; Mass balance; Measurement; Palaeoclimatology; Palaeoecology; Radiocarbon dating; Recent epoch; Snow; Snowdrifts; Temporal variations

G0812
Keele River region, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Tulita region, N.W.T.


Alpine ice patches and Shúhtagot'ine land use in the Mackenzie and Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.   Andrew, L.   Stephenson, W.   Barker, A.   Alix, C.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. 22-42, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 76339.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-22.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4183
Libraries: ACU

The NWT Ice Patch Study was developed in partnership with the Shúhtagot'ine residents of Tulita, Northwest Territories, Canada. This paper explores how Shúhtagot'ine traditional knowledge, collected through the direct participation of Elders in our archaeological fieldwork, science camps with Elders and youth, Elder interviews, and traditional land-use mapping, is informing our interpretation of archaeological data collected at alpine ice patches in the Selwyn Mountains. While knowledge of bow-and-arrow and snare technologies persists in Shúhtagot'ine culture, Shúhtagot'ine oral history does not contain detailed knowledge of throwing dart technology. Using data collected in our traditional land-use mapping project, we consider the role of ice patches in the broader context of Shúhtagot'ine land use. We propose that resource harvesting on high alpine plateaus and adjacent ice patches in the summer was more important in late precontact times than it was after contact. Shúhtagot'ine land-use practices involve long-distance travel in all seasons. Safe travel in the alpine landscape requires detailed knowledge of environmental conditions, such as snow and ice conditions, and respectful engagement with the spiritual entities inhabiting the landscape. (Au)

U, F, T, I, N, J, L, H
Alpine tundra ecology; Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal ecology; Animal waste products; Artifacts; Boats; Caribou; Elders; Equipment and supplies; Ethnography; Fur trade; Geographical names; Ground squirrels; Hunting; Ice patches; Indian archaeology; Land use; Mapping; Mountains; North Slavey Indians; Oral history; Participatory action research; Safety; Seasonal variations; Shrubs; Slavey language; Snow; Subsistence; Temporal variations; Traditional knowledge; Traditional native spirituality; Trails; Trapping; Youth

G0812
Keele River region, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Tulita region, N.W.T.


Archaeological investigations of alpine ice patches in the Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.   Andrew, L.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. 1-21, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 76337.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-1.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4182
Libraries: ACU

Inspired by the groundbreaking investigation of ice patch archaeology in Yukon Territory, the authors began exploring the Mackenzie, Selwyn, and Richardson Mountains for ice patch archaeological sites in 2000. Through remote sensing analysis, followed by intensive field surveys in the Selwyn and Mackenzie Mountains, we documented eight ice patch sites containing well-preserved archaeological artifacts and biological specimens. Twenty additional ice patches exhibit the key indicators of ice patch archaeological sites (permanent or intermittent ice and snow lenses containing caribou fecal matter, faunal material, or both), but so far these patches have not yielded artifacts. Collections from ice patches in the Selwyn Mountains include examples of three precontact hunting technologies: throwing dart (atlatl), bow-and-arrow, and snare. Atlatl technology, represented by the distal ends of two darts dating to 2410 and 2310 14C yr BP, predates bow-and-arrow technology, represented by two complete arrows, two distal shaft fragments, and a partial bow dating between 850 and 270 14C yr BP. A ground squirrel snare dates to 970 14C yr BP. Caribou dominates the faunal remains recovered from the ice patches. These data suggest that hunting on ice patches was part of a broader-spectrum summer subsistence economy focused on a broad alpine valley, known locally as K'atieh, and that hunters tended to target ice patches close to other subsistence locations in this area. (Au)

U, F, T, I, E, N, J, H
Aerial photography; Alpine tundra ecology; Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal ecology; Animal food; Animal tagging; Animal waste products; Artifacts; Caribou; Climate change; Cores; Effects of climate on ice; Equipment and supplies; Floods; Ground squirrels; Hunting; Ice patches; Indian archaeology; Land use; Mapping; Melting; North Slavey Indians; Palaeoecology; Radio tracking of animals; Radiocarbon dating; Remote sensing; Seasonal variations; Shrubs; Subsistence; Telemetry; Temporal variations; Trails; Trapping

G0812, G0811, G06
Alaska, Central; Fisherman Lake region, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Tsichu River region, N.W.T.


The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches : a global perspective   /   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.
(The archaeology and paleoecology of alpine ice patches. Arctic, v. 65, suppl. 1, 2012, p. iii-vi, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 76332.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic65-S-iii.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4181
Libraries: ACU

At a recent conference called Frozen Pasts, held in Trondheim, Norway, in October 2010, presentations by researchers from five continents addressed a broad sweep of human history and culture, including the archaeological remains of caribou or reindeer hunting preserved in ice patches in North America and Norway; stratified Paleo-Eskimo middens in Greenland permafrost; First World War archaeological remains melting from snow patches in the Italian Alps; the conservation of Scott's hut in Antarctica; permafrost burials of Iron Age Scythians in the Altai Mountains; and the discovery of Inca mummies in the Andes of Argentina. Linked only by their setting in the cryosphere, that part of the Earth's surface where water is frozen for at least part of the year in the form of snow, ice, or permafrost (Slaymaker and Kelly, 2007), the papers also served to catalogue the impact that global warming is having on archaeological remains. Permafrost, alpine snow patches, glaciers, and other components of the cryosphere are melting at alarming rates. The impact of these changes - altered regional climate patterns, rising sea levels, and catastrophic slope collapses from thawing permafrost, among others - are putting heritage resources at risk, requiring urgent action from archaeologists and other heritage specialists. By sharing their experiences at conferences like Frozen Pasts, archaeologists and other researchers are cataloguing these impacts while working to define a new sub-discipline: archaeology of the terrestrial cryosphere. It is in this spirit that we present this special supplement of the journal Arctic, which brings together 12 articles in the emerging field of alpine ice patch archaeology from North America and Europe. Linked by their association with either caribou or reindeer hunting or human travel in alpine environments, these articles provide a fascinating perspective on the cryogenically preserved artifacts and biological specimens being revealed by the melting of perennial snow and ice in high alpine settings. The first six papers present the findings of the Northwest Territories (NWT) Ice Patch Study, an International Polar Year (IPY) Project funded by the Government of Canada between 2006 and 2010. IPY is the largest-ever program of scientific research focused on the Arctic and Antarctic regions (Government of Canada, 2011), and its results are leading to significant advances in our understanding of the effects of climate change on the circumpolar world and its people. The Government of Canada's IPY Program envisioned an intense "pulse" of multidisciplinary research focused on two main themes: 1) climate change impacts and adaptation and 2) the health and well-being of northern Canadians. The research design advanced by the IPY Program encouraged partnerships across disciplines in order to investigate these themes in their full complexity. This approach is reflected in these papers, which explore the human, ecological, and physical dimensions of alpine ice patches in the Selwyn Mountains of the NWT. ... As the papers in this volume demonstrate, alpine ice patches can provide important baseline data on caribou population genetics and health that can be applied in future research and management. Further research is urgently required to understand ecological change and the resulting impact on heritage resources associated with these significant habitats. In conclusion, and as the papers here attest, alpine areas throughout the circumpolar North are experiencing melting at alarming rates. This rapid melting is affecting extant caribou and reindeer herds, while revealing new archaeological finds. Archaeological research has been initiated in several jurisdictions to document these changes, though in many others, work has yet to begin. As a group, the papers in this volume suggest that the phenomenon of ice patch hunting could exist anywhere where humans and caribou or reindeer interacted at some point in the past in an alpine environment; the northern Rockies, Torngats, Baffin Mountains, the Pyrenees, the Altai, and the Urals, among others, all seem like mountain environments with high potential. With this in mind, perhaps the greatest contribution this collection of papers has to offer is inspiration. (Au)

U, F, T, I, E, N, B, J, H
Alpine tundra ecology; Animal ecology; Animal food; Animal health; Animal population; Animal waste products; Archaeology; Artifacts; Caribou; Climate change; Cores; Effects of climate on ice; Elders; Hunting; Ice patches; Melting; Native peoples; North Slavey Indians; Palaeoecology; Palaeontology; Palynology; Plants (Biology); Prehistoric man; Radiocarbon dating; Reindeer husbandry; Remote sensing; Thaw flow slides; Traditional knowledge

G0812, G0811, G13, G0826, G0827, G06
Alaska; Canada; Europe; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Norway; Pyrenees Mountains, Spain; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Sibir', Russian Federation; Torngat Mountains, Labrador/Québec; United States


Morphology and development of ice patches in N.W.T., Canada   /   Meulendyk, T.   Moorman, B.J.   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.
In: Frozen pasts : 2nd International Glacial Archaeology Symposium, Trondheim, 5th-7th October 2010. - Trondheim, Norway : Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2010, [1] p.
Abstract of an oral presentation.
Indexed a PDF file available online.
ASTIS record 75391.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ntnu.no/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=c3e937ae-9b71-4323-aae3-733470c0ea4b&groupId=10244

Permanent ice patches in the western Canadian subarctic have been identified as sources of cryogenically preserved artifacts and biological specimens. Recent archaeological work in the Yukon and Northwest Territories has revealed evidence of hunting by humans on the alpine patches for thousands of years. The role of ice patches as use areas for wildlife and repositories for artifacts is due to their persistence on the landscape. However, the formation, composition and constancy of these features have yet to be studied. As part of the N.W.T. Ice Patch Study, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and ice coring were used to examine the stratigraphy and internal structure of two ice patches. Results show the patches are composed of a core of staggered, distinct units, up to several meters thick, covered by firn and snow. The contacts between the ice layers are often demarcated by thin sections of frozen caribou urine, dung, and sediment. A formation model developed using GPR data and Carbon-14 dates extracted from the ice cores revealed a long history for these perennial patches (up to 4400 years BP). Extensive time gaps exist between the units of ice indicating that although snow deposition occurs every winter it is often melted and many years can pass before an annual deposition is preserved. These ice patches have shown stability in a variable climate, as their preservation is strongly controlled by topography and wind direction. The results of this work not only reveal the character of ice patch development, but also indicate the palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic significance of the ice patches. (Au)

F, B, E, I, J
Animal waste products; Cores; Firn; Formation; Ground penetrating radar; Growth; Ice patches; Melting; Palaeoclimatology; Palaeoecology; Radiocarbon dating; Sediments (Geology); Size; Snow; Snow stratigraphy; Thickness; Topography; Winds

G0812
Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


Archaeological investigations of alpine ice patches in the Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.   Andrew, L.
In: Frozen pasts : 2nd International Glacial Archaeology Symposium, Trondheim, 5th-7th October 2010. - Trondheim, Norway : Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2010, [1] p.
Abstract of an oral presentation.
Indexed a PDF file available online.
ASTIS record 75390.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ntnu.no/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=c3e937ae-9b71-4323-aae3-733470c0ea4b&groupId=10244

Inspired by the ground-breaking investigation of ice patch archaeology in Yukon Territory, the authors began exploring the Mackenzie Mountains for ice patch archaeological sites in 2000. Remote sensing and air photo analysis, followed by intensive field surveys in the Selwyn and Mackenzie Mountains, resulted in the documentation of eight ice patch sites containing well-preserved archaeological artifacts and biological specimens. Twelve additional ice patches exhibit the key indicators of ice patch archaeological sites, i.e. permanent ice lenses containing caribou fecal matter and faunal material, but so far have not yielded artifacts. Collections from ice patches in the Selwyn Mountains include examples of three pre-contact weapon systems. Atlatl technology, represented by the distal ends of two darts dating to 2410 and 2310 BP, predates bow-and-arrow technology, which consists of two complete arrows, two distal shaft fragments and a partial bow dating between 850 and 270 BP. A ground squirrel snare dates to 970 BP. Caribou dominates the faunal remains recovered from the ice patches. These data are discussed in terms of their potential to illuminate the pre-contact culture history of the Selwyn and Mackenzie Mountains, particularly changes in hunting technologies and the organization of hunting technology in subarctic alpine subsistence-settlement systems. (Au)

U, T, F, B, I, J, N
Aerial photography; Animal ecology; Animal waste products; Artifacts; Bones; Caribou; Ground squirrels; Hunting; Ice patches; Indian archaeology; Palaeoecology; Palaeontology; Remote sensing; Subsistence; Trapping

G0812
Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Selwyn Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


Hunters of the alpine ice : the NWT Ice Patch Study   /   Andrews, T.D.   MacKay, G.   Andrew, L.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, 2009.
39 p. : ill., maps ; 28 x 33 cm.
ISBN 978-0-7708-0185-4
The NWT Ice Patch Study was a partnership between the Tulita Dene Band and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre between 2005 and 2009.
Not seen by ASTIS.
ASTIS record 69332.
Languages: English

Drawing on the expertise of archaeologists, Aboriginal elders, biologists, geologists and educators, the NWT Ice Patch Study is a collaborative effort to learn and share knowledge about the human and environmental history of the Northwest Territories by investigating permanent ice patches in the Mackenzie Mountains. More than mere lenses of ice, ice patches are frozen repositories of well-preserved archaeological artifacts and biological specimens. As illustrated in the pages of this book, truly exceptional archaeological artifacts are emerging from the ice as these features, which have persisted for nearly 5000 years, are increasingly under pressure from warming climates. The book is geared for high school students and contains sections on science camps held in the Mackenzie Mountains as well as material on Shuhtaot'ine (Mountain Dene) traditional knowledge and land use. (Au)

F, B, T, U, R, J, I, H, E
Animal ecology; Animal food; Animal health; Animal waste products; Artifacts; Caribou; Climate change; Cores; Education; Effects of climate on ice; Elders; Formation; Ground penetrating radar; Ice patches; Mammals; Melting; North Slavey Indians; Palaeobotany; Palaeoecology; Palaeontology; Palynology; Public participation; Radiocarbon dating; Research; Size; Traditional knowledge; Traditional land use and occupancy; Wildlife habitat; Youth

G0812
Keele River region, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon; Natla River region, N.W.T.; Tsichu River region, N.W.T.


Dè t'a hoti ts'eeda : we live securely by the land : an exhibition of Dene material selected from the collections from the National Museums Scotland   /   Tlicho First Nation   Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre   Andrews, T.D. [Editor and Curator]   University of Dundee. Visual Research Centre   Renwick, G.T. [Curator]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, 2006.
ii, 78 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN 0-7708-0149-8
Title appears only in Dogrib and English, although text appears in Dogrib, English and French.
Contents: Introduction / George Mackenzie - Forward / Henrietta Lidchi - Comment / Charles Arnold - Exhibition Catalogue: Exhibit Context / Tom Andrews & Gavin Renwick - The Dene in Edinburgh: a history of the National Museums of Scotland - Bernard Rogan Ross: a biography - Acknowledgements.
ASTIS record 61276.
Languages: Dogrib, English and French
Libraries: ACU

The Tlicho Government is a proud collaborator in the mounting of this travelling exhibit. With our partners, the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, the National Museums Scotland, and the Visual Research Centre at the University of Dundee, we have chosen nearly 40 objects from the collection of the National Musuems Scotland to display in the Northwest Territories, in Ottawa, and later in Edinburgh. Along the way, several objects will also visit our Tlicho communities to be used in school outreach programs, providing our youth with a direct link to their past. Though a large portion of the objects on display originated in Fort Rae and were made by Tlicho artisans, we have carefully chosen objects made by other Dene of the NWT to ensure that a wide range of material culture is on display. In this way the Tlicho Government also tried to ensure that all other NWT Dene groups are represented in the exhibit. These objects show everyday things that people needed to enjoy daily life in the NWT in the mid-nineteenth century. However, demonstrating that Dene culture is still vibrant, many of these objects are still being made by artisans in our communities today. Our elders are particularly interested in seeing these objects. A few have visited Edinburgh to see them in person, and a few more have seen photographs of the objects. Their comments have been summarized in the labels. For most, however, this will be the first time that they will have had a chance to see them. For these elders, seeing them will bring forth fond memories of youth, or of stories told by grandparents. Many will marvel at the decorative motif, so different from the floral patterns common today. All will be proud of the fact that their material culture is considered important and valued by museums around the world. For this reason we are grateful to our partners, particularly National Museums Scotland who have protected these objects for more than 150 years, for the opportunity to have them displayed in the north where our people can see them. (Au)

T, V
Adornment; Artifacts; Athapascan Indians; Catalogues; Dene Indians; Elders; Ethnographic collections; History; National Museums Scotland; Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre; Traditional clothing

G0812
Gamètì region, N.W.T.; N.W.T.; Scotland


Memory, culture and archaeology : the land in Dogrib oral tradition   /   Andrews, T.D.   Zoe, J.B.
In: Fifth National Students' Conference on Northern Studies, November 28-30, 1997, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia : conference proceedings = Cinquième conférence nationale des étudiants en études nordiques, du 28 au 30 novembre 1997, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver (C.-B.) : sommaire de la conférence / Edited by Margaret M. Squires. - Ottawa : Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies, 1998, p. 22-23
References.
ASTIS record 45411.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Idaa trail Heritage Resource Inventory Project, designed to complete a site inventory of the traditional trail linking Great Slave and Great Bear Lakes, involved many partners. Dogrib elders from the communities of Rae Lakes and Rae, Dogrib translators, the Rae/Edzo Friendship Centre, researchers from the Archaeology Program at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre and several funding agencies combined their resources, talents, and knowledge to carry out the project. ... Nearly 350 traditional Dogrib place names were documented over the three field seasons and a total of 282 archaeological sites were recorded. Lithic material was noted at over half of these sites (69 percent of sites where subsurface testing was undertaken). Forty burial locations were visited, representing 189 individual graves. Four abandoned villages, four lithic quarries, and nearly twenty sacred sites were recorded .... Providing more than access to harvesting areas, trails, named placed and their associated narratives present a record of land use over time, recording generations of experience with a cultural landscape. Traditional place names and trails are 'emic' categories in Dogrib culture. The are a focus of activity, stories and ritual and as such hold tremendous potential for ethnoarchaeological research. (Au)

T, U, S, A
Canoes; Culture (Anthropology); Design and construction; Dogrib Indians; Education; Elders; Geographical names; Indian archaeology; Land use; Oral history; Traditional knowledge; Trails

G0812
Edzo, N.W.T.; Gamètì, N.W.T.; Great Bear Lake region, N.W.T.; Great Slave Lake region, N.W.T.; Rae, N.W.T.


The Dogrib Birchbark Canoe Project   /   Andrews, T.D.   Zoe, J.B.
(Arctic, v. 51, no. 1, Mar. 1998, p. 75-81, ill., map)
References.
ASTIS record 42391.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic51-1-75.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1048
Libraries: ACU

The Dogrib are one of the Athapaskan, or Dene groups occupying the Mackenzie Valley area in the Northwest Territories (see map). Their hunting canoes, though engineered for traversing a rugged landscape, had elegant and flowing lines. ... Although there is a reasonably good collection of archival photographs of Dogrib canoes, mostly due to the efforts of the anthropologist J. Alden Mason ..., the historical record has preserved little knowledge pertinent to canoe construction and use, and only a small number of canoes have survived in museum collections. During our recent archaeological research on two important Dogrib canoe routes, however, we recorded the remains of nearly 30 hunting canoes .... Today, in the Dogrib communities of Snare Lake, Rae Lakes, Wha Ti and Rae-Edzo, the oral tradition is full of canoeing and canoe-related stories and remembrances, although very few surviving elders actually built one in their youth. This fact, and the large number of canoes recorded in our research, gave us a new appreciation of the importance and role they had played in travel, and led to an exciting cultural revival project: to build and document a Dogrib birchbark canoe. ... [This article briefly describes the canoe project, sharing some of what the elders taught us about Dogrib hunting canoes.] (Au)

T, L, H
Birches; Canoes; Design and construction; Dogrib Indians; Education; Elders; Oral history; Spruces; Traditional knowledge

G0812
Edzo, N.W.T.


Yamoria's arrows : stories, place-names and the land in Dene oral tradition   /   Andrews, T.D.   Parks Canada. National Historic Parks and Sites Branch [Sponsor]
[S.l. : National Historic Parks and Sites, Northern Initiatives, Parks Canada, 1990].
39 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.
indexed from a photocopy.
References.
ASTIS record 36159.
Languages: English

... This paper seeks to establish a framework for understanding the cultural landscape of the Dene and in doing so it will attempt to describe the basis of Dene ethnogeography. Key to this framework will be an examination of the role of place-names and narrative in recording the relationship between culture and land. It has been well documented that place-names often act as a medium for recording knowledge within an oral tradition .... As such, place-names commemorate more than landmarks. Through narrative associated with a place, they reflect aspects of culture which imbue the location with meaning inherent in the narrative. The paper will first briefly survey the role of place and narrative within several oral traditions that exhibit a rich association with the surrounding landscape. Secondly, it will examine the semantic rules for Dene place-naming which will lead into a discussion of the role that place-names play in historical narratives. Finally, it will examine the social context of this relationship in light of a personal travel narrative. (Au)

T, A, V
Culture (Anthropology); Customs; Dene Indians; Elders; Geographical names; Geography; Legends; Oral history; Psychology; Social interaction; Traditional knowledge

G0812
N.W.T.


Ida ["up this way"] : Dogrib traditional knowledge and heritage resource inventories in the Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Andrews, T.D.   Zoe, J.B.
[Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, 199-].
12 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
indexed from a photocopy.
References.
ASTIS record 36158.
Languages: English

Recent archaeological research conducted by the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre has concentrated largely on completing heritage resource inventories of various regions of the Northwest Territories for which the archaeological record is poorly understood. Collaborative research with local communities has proven to be an effective way for eliciting information pertinent to past use of these landscapes. This paper discusses initial results of a three-year inventory project conducted in collaboration with the communities of Rae Lakes and Rae. Dogrib traditions (oral narrative, subsistence strategies, and place names) related to a canoe and dog sled trail were used as a basis for determining field reconnaissance strategies. (Au)

T, L, A, V, S, N, U
Canoeing; Canoes; Caribou; Dogrib Indians; Dogsledding; Elders; Geographical names; Graves; Heritage sites; History; Hunting; Indian archaeology; Land use; Landslides; Mapping; Oral history; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge; Trails

G0812
Gamètì, N.W.T.; Rae, N.W.T.


Section VI : Denendeh (Western Arctic)   /   DeLancey, D.   Andrews, T.D.   International Co-ordinating Council of the Programme on Man and the Biosphere [Sponsor]
(Canada/MAB report, no. 21, 1989, p. 147-173, 1 map)
(Community-based resource management in Canada : an inventory of research and projects / Edited by Fay G. Cohen and Arthur J. Hanson. Canada/MAB report, no. 21, 1989, p. 147-173, 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 32893.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

To a great extent, the key resource issues in the Denendeh region stem from two major sources of conflicts between the needs of renewable and non-renewable resource sectors and conflicts between aboriginal and non-aboriginal users. Outside influences, such as the anti-trapping movement and an increasing military presence in the North, have also had significant impacts. ... Until fairly recently, resource management decisions were the exclusive domain of the federal government, represented by the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. ... Throughout the region, there is a growing recognition that local resource users not only have the right to be involved in management decisions, but have knowledge that can be invaluable to the management process. ... The territorial Department of Renewable Resources is increasingly willing to acknowledge the validity of local knowledge, and to involve local resource users in policy and planning. The newly incorporated Science Institute of the N.W.T. (see descriptive inventory) hosts an ongoing discussion group with representatives from several government departments and non-governmental agencies, on the topic of traditional knowledge and how it can be incorporated into the policy level of government. ... (Au)

T, N, R
Anti-harvesting; Co-management; Culture (Anthropology); Environmental impacts; Fisheries; Fishing; Government relations; Hunting; Land use; Native land claims; Native peoples; Petroleum industry; Planning; Public opinion; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Sustainable economic development; Traditional knowledge; Trapping; Wildlife management

G0812
N.W.T.


Selected bibliography of native resource management systems and native knowledge of the environment   /   Andrews, T.D.
(Traditional knowledge and renewable resource management in northern regions / Edited by M.M.R. Freeman and L.N. Carbyn. Occasional publication - Boreal Institute for Northern Studies. University of Alberta, 23, 1988, p. 105-124)
ASTIS record 29420.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... This bibliography presents a selective survey of the literature pertaining to Native traditional environmental knowledge and resource management. An attempt has been made to present a comprehensive listing for Canada (with the exception of studies in ethnobotany) and a listing representative of the widest possible range of research and issues for the rest of the world. (Au)

J, T
Bibliographies; Culture (Anthropology); Human ecology; Native peoples; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge; Wildlife management

G081, G08, G06, G13
Africa; Alaska; Asia; Australia; Canada; Canadian Arctic; Greenland; Scandinavia


Pathways to archaeology : Dene oral tradition, ethnogeography and the material record   /   Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre   Andrews, T.D.   Hanks, C.C.   Northwest Territories [Sponsor]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre ; Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta, Dene Mapping Project, 1987.
15 p. ; 28 cm.
(NOGAP project no. H.32 : Training northerners in archaeological techniques)
Paper presented at the 20th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Archaeological Association, Calgary, April 24, 1987.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NOGAP.
ASTIS record 29263.
Languages: English
Libraries: NWYGI OORD

Mountain Dene oral tradition and the distribution of archaeological features of the area of Drum Lake in the Mackenzie Mountain region of the N.W.T. are discussed. The report argues that local oral tradition, specifically that which relates to ethnogeography and the distribution and uses of trails, has important contributions to make to aspects of archaeological research. The authors conclude that archaeologists must reconsider standard sampling strategies and research design in light of the knowledge and experience of local informants. (NOGAP)

U
Dene Indians; Ethnology; Indian archaeology; Local history; Oral history; Public participation; Traditional knowledge; Trails

G0812
Mackenzie Mountains, N.W.T./Yukon


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