ASTIS - Arctic Science and Technology Information System


A search of the ASTIS database for "BI PEMT" has found the following 7 records, which are sorted in descending order of year.


The Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool : application of risk assessment tool and cumulative effects model for the Eastern Arctic and High Arctic study areas : final report   /   Nunami Stantec   Canada. Northern Oil and Gas [Sponsor]
Burnaby, B.C. : Nunami Stantec, 2012.
viii, 62, A-1 - A-3, B-1 - B-3, C-1 - C-3, D-1 - D-39, [4], [39] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file.
Appendix A: Risk analysis - Appendix B: Geomatics aspects and recommendations for improvement - Appendix C: High Arctic development scenario - Appendix D: Zones of influence and scope of potential effects - Appendix E: Eastern Arctic updated distribution data maps - Appendix F: Cumulative effects scenario results figures.
References.
Project no.: 1235-10432.
Report date: April 2012.
ASTIS record 74858 describes the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool for the High Arctic study area : 2011 update.
ASTIS record 76319.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/76319.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Executive Summary: To help guide development in the Canadian Arctic, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) developed the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). The online tool maps the sensitivities of a variety of arctic features, ranging from whales to traditional harvesting, across the Canadian Arctic. The tool is intended to aid government, oil and gas companies, Aboriginal groups, resource managers and public stakeholders in better understanding the geographic distribution of areas which are sensitive for environmental and socio-economic reasons. This document is an extension and application to the previous report 'The Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool: Risk-based analysis and cumulative effects scenarios for the Eastern Arctic' (Nunami Stantec Ltd. 2011b) (described in ASTIS record 74859). The original report explored two approaches to estimate the relative risk associated with the environmental effects of development activities; a risk based analysis of project effects, and cumulative effects scenarios. The preliminary risk based analysis and cumulative effects scenario model was developed using four Valued Components (VCs): bowhead whale, toothed whale, thick-billed murre, and commercial fisheries. This report presents results from an updated and more realistic cumulative effects scenario with updated distribution data for the original four Eastern Arctic VCs and applying the model to the remaining four VC's in the Eastern Arctic study area. Distribution data and associated sensitivity layers for all Eastern Arctic VC's were updated prior to running the model. The original four VCs included bowhead whale, toothed whale, thick-billed murre, and commercial turbot fisheries. The additional VCs considered for the Eastern Arctic study area include polar bear, Arctic char, walrus, and traditional harvest. Development scenarios were created for the High Arctic study area and the model was applied to five VCs: polar bear, narwhal, migratory birds, Peary caribou, and traditional harvest. The analysis provides an indication of relative risk of cumulative effects based on ecological, physical, political, or social thresholds for each VC. The results described in this document support earlier conclusions that the cumulative effects of development on VCs vary considerably. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, D, G, T, R, L
Air quality; Airplanes; Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal health; Animal migration; Animal mortality; Arctic char; Bird nesting; Birds; Bowhead whales; Caribou; Common Murres; Culture (Anthropology); Cumulative effects; Drilling mud disposal; Economic geology; Endangered species; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Fish spawning; Fishing; Greenland halibut; Helicopters; Hunting; Icebreakers; Inuit; Land use; Mapping; Marine mammals; Marine transportation; Mathematical models; Narwhals; Natural resource management; Noise; Offshore oil well drilling; Offshore seismic surveys; Parks; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum leases; Polar bears; Polynyas; Risk assessment; Sea birds; Sea ice ecology; Seasonal variations; Ships; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Thick-billed Murres; Walruses; Water pollution; Water treatment; Whales; Whaling; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G0813, G0815, G09, G10, G07, G0812
Baffin Bay-Davis Strait; Baffin Island waters, Nunavut; Canadian Arctic Islands; Canadian Arctic Islands waters; Canadian Beaufort Sea; Greenland; North Water Polynya, Baffin Bay; Parry Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Parry Islands, N.W.T./Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands, N.W.T./Nunavut


Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool : risk-based analysis and cumulative effects scenarios for the Eastern Arctic   /   Nunami Stantec   Canada. Northern Oil and Gas [Sponsor]
Burnaby, B.C. : Nunami Stantec, 2011.
viii, 43, [13], A-1 - A-5, B-1 - B-3, C-1 - C-12 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
Appendix A: Geomatics aspects of the cumulative effects model - Appendix B: Development scenario - Appendix C: Zones of influence and the scope of an effect.
References.
Project no.: 1235-10561.
Report date: May 2011.
Indexed a PDF file.
ASTIS record 74859.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/74859.pdf

Executive Summary: To help guide development in the Canadian Arctic, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) developed the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). The online tool maps the sensitivities of a variety of Arctic features, ranging from whales to traditional harvesting, across the Arctic. The tool is intended to aid government, oil and gas companies, Aboriginal groups, resource managers and public stakeholders in better understanding the geographic distribution of areas which are sensitive for environmental and socio-economic reasons. This document explores two approaches to estimate the relative risk associated with the environmental effects of development activities. It focuses on four Valued Components (VCs): 1. Bowhead whale, 2. Toothed whale, 3. Think-billed murre, 4. Commercial fisheries. Section 2 describes a simple approach for estimating the risk of Project effects. This approach could be adapted, and as appropriate, integrated into the PEMT. Section 3 provides a simple model to estimate the risk of potential cumulative effects. The analyses focus on the offshore areas associated with the Eastern Arctic. It is important to note that the model developed here is not intended to be a full analysis of cumulative effects. Rather, it is intended to be a tool for exploring the potential effects of different development scenarios on different VCs. The results described here suggest that the cumulative effects of development on VCs vary considerably. At one end of the spectrum, bowhead whales are sensitive to development, particularly underwater noise. Relative to routine shipping and drilling activities, seismic operations are expected to contribute the most to cumulative effects. Seabirds such as thick-billed murre can be sensitive to disturbances to their breeding colonies, particularly if aircraft come in very close proximity (although this should generally be avoided as a result of routine flight rules). Compared with bowhead whales, they are much less sensitive to the routine effects of oil and gas development. The commercial turbot fishery falls in between these two extremes. This is a deep water fishery often conducted in depths of 1,000 m or greater. The depth of the fishery in conjunction with the pelagic and migratory nature of turbot reduces the potential for effects on this species from routine oil and gas activities, as well as the potential for cumulative effects. The largest potential for cumulative effects on the commercial turbot fishery is from space conflicts between fishing vessels, and where there is both operating seismic and drill ships. Space conflicts occur when a fishing vessel is unable to access a fishing location due to the presence of either an operating seismic vessel or locations of operating drill ships. The increase in any of the number of fishing vessels, seismic and drilling vessels or all three could potentially lead to increased cumulative effects on the fishery. Overall, the potential for cumulative effects based on the scenarios studied ranged from low to nil. What are the implications for development in the Arctic? Would the development scenario described above put any of the VCs at risk? That question is easiest to answer when there are clear thresholds separating an acceptable environmental effect from one that is not. Thresholds may be ecological (e.g., habitat availability, the viability of a wildlife population), physical (e.g., concentration of contaminants), political (resource management objectives related to a given environmental effect) or social (e.g., acceptable perceived change). Unfortunately, clear thresholds are generally not yet available. For that reason, the analysis is limited to the relative risk of cumulative effects. Despite the limitation, these approaches can be valuable. Both are easy to update as new information becomes available, making them easy to modify and improve. As information on relative importance of environmental effects on a VC (e.g., how probable they are, or how far from a source they extend), the sensitivity of different regions of the Arctic, or thresholds above which environmental effects become problematic becomes available it can easily be incorporated. The model can also be very easily modified to explore and compare the potential effects of different development scenarios. This iterative and exploratory approach could be used to generate discussion on the merits of different development options. It may also focus attention on what information would best contribute to a better understanding of cumulative effects. Both should benefit resource management in the Arctic. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, D, G, T, R, L
Air quality; Airplanes; Animal distribution; Animal health; Animal migration; Animal mortality; Bird nesting; Bowhead whales; Common Murres; Culture (Anthropology); Cumulative effects; Drilling mud disposal; Economic geology; Endangered species; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Fish spawning; Fishing; Greenland halibut; Helicopters; Hunting; Icebreakers; Inuit; Land use; Mapping; Marine mammals; Marine transportation; Mathematical models; Natural resource management; Noise; Offshore oil well drilling; Offshore seismic surveys; Parks; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum leases; Polynyas; Risk assessment; Sea birds; Sea ice ecology; Seasonal variations; Ships; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Thick-billed Murres; Water pollution; Water treatment; Whales; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G0813, G0815, G09, G10
Baffin Bay-Davis Strait; Baffin Island, Nunavut; Brodeur Peninsula, Nunavut; Cumberland Sound, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Frobisher Bay, Nunavut; Greenland; Hay, Cape, (73 44 N, 79 58 W) waters, Nunavut; Isabella Bay, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut; Lancaster Sound, Nunavut; North Water Polynya, Baffin Bay; Searle, Cape, Nunavut; Seymour Island, Nunavut


Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool : High Arctic study area : 2011 update   /   Nunami Stantec   Canada. Northern Oil and Gas [Sponsor]
x, 95 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
References.
Project no.: 1231-10432.
Report date: August 2011.
Indexed a PDF file.
ASTIS record 74858.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/74858.pdf

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Northern Oil and Gas Branch (NOGB) of the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) is responsible for oil and gas resource management in much of northern Canada. To assist in fulfilling its mandate, the NOGB has developed the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). This tool is intended to be used in assisting decision making for exploration investments, for general awareness of sensitivity issues and for understanding INAC processes. Information on several Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs) and Socio-economic Components (VSECs) presented in the web based geographic sensitivity analyses tool for the High Arctic study area is presented. Also included is a preliminary analysis of the petroleum potential of the study area. The study area is located in the High Arctic Archipelago and contains both marine and terrestrial components. The boundaries of the study area are based on the NOGB leasing grids applied in the High Arctic, under which exploration and production licenses may be issued. The Sverdrup Basin (and Lancaster Sound) has the highest known oil and gas potential of the sedimentary basins of the Arctic Islands (Nunavut Planning Commission 2000) and it is expected that there is oil and gas potential on Melville Island and Bathurst Island (Sivummut Economic Development Strategy Group 2003). To date, no gas has been produced, and 321,470 m³ of oil has been produced from Bent Horn (Morrell et al. 1995). This report provides a summary of oil and gas activities and the history of exploration in the study area, and presents supporting information on the series of VECs and VSECs presented in the PEMT. In addition to a rationale behind the sensitivity ranking for each VEC or VSEC, information is presented on general life history, key habitat requirements, sustainability factors, susceptibility to oil and gas activities, mitigation and comments on the certainty associated with the available data. The sensitivity layers are applied to the NOGB's Leasing Grids, facilitating the preliminary identification of areas of high or low sensitivity among several VECs/VSECs, and corresponding high and low values of petroleum potential in the study area. Four VECs and one VSEC are selected to represent the ecological and social components present in the study area. General life history, key habitat requirements, sustainability factors, susceptibility to oil and gas activities, mitigation and comments on the certainty associated with the available data (pertaining to the VECs and VSEC) are included. Oil and gas activities examined include exploration (seismic activities, exploration drilling), production (field development), transportation, and decommissioning and abandonment. The VECs and VSEC selected for the High Arctic study area are: Polar bear (Ursus maritimus), Narwhal (Monodon monoceros), Migratory birds, Species of conservation concern, Traditional harvesting. For each VEC and VSEC, habitat within the High Arctic study area was assigned a sensitivity rating from 1 - 5, where the highest rating (5) identified areas that support a specific ecological function or process that is essential to the survival of the species or cultural resource. The lowest sensitivity ratings (1) include infrequently used areas and areas of relatively low value to the VECs and VSEC. Moderate-Low, Moderate, and Moderate-High rankings indicate intermediate levels of sensitivity. Sensitivity layers accounted for variability in habitat usage and development activities in the open-water and ice covered seasons. This region contains two main petroleum basins which are partly superimposed. The older and more regionally extensive Franklinian Basin of Lower Paleozoic age (Arctic Platform) is overlain in the central Arctic Islands by a deep southwest to northeast trending depocentre containing strata of Upper Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Tertiary age of the Sverdrup basin. ... This report was initially submitted in 2010. This 2011 Update Report includes updates to the geographical extent of the High Arctic Study Area (extended west to the 2000 m bathymetric contour), and associated extension and revision of VC and VSEC senstivity ratings in the larger Study Area. Information on petroleum potential in the expanded study area is currently unavailable, therefore the analysis and figures remain unchanged. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, T, R, L, G, B, E
Animal distribution; Animal migration; Arctic char; Bowhead whales; Caribou; Climate change; Economic geology; Endangered species; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Geographic information systems; History; Hunting; Ice cover; Inuit; Ivory Gulls; Land classification; Land use; Marine mammals; Marine transportation; Narwhals; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Offshore oil fields; Offshore oil well drilling; Offshore seismic surveys; Oil well drilling; Parks; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum geology; Petroleum leases; Polar bears; Red Knots; Risk assessment; Ross' Gulls; Sea birds; Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Ships; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Walruses; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G0813, G0815, G0812, G03, G09
Amund Ringnes Island, Nunavut; Amundsen Gulf, N.W.T.; Arctic Ocean; Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut; Baffin Bay-Davis Strait; Banks Island, N.W.T.; Bathurst Island, Nunavut; Byam Channel, Nunavut; Byam Martin Island, Nunavut; Canadian Arctic Islands; Canadian Arctic Islands waters; Ellef Ringnes Island, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Grise Fiord (Settlement), Nunavut; King Christian Island, Nunavut; Lancaster Sound, Nunavut; Melville Island, N.W.T./Nunavut; Norwegian Bay, Nunavut; Parry Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Prince Patrick Island, N.W.T.; Queen Elizabeth Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands, N.W.T./Nunavut; Queens Channel, Nunavut; Resolute, Nunavut; Sachs Harbour, N.W.T.; Seymour Island, Nunavut; Sverdrup Islands waters, Nunavut; Sverdrup Islands, Nunavut; Ulukhaktok, N.W.T.


Beaufort Sea Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool   /   AECOM Canada Ltd.   Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : AECOM, 2010.
iii, 174, [12] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
Appendices.
References.
Glossary.
Project no.: 60141860.
Report date: March 2010.
Indexed a PDF file.
ASTIS record 73583.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/73583.pdf

Executive Summary: This report accompanies a GIS-based Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT) and database that are intended to support development of strategic options of oil and gas leasing options for portions of the Beaufort Sea and the Mackenzie Delta within the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR). These products were produced for the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) - Northern Oil and Gas Branch (NOGB) to aid the NOGB in meeting their commitments associated with management of oil and gas resources on federal land and the provision of hydrocarbon development opportunities in the North, while ensuring environmental protection. The PEMT will assist managers and decision-makers in choosing appropriate processes and actions to responsibly manage offshore areas petroleum industry activities. The study area and analytical resolution were defined using the oil and gas leasing grid within the Beaufort Sea. The study area has been the scene of oil and gas exploration activity since 1957. Oil was first discovered at Atkinson Point in 1969 and major gas fields in the early 1970's. Such finds spurred the proposal of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline in 1974 and the addition of exploration and investment offshore. Exploration and drilling continued both onshore and offshore until the mid 1970's with the release of the Berger Report, which recommended a 10-year moratorium on the construction of the pipeline. After the release of the Berger Report, the pace of onshore activity declined but offshore exploration escalated in the 1980's. Offshore exploration was facilitated with innovative operating techniques and new offshore platforms that extended the ability to operate in the short open-water season and ice. With the minor exception of the small onshore gas field at Ikhil, no oil or gas has been commercially produced in the area. The preparation of the GIS-based PEMT for the study area required the completion of a series of interrelated steps.The steps included: 1. Identification and review of potential and final valued ecosystem components (VEC) and valued socio-economic components (VSEC); 2. The review of past, present and potential oil and gas development activities in the region, and the residual effects of these activities (Appendix C); 3. The preparation of sensitivity layers for the VECs and VSECs; 4. The preparation of a geo-economic layer; and 5. The development of grid based sensitivity maps. A key aspect of the PEMT development was the selection of Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs) and Valued Socio-Economic Components (VSECs). Following a review of selected literature, Community Conservation Plans, the VECs chosen for this project include polar bear, beluga and bowhead whale, ringed seal, Peary caribou, and migratory birds, both onshore and offshore. When choosing the particular VECs, the project team identified species at risk or species that had high ecological, social, cultural or economic value. All the VECs selected also play an important social, cultural and economic role for the four Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) communities within the study area, i.e., Aklavik, Inuvik, Tuktoyaktuk, and Sachs Harbour. The hunting of polar bears, beluga and bowhead whales, ringed seals, Peary caribou and migratory birds were identified as the crucial socio-economic and cultural component. To sustainably manage their resources, the Inuvialuit communities, designated special areas and recommended land use practices in their community conservation plans (CCP's), depending on the significance and sensitivity of cultural or renewable resources. The VSEC of hunting was selected to be included in the decision support tool because the activity of hunting and the species hunted are susceptible to changes in association with oil and gas activities. The Inuvialuit CCP's were used as the basis of the VSEC sensitivity scores. The geo-economic layer components of the decision-support tool were based on an INAC- developed scorecard rating system for each grid cell in the study area. Each grid cell was scored based on geological factors, economic factors, and uncertainty. Sensitivity maps were developed for each VEC and VSEC for two distinct seasons: open water (May-October), and ice-covered (November-April). The sensitivity layers are a composite of relevant ecosystem (habitat use and availability) and socio-economic information. In their compiled state, they form a sensitivity layer. The sensitivity scores provide a relative appreciation of the biological (highlights the most vulnerable and sensitive areas, seasonal distribution, and provides information on the potential response to change resulting from hydrocarbon development), social or economic values within each area. As well, the PEMT provides a grid based version of each sensitive area. This information can be used by INAC-NOGB as well as other users to manage activities within that grid by providing a better understanding of the sensitive areas within a region. The PEMT process that is to be undertaken by the Branch will involve the development of leasing management options. This PEMT has been designed to eventually support the inclusion of more VEC's and VSEC's as the geographic information becomes available. The tool could also be used to evaluate potential cumulative effects resulting from oil and gas activity in the region at strategic level. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, T, R, L, G, B
Animal distribution; Animal food; Animal migration; Animal population; Arctic cod; Beluga whales; Birds; Bowhead whales; Caribou; Climate change; Denning; Design and construction; Economic geology; Endangered species; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Environmentally significant areas; Geographic information systems; Hunting; Ice cover; Ice roads; Inuit; Marine ecology; Marine mammals; Marine oil spills; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Offshore oil fields; Offshore oil well drilling; Offshore seismic surveys; Oil spills; Oil well drilling; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum geology; Petroleum leases; Polar bears; Sea birds; Sea ice; Seals (Animals); Seasonal variations; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G07, G0815, G0812, G0811
Banks Island, N.W.T.; Canadian Beaufort Sea; Inuvialuit Settlement Region, N.W.T./Yukon; Kendall Island Migratory Bird Sanctuary, N.W.T.; Kugmallit Bay, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; Shallow Bay, N.W.T.; Viscount Melville Sound, N.W.T./Nunavut; Yukon North Slope


Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool : Eastern Arctic study area : final report   /   Nunami Stantec   Canada. Northern Oil and Gas [Sponsor]
Burnaby, B.C. : Nunami Stantec, 2010.
x, 131 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
References.
Project no.: 1231-10162.
Report date: November 2010.
Indexed a PDF file.
ASTIS record 73014.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/73014.pdf

The Northern Oil and Gas Branch (NOGB) of the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) is responsible for oil and gas resource management in much of northern Canada. To assist in fulfilling its mandate, the NOGB has developed the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). This tool is intended to be used in assisting decision making for exploration investments, for general awareness of sensitivity issues and for understanding INAC processes. Information on several Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs) and Socio-economic Components (VSECs) presented in the web based geographic sensitivity analyses tool for the Eastern Arctic study area is presented. Also included is a preliminary analysis of the petroleum potential of the study area. The study area is located east of Baffin Island, Nunavut and encompasses marine habitat in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. The boundaries of the study area are based on NOGB leasing grids applied in the Eastern Arctic, under which exploration and production licenses may be issued. Although portions of the study area hold high oil and gas potential and several small oil fields and substantial reserves of gas have been found since the 1960s in the north Baffin region, exploration for oil and gas has been limited to seismic operations and geological field work. Six VECs and two VSECs were selected to represent the ecological and social components present in the study area. General life history, key habitat requirements, sustainability factors, susceptibility to oil and gas activities, mitigation and comments on the certainty associated with the available data (pertaining to the VECs and VSECs) are included. Oil and gas activities examined included exploration (seismic activities, exploration drilling), production (field development), transportation, and decommissioning and abandonment. The VECs and VSECs selected for the Eastern Arctic study area are: Polar bear (Ursus maritimus), Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus), Toothed whales (Narwhal, Monodon monoceros and beluga, Delphinapterus leucas), Arctic Char (Salvelinus alpinus), Migratory birds, Species of conservation concern, Traditional harvesting, Commercial Fishing. For each VEC and VSEC, habitat within the Eastern Arctic study area was assigned a sensitivity rating from 1 - 5, where the highest rating (5) identified areas that support a specific ecological function or process that is essential to the survival of the species or cultural resource. The lowest sensitivity ratings (1) include infrequently used areas and areas of relatively low value to the VECs and VSECs. Moderately-Low, Moderate, and Moderately High rankings indicate intermediate levels of sensitivity. Sensitivity layers accounted for variability in habitat usage and development activities in the open-water and ice covered seasons. The ranking of petroleum potential used a five point scale from very high (5) to very low (1). Qualitatively, petroleum resource potential in the study area varies between very low and very high. Geological factors in the study area are favourable for oil and gas generation and entrapment, therefore no rankings below moderate were assigned. Very high ranking was given to the areas where the potential has been demonstrated by discovery. Where no discovery has been made, the ranking was lowered to high or moderate dependant on other indicators. The utility of the PEMT depends on the availability and quality of spatial data for the VECs and VSECs. Currently available data for most VECs in this area is limited and/or dated. The current iteration of the PEMT is therefore a coarse instrument which provides general information and predictions on resource sensitivities. As additional information becomes available, it is important that the tool is updated to reflect the most recent knowledge on the biophysical or cultural components of interest. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, D, G, T, R, L
Animal distribution; Animal migration; Arctic char; Arctic foxes; Bird nesting; Bowhead whales; Caribou; Climate change; Economic geology; Endangered species; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Fisheries; Fishing; Geographic information systems; History; Hunting; Ice cover; Inuit; Land classification; Land use; Marine mammals; Marine transportation; Muskoxen; Narwhals; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Offshore oil fields; Offshore oil well drilling; Offshore seismic surveys; Oil well drilling; Parks; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum leases; Polar bears; Polynyas; Reclamation; Sea birds; Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G0813, G0815, G0812, G09, G10
Baffin Bay-Davis Strait; Baffin Island, Nunavut; Brodeur Peninsula, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Frobisher Bay, Nunavut; Greenland; Hudson Strait, Nunavut/Québec; Lancaster Sound, Nunavut; Melville Peninsula, Nunavut; Nunavut; Southampton Island, Nunavut


Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool : High Arctic study area : final report   /   Nunami Stantec   Canada. Northern Oil and Gas [Sponsor]
Burnaby, B.C. : Nunami Stantec, 2010.
x, 82 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
Cover title.
References.
Project no.: 1231-10162.
Report date: December 2010.
Indexed a PDF file.
ASTIS record 73010.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/73010.pdf

Executive Summary: The Northern Oil and Gas Branch (NOGB) of the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) is responsible for oil and gas resource management in much of northern Canada. To assist in fulfilling its mandate, the NOGB has developed the Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool (PEMT). This tool is intended to be used in assisting decision making for exploration investments, for general awareness of sensitivity issues and for understanding INAC processes. Information on several Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs) and Socio-economic Components (VSECs) presented in the web based geographic sensitivity analyses tool for the High Arctic study area is presented. Also included is a preliminary analysis of the petroleum potential of the study area. The study area is located in the High Arctic Archipelago and contains both marine and terrestrial components. The boundaries of the study area are based on the NOGB leasing grids applied in the High Arctic, under which exploration and production licenses may be issued. The Sverdrup Basin (and Lancaster Sound) has the highest known oil and gas potential of the sedimentary basins of the Arctic Islands (Nunavut Planning Commission 2000) and it is expected that there is oil and gas potential on Melville Island and Bathurst Island (Sivummut Economic Development Strategy Group 2003). To date, no gas has been produced, and 321,470 m³ of oil has been produced from Bent Horn (Morrell, et al. 1995). The study area is located in the High Arctic Archipelago and contains both marine and terrestrial components. This report provides a summary of oil and gas activities and the history of exploration in the study area, and presents supporting information on the series of Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs) and Socio-economic Components (VSECs) presented in the web based geographic sensitivity analyses tool. In addition to a rationale behind the sensitivity ranking for each VEC or VSEC, information is presented on general life history, key habitat requirements, sustainability factors, susceptibility to oil and gas activities, mitigation and comments on the certainty associated with the available data. The sensitivity layers are applied to the Northern Oil and Gas Branch's Leasing Grids, facilitating the preliminary identification of areas of high or low sensitivity among several VECs/VSECs, and corresponding high and low values of petroleum potential in the study area. Four VECs and one VSEC were selected to represent the ecological and social components present in the study area. General life history, key habitat requirements, sustainability factors, susceptibility to oil and gas activities, mitigation and comments on the certainty associated with the available data (pertaining to the VECs and VSECs) are included. Oil and gas activities examined included exploration (seismic activities, exploration drilling), production (field development), transportation, and decommissioning and abandonment. The VECs and VSECs selected for the High Arctic study area are: Polar bear (Ursus maritimus), Narwhal (Monodon monoceros), Migratory birds, Species of conservation concern, Traditional harvesting. For each VEC and VSEC, habitat within the High Arctic study area was assigned a sensitivity rating from 1-5, where the highest rating (5) identified areas that support a specific ecological function or process that is essential to the survival of the species or cultural resource. The lowest sensitivity ratings (1) include infrequently used areas and areas of relatively low value to the VECs and VSECs. Moderately-Low, Moderate, and Moderately High rankings indicate intermediate levels of sensitivity. Sensitivity layers accounted for variability in habitat usage and development activities in the open-water and ice covered seasons. This region contains two main petroleum basins which are partly superposed. The older and more regionally extensive Franklinian Basin of Lower Paleozoic age (Arctic Platform) is overlain in the central Arctic Islands by a deep south-west to northeast trending depocentre containing strata of Upper Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Tertiary age of the Sverdrup basin. The region saw extensive exploration from the late 1960s to mid 1980s. After early and unsuccessful drilling in the lower Paleozoic rocks of the Parry Islands Fold Belt along the southern margin of the region, exploration moved north across a major hinge line into the Sverdrup Basin. Success followed soon afterwards with the discovery of a major gas field at Drake Point in 1969, followed by a succession of 18 further discoveries. In 1974, an oil discovery was made at Bent Horn on Cameron Island. To date this is the only discovery in the Arctic Islands to have been placed on production (production ceased in 1996). The potential of the central part of the Sverdrup Basin is qualified as 'very high'. The geological environment here is very favorable and significant accumulations are known. The potential of the southern margin of the Sverdrup Basin and areas of the bordering Arctic Platform ranges from 'high' to 'moderate'. In the northern and northeastern Sverdrup the potential is generally low. In these areas, while some aspects of the geological environment may be favorable, few if any occurrences are known and there is a low probability that undiscovered deposits/accumulations are present. The relatively sparse exploration that has occurred across much of the region, including in those areas ranked as 'low' may indicate a lack of geological knowledge and uncertainty as to the petroleum potential. The utility of the PEMT depends on the availability and quality of spatial data for the VECs and VSECs. Currently available data for most VECs in this area is limited and/or dated. The current iteration of the PEMT is therefore a coarse instrument which provides general information and predictions on resource sensitivities. As additional information becomes available, it is important that the tool is updated to reflect the most recent knowledge on the biophysical or cultural components of interest. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, T, R, L, G, B
Animal distribution; Animal migration; Arctic char; Caribou; Climate change; Economic geology; Endangered species; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Geographic information systems; History; Hunting; Ice cover; Inuit; Land classification; Land use; Marine mammals; Marine transportation; Narwhals; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Offshore oil fields; Offshore oil well drilling; Offshore seismic surveys; Oil well drilling; Parks; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum geology; Petroleum leases; Polar bears; Sea birds; Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G0813, G0815, G0812, G03
Amund Ringnes Island, Nunavut; Arctic Ocean; Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut; Bathurst Island, Nunavut; Byam Channel, Nunavut; Byam Martin Island, Nunavut; Ellef Ringnes Island, Nunavut; Mackenzie King Island, N.W.T./Nunavut; Melville Island, N.W.T./Nunavut; Norwegian Bay, Nunavut; Parry Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Prince Patrick Island, N.W.T.; Queen Elizabeth Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Sachs Harbour, N.W.T.; Seymour Island, Nunavut; Sverdrup Islands waters, Nunavut


Development of a decision support tool for resource management in support of a strategic environmental assessment for the Canadian Beaufort Sea   /   Gartner Lee Limited   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : Gartner Lee, 2008.
ii, [8], 111, A-1 - A-6, B-1 - B-11, C-1 - C-7, D-1 - D-3 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
Reference: GLL 80197.
Report date: March 2008.
Includes many maps, some of which fold-out.
Indexed a PDF file.
BREA Report Type: Summary Report of a Strategic Environmental Assessment.
BREA Baseline Data: Yes, some maps of baseline information for VCs provided.
BREA Biophysical / Valued Components: Yes, valued ecosystem and socio-economic components identified and data used summarized in Table 14.
BREA Development Scenarios / Activities: Yes, review of past and potential development activities provided.
BREA Impact Hypotheses: No, residual effects of hydrocarbon development summarized in Table 19.
BREA Environmental Concerns Identified: Yes.
BREA Harvest Concerns Identified: Yes.
BREA Social Concerns Identified: No.
BREA Research / Monitoring Recommendations: No.
ASTIS record 66070.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/66070.pdf

Executive Summary: This report accompanies a GIS-based decision support tool and database that are intended to facilitate the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of oil and gas leasing options for a portion of the Beaufort Sea. These products were produced for the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) - Northern Oil and Gas Branch (NOGB) to aid the NOGB in meeting their commitments associated with management of oil and gas resources on federal land and the provision of hydrocarbon development opportunities in the North, while ensuring environmental protection. The SEA will assist managers and decision-makers in choosing appropriate processes and actions to responsibly manage the opening of offshore areas petroleum industry activities. The study area and analytical resolution was defined using the oil and gas leasing grid within the Beaufort Sea. The study area has been the scene of oil and gas exploration activity since 1957. Oil was first discovered at Atkinson Point in 1969 and major gas fields in the early 1970s. Such finds spurred the proposal of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline in 1974 and the addition of exploration and investment offshore. Exploration and drilling continued both onshore and offshore until the mid 1970s with the release of the Berger Report, which recommended a 10-year moratorium on the construction of the pipeline. After the release of the Berger Report, the pace of onshore activity declined but offshore exploration escalated in the 1980s. Offshore exploration was facilitated with innovative operating techniques and new offshore platforms that extended the ability to operate in the short open-water season and ice. With the minor exception of the small onshore gas field at Ikhil, no oil or gas has been commercially produced in the area. The preparation of the GIS-based decision-support tool for the study area required the completion of a series of inter-related steps. The steps included: 1. identification and review of potential and final valued ecosystem components (VEC) and valued socio-economic components (VSEC); 2. the review of past, present and potential oil and gas development activities in the region, and the residual effects of these activities; 3. the preparation of sensitivity layers for the VEC and VSEC; 4. the preparation of the geo-economic layer; and 5. the development of decision-rules around the sensitivity layers. A key aspect of the decision-support tool development was the selection of Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs) and Valued Socio-Economic Components (VSECs). Following a review of selected literature, Community Conservation Plans, the VECs chosen for this project include polar bear, beluga whale, ringed seal and migratory birds. When choosing the particular VECs, the project team identified species at risk or species that had high ecological, social, cultural or economic value. All the VECs selected also play an important social, cultural and economic role for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) communities, which include Aklavik, Inuvik, Tuktoyaktuk, Ulukhaktok, Sachs Harbour, and Paulatuk. The hunting and trapping of polar bears, beluga whales, ringed seals and migratory birds were identified as the crucial socio-economic and cultural component. To sustainably manage their resources, the Inuvialuit communities designated special areas and recommended land use practices in their community conservation plans (CCPs), depending on the significance and sensitivity of cultural or renewable resources. The VSEC of hunting was selected to be included in the decision support tool because the activity of hunting and the species hunted are susceptible to changes in association with oil and gas activities. The CCPs were used as the basis of the VSEC sensitivity scores. The geo-economic layer components of the deci sion-support tool were based on an INAC-developed scorecard rating system for each grid cell in the study area. Each grid cell was scored based on geological factors, economic factors, and uncertainty. The sensitivity layers are a composite of various pieces of relevant ecosystem (habitat use and availability) and socio-economic information. In their compiled state, they form a sensitivity layer. In some situations there was an intersection of more than one sensitivity rating within a single grid cell. Decision rules were developed to assign the overall sensitivity rating for those grid cells. The rules allow for various levels of conservativeness to be considered related to the sensitivity ratings for a grid cell. Three decision rules were applied in calculating a grid rating, (grid assigned maximum score of scores present, grid assigned mean score of scores present, and grid assigned max value of scores present if 90% of the area of the grid is covered by the max score). This report presents the most conservative scores for the grids. The ability to compare conservativeness is embedded within the decision support tool options. A sensitivity map was developed for each VEC and VSEC. The sensitivity scores provide a relative appreciation of the biological (highlights the most vulnerable and sensitive areas, seasonal distribution, and provides information on the potential response to change resulting from hydrocarbon development), social or economic values within grid. This information can be used by INAC-NOGB as well as other users to manage activities within that grid by providing a better understanding of the sensitive areas within a region. Management options to be applied by NOGB are yet to be determined. The Strategic Environmental Assessment process that is to be undertaken by the Branch will involve the development of leasing management options. This decision-support tool has been designed to eventually support the inclusion of more VECs and VSECs as the geographic information becomes available. The tool could also be used to evaluate potential cumulative effects resulting from oil and gas activity in the region at a strategic level. Preliminary work was completed on a summary of residual effects associated with offshore oil and gas activity (effects that persist after the application of mitigation) that could act in a cumulative fashion to impact the environment and social structure of the region. This work needs to be further refined and confirmed but has been included in an appendix of this document. (Au)

Q, S, J, N, I, D, G, T, R
Animal distribution; Animal migration; Beluga whales; Culture (Anthropology); Cumulative effects; Environmental impact assessment; Environmental impacts; Environmental protection; Geographic information systems; Hunting; Inuit; Land classification; Land use; Marine ecology; Marine mammals; Natural area preservation; Natural resource management; Ocean management; Offshore oil fields; Offshore oil well drilling; Parks; Petroleum and Environmental Management Tool; Petroleum law; Petroleum leases; Planning; Polar bears; Risk assessment; Sea birds; Sea ice; Seals (Animals); Seasonal variations; Socio-economic effects; Subsistence; Wildlife habitat; Wildlife management

G07, G0812, G0811
Aklavik, N.W.T.; Canadian Beaufort Sea; Inuvialuit Settlement Region waters, N.W.T./Yukon; Inuvik, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; Mackenzie Estuary, N.W.T./Yukon; Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula waters, N.W.T.; Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T.; Yukon North Slope


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