ASTIS - Arctic Science and Technology Information System


A search of the ASTIS database for "TAG DIRS" has found the following 225 records, which are sorted by first author.


Devon Island Research Station, 1975
(Arctic, v. 28, no. 3, Sept. 1975, p. 226)
ASTIS record 53531.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic28-3-226.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2838
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute field station on the Truelove Lowlands of Devon Island was activated for a brief period during late July and August of this year, largely for the purposes of an inspection of the station buildings and equipment, and the performance of necessary maintenance operations. Researchers present during the season, and their projects, were: Dr. Carlyle Jordan and Mr. Robert Merrick, University of Guelph, Ontario: Biological fixation of nitrogen in arctic sedge-moss; Dr. G.M. Courtin and Mr. Peter Nosko, Laurentian University, Ontario: Water relations of Carex stans on Devon Island; Dr. D. Pearson, Laurentian University, Ontario: Palaeozoic sedimentary cover. In spite of several days of unusually heavy rain, Dr. Jordan and Mr. Merrick managed to complete almost every phase of their planned experiments in the study of the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. They estimated the fixation rates at several sites - on a mesic meadow, a beach ridge, an intermediate zone and a polar desert site - under aerobic, microaerophilic, light and dark conditions, and with microbial activity stimulated by glucose addition and blocked by a metabolic inhibitor. The biomass activity was determined at each site by carbon dioxide evolution from added glucose. Core samples were removed at two depths from each site and from additional sites on a hydric meadow and on a bog polygon. Other data included soil temperatures, pH and oxidation-reduction potential. In addition, Dr. Jordan took the opportunity to visually survey the area in the immediate vicinity of the base camp with a view to the better location of other sites for sampling in the near future. A collection of flowering plants from Devon Island was also made. Soil cores removed by Dr. Jordan and Mr. Merrick will be examined bacteriologically at the University of Guelph, while the polar desert material will be the subject of part of a study by the University's Department of Land Resource Science. In addition, intact moss blocks from Devon Island have been kept alive in a healthy state at the University, and Mr. Merrick will study the numbers, types and activities of the microorganisms associated with the moss surfaces. Such associated microorganisms, principally the blue-green algae, appear to dominate nitrogen fixation in the arctic ecosystem, and the relationships between their activities and the moss surfaces are of considerable importance. Dr. Courtin and his assistant made further sample collections to support their earlier studies carried on at Devon Island under the sponsorship of the Canadian Committee of the International Biological Program. Dr. Pearson was concerned with reconnaissance of the area with a view to possible future programmes of study of geological processes. Mr. Ward Elcock, camp manager, reported that all buildings were intact, and that intrusions bipolar bears had not occurred as in previous years. Maintenance work at the station included tidying-up operations around the station area, the erection of radio antenna masts, and a general inventory. The Institute acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of the Polar Continental Shelf Project in making this very short season a successful one. (Au)

H, F, J, B, C

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Ecology of Collembola at a High Arctic site, Devon Island, N.W.T   /   Addison, J.A.   Parkinson, D. [Supervisor]
Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary, 1975.
xv, 212 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
(Canadian theses on microfiche, no. 28477)
Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Calgary, Dept. of Biology, Calgary, Alta., 1975.
Bibliography: p. 194-210.
ASTIS record 34271.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The ecology of the collembolan fauna was investigated at 3 sites on the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. Since Hypogastrura tullbergi Schaffer and Folsomia regularis Hammer were the two most abundant species on the Truelove Lowland, much of the research centered on these species. Population densities of Collembola, based on derived means were 4,700 Collembola m² at the Meadow Site, 11,700 m² at the Beach Ridge Site, and 14,700 m² at the Transition Zone Site. Investigations into the population biology of Hypogastrura tullbergi indicated that reproductive activity was confined to a period of 2-3 weeks every season, and that individuals of this species were able to breed in up to 3 different years. Individuals of Folsomia regularis and Hypogastrura tullbergi were estimated to survive for up to 4 and 5 years respectively, and both species had flexible life cycles. The most important factors influencing collembolan distribution on Devon Island were humidity and temperature. The macroflora was considered to affect collembolan populations indirectly, by modifying the microclimate. In laboratory feeding studies, Hypogastrura tullbergi showed a clear preference for fungal substrates whereas Folsomia regularis selected decomposing organic materials. Analysis of the gut contents of field caught animals indicated that both species ingested mainly organic matter, although fungal materials constituted a higher percentage of the gut contents of H. tullbergi than of F. regularis. Growth rates of both H. tullbergi and F. regularis were low, and growth of H. tullbergi at field temperatures was found to be limited by diet rather than temperature per se. Maximum growth rates of adult individuals of H. tullbergi occurred at 10°C. The temperature response of growth rates in juvenile individuals of H. tullbergi differed from that of the adults, with juveniles showing measurable increases in weight at 2°C, and maximum growth rates at 15°C instead of 10°C. At 10°C the respiratory rates of Hypogastrura tullbergi (222.7 µl O2/g dry wt/h) and Onychiurus groenlandicus Tullberg (118.7 µl O2/g dry wt/h) were lower than those reported for cold-adapted Collembola, but the rate of respiration of Folsomia regularis (305 µl O2/g dry wt/h) indicated some degree of adaptation to cold climates. The rates of soil metabolism in experimental soil cores under field conditions were generally higher in the presence of Collembola than when these animals were excluded. Different species of Collembola enhanced soil metabolism by different amounts. At high densities in laboratory experiments, Collembola apparently caused a decrease in the rate of organic matter decomposition. In conclusion, ecological adaptations, and the functional role of Collembola in a High Arctic Ecosystem were discussed. (Au)

I, J, E, C
Animal ecology; Animal food; Animal growth; Animal population; Animal respiration; Atmospheric humidity; Atmospheric temperature; Bioclimatology; Biodegradation; Biological sampling; Cold adaptation; Collembola; Internal organs; Metabolism; Necropsy; Oxygen; Soil microorganisms; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Population dynamics and biology of Collembola on Truelove Lowland   /   Addison, J.A.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 363-382, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16649.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Collembola are amongst the most abundant and widespread of soil arthropods. Species lists for several areas of the Canadian Arctic Islands are now available (Oliver 1963, McAlpine 1965, Danks and Byers 1972), but there has been little attempt to measure the seasonal variation in abundance of different species, and even less to investigate the biological significance of collembolan populations. ... The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the population dynamics, life histories, and feeding biology of certain arctic collembolan species, and (2) to attempt to define the impact of the biological activities of these animals on the environment. Field work was carried out during the summer months of 1972, 1973, and 1974, with most of the work taking place during the latter two years. As Hypogastrura tullbergi and Folsomia regularis were the most widely distributed and abundant Collembola at the Devon island site, much of the research centered on these two species. (Au)

I
Animal population; Collembola

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Biology of Hypogastrura tullbergi (Collembola) at a High Arctic site   /   Addison, J.A.
(Holarctic ecology, v. 4, no. 1, Feb. 1981, p. 49-58, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 7917.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1600-0587.1981.tb00980.x
Libraries: ACU

The life cycle, reproductive biology and growth rates of Hypogastrura tullbergi (Schaffer), one of the most abundant and widespread Collembola on Devon Island, N.W.T., were investigated. ... The adaptive significance of aspects of the biology of H. tullbergi for long-term survival in tundra environments is discussed. (Au)

I
Collembola

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Studies on evapotranspiration and energy budgets on Truelove Lowland   /   Addison, P.A.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 281-300
References.
ASTIS record 16644.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

...It is important that energy budget studies accompany those of water balance, since plant adaptations for water conservation may have far reaching effects on the overall energy regime of a plant community. Plant adaptations to water deficit, therefore, are limited to some extent, because a balance must be reached between the minimum rate of water loss possible and the maximum leaf temperature that can be tolerated. The aims of this study were: (1) to determine the energy budgets of the two dominant plant communities in this high arctic ecosystem; (2) to study the plant-soil-water relations of plant communities at the ends of a soil moisture gradient; and (3) to explore the ecological implications of presumed adaptations to environmental conditions. Two sites, a raised beach and a meadow, were chosen for intensive study as they represented the two dominant vegetation types on Truelove Lowland (Bliss 1972). ... (Au)

H, J
Effects of climate on plants; Energy budgets; Evaporation; Plant ecology; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Synoptic climate controls of mass-balance variations on Devon ice cap   /   Alt, B.T.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 10, no. 1, Feb. 1978, p. 61-80, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 162.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550657
Libraries: ACU

Fourteen years (1961 through 1974) of synoptic weather charts for June through August were examined along with available meteorological and glaciological data from the northwest region of Devon Island ice cap, N.W.T., Canada. Use of a simple synoptic classification system facilitated investigation of the manner in which summer synoptic conditions control mass-balance fluctuations on the ice cap. ... (Au)

F, E
Effects of climate on snow; Glaciers; Mass balance; Spatial distribution; Synoptic climatology

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut


Association of plant distribution patterns and microenvironments on patterned ground in a polar desert, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Anderson, D.G.   Bliss, L.C.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 30, no. 2, May 1998, p. 97-107, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 47205.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1552124
Libraries: ACU

In this study, we quantify the distribution patterns of vascular plant species among microsites (stony border, transition, and center) of sorted stone nets and stripes. We also monitored edaphic factors (frost heave, temperature, moisture, and texture) at three intensive sites to identify controls on plant distribution. Adult plants were more abundant in the transition microsite (73 and 77%) with its cryptogamic crust than random distribution would predict (transition cover 17 and 14%) at the noncrusted stone nets and stone strips, respectively. Adult plants were frost heaved (10 and 32%) from the bare-soil center microsites at both sites. Nearly all of the few seedlings were in the transition microsite. At the crusted stone net, three species were randomly distributed; five species were over-represented in the two border microsites and two species were underrepresented there. No plants were frost heaved at this site and seedlings were abundant. There were 7.3 plants per lineal meter at the crusted net and only 3.0 and 2.3 plants per lineal meter at the noncrusted stone stripes and stone nets respectively. Of the environmental factors measured, soil heave (measured as soil settlement) appears most influential. Surface soils (0-1 cm) dry between summer rains and this may inhibit seedling establishment some summers. Soils at depth (5-10 cm) remain near saturation. Soil temperatures differed little between microsites as did soil texture. (Au)

J, H, C
Frost heaving; Patterned ground; Plant distribution; Plant-soil relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Thawing; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Arctic Institute Devon Island Expedition 1960   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 13, no. 4, Dec. 1960, p. 270-271)
ASTIS record 60946.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic13-4-270.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3707
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute of North America ... initiated the Devon Island Expedition 1960-1963, the objectives of which are: (1) A study of the relationships between the marine environment (Jones Sound), the Devon Island Ice Cap, and the atmosphere, with special regard to heat budget, energy flow, and moisture transfer. (2) A detailed investigation of the oceanography and marine biology of Jones Sound. (3) A detailed investigation of the archaeology, biology, and geology of Devon Island, together with other studies that may provide auxiliary information for objective (1). The main purpose of the 1960 expedition was to establish facilities and cache supplies to support the scientific program beginning in 1961. ... The party left Quebec City on July 31 on board C.M.S. d'Iberville and arrived off Cape Skogn, Devon Island on August 20. By August 24 a camp consisting of three prefabricated Jamesway buildings and stores for twenty people for 5 months was installed at 75°42'N. 84°26'W. An 18-mile tractor route to the edge of the ice cap was then laid out and 6 tons of ice cap station supplies were hauled to the top of a 1000-foot plateau at the beginning of that route. ... It was decided to cache the supplies at the edge of the plateau and to establish the ice cap station in the spring of 1961, when the ground will be frozen. ... The archaeologists located two previously unknown sites. The first, in the vicinity of the base camp, includes four or five houses, three temporary houses, and several caches. It is probably a late Thule site. The second site is located near the western tip of Cape Sparbo and has been tentatively named the "Inapok" site. It ... includes 9 houses tent rings, and a number of other structures. There are undoubtedly both Dorset and Thule, and perhaps pre-Dorset elements in the site. The entire site is well preserved and has yielded about 90 artifacts including Dorset blades, microblade points, burins, microburins, burin spalls, knives, and end blades. Oliver continued his study of arctic chironomids and other aquatic insects by extensive collecting at Resolute and on Devon Island. Harington measured over 60 musk ox skulls and made a comprehensive plant collection. The Devon Island Station will be reoccupied in late April 1961, at which time the ice cap station will be established. Studies in meteorology, glaciology, oceanography, marine biology, and geology will then begin. The archaeological work will continue with a detailed excavation of the "Inapok" site and further reconnaissance of the island. (Au)

V, M, U, I, H
Animal collections; Aquatic insects; Artifacts; Biological sampling; Bones; Chironomidae; Dorset culture; Equipment and supplies; Expeditions; Inuit archaeology; Logistics; Measurement; Muskoxen; Plant collections; Portable buildings; Prefabrication; Research stations; Thule culture

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Jones Sound region, Nunavut; Resolute, Nunavut; Skogn, Cape, Nunavut; Sparbo, Cape, region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The chlorophyll content of Arctic sea-ice   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 14, no. 3, Sept. 1961, p. 197-200)
References.
ASTIS record 50877.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic14-3-197.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3674
Libraries: ACU

A number of observers, working in arctic and antarctic waters, have commented on the discoloration of sea-ice caused by unicellular algae, mainly diatoms, that are frozen into the ice. The discoloration is usually seen when the ice is broken and over turned, because it occurs principally on the lower surface of the ice and occasionally on its sides. The brown or greenish-brown colour is due to the chloroplasts in the algae and undoubtedly indicates the presence of a potential source of food in polar seas in addition to the phytoplankton and the benthic algae. The algae associated with the ice present interesting problems concerning the adaptation of protoplasm to life under conditions of low temperatures (maximum about -1.68°C.) and of the adaptation of photosynthetic activity to low light intensities. Although they have been frequently observed, these algae have been very little studied, partly on account of collecting difficulties. Investigations of algae frozen into sea-ice have been started at the Devon Island station (75° 42'N.) of the Arctic Institute and some preliminary results are reported here. ... (Au)

H, G

G0815
Jones Sound, Nunavut


The Devon Island Expedition   /   Apollonio, S.   Cowie, J.W.   Voegtli, K.   Koerner, R.M.   Cress, P.   Wyness, R.   Greenhouse, J.P.
(Arctic, v. 14, no. 4, Dec. 1961, p. 252-265, ill.)
Reference.
ASTIS record 50882.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic14-4-252.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3683
Libraries: ACU

In 1959 the Arctic Institute of North America undertook an integrated program of long term research on Devon Island in the Queen Elizabeth Islands of arctic Canada. The co-ordinated studies were designed to help understand the interrelationships between the glacier ice of Devon Island, the ocean in Jones Sound, and the encompassing atmosphere. They are being carried out over a 3-year period under the leadership of Spencer Apollonio. The main effort is concentrated on attempts to evaluate such factors as physical, chemical, and biological variations in the arctic waters of Jones Sound caused by discharging glaciers; evaporation and transfer of moisture between the ocean waters and the ice-cap and glaciers; and the overall influences of solar radiation energy on the mass balance of the ice-cap, the biological production in the sea, and the growth and decay of sea-ice. Some supplementary studies in archaeology and geology are included in the expedition's work because of the marked deficiency of knowledge in those subjects for Devon Island. In the late summer of 1960 a main base was established on the north shore of Devon Island near Cape Skogn by an advance party of eight men taken in with their materials by the Canada Department of Transport icebreaker "d'Iberville". During a 3-week period buildings were erected and routes inland and to the ice-cap explored and marked, while an archaeological reconnaissance of the Cape Sparbo area was made by a small party under Mr. Gordon Lowther of McGill University. Everything was installed for a beginning of the 3-year program in April 1961. During the months of April to September 1961 21 men worked on extensive programs in geophysics, glaciology, marine biology and oceanography, meteorology, and surveying. Intensive work was also completed in archaeology and geology. ... (Au)

F, A, G, B, F, D, C, I, U

G0813, G0815
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut; Sparbo, Cape, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Devon Island Expedition 1960-64 : preliminary report for September 1961 to September 1962   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 15, no. 4, Dec. 1962, p. 317-321)
ASTIS record 55396.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic15-4-317.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3587
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute is maintaining a research program on Devon Island, N.W.T., the purposes of which include fundamental studies in geophysics, glaciology, meteorology, and oceanography, with particular attention to the interrelationships between the marine and glacial environments. Detailed studies in archaeology and geology are also supported. The establishment of the base station and the preliminary archaeological reconnaissance in 1960 have been reported in Arctic 13:270-71. A summary of the field work of the first full season, 1961, together with several preliminary reports has appeared in Arctic 14:252-65. The field season of 1961 ended on September 12 when the various field parties were taken to Thule, Greenland, by the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Westwind. ... (Au)

B, G, E, D, U, F, H

G0813, G0815
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Chlorophyll in arctic sea ice   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 18, no. 2, June 1965, p. 118-122, tables)
ASTIS record 9959.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic18-2-118.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3457
Libraries: ACU

Reviews investigations 1961-1963 into chlorophyll concentrations in sea ice in both arctic and antarctic regions. Results are compared with own researches off Devon Island, Canada, which are reported in detail. Chlorophyll a and c concentrations were obtained from underside of ice by a 7.5 cm diam ice corer and light penetration was measured by freezing a photometer into the ice; readings of both are tabulated. Chlorophyll values exceed concentrations in open sea water. The values were found to fall with increased light, and the high ratio of c to a is interpreted as a adaptation for maximum absorption of blue light through ice and snow. The algae are associated mainly with young ice peripheral to the Arctic Ocean. As a primary production resource, an estimated volume of 25 X 10*6 kg of chlorophyll a for a two-month for the arctic region is considered conservative. (AB)

G, H

G0813
Jones Sound, Nunavut


Letters to the editor [On the 50th anniversary of the Devon Island Research Station]   /   Apollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 63, no. 2, June 2010, p. 248-249)
References.
ASTIS record 70562.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic63-2-248.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic985
Libraries: ACU

This year, 2010, is the 50th anniversary of the establishment of the Arctic Institute's research station on Devon Island. The station supported a wide variety of research and teaching activities for more than 40 years, far longer than was originally conceived. It continues to be useful to the hunters and trappers of Grise Fiord. ... (Au)

V, Y, U, B, E, D, F
Archaeology; Design and construction; Equipment and supplies; Geology; Geophysics; Glaciology; History; Marine biology; Meteorology; Ocean-atmosphere interaction; Oceanography; Research; Research stations; Transportation

G0813, G0815
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Marine primary production in the Canadian Arctic, 1956, 1961-1963   /   Apollonio, S.   Matrai, P.
(Polar biology, v. 34, no. 5, May 2011, p. 767-774, ill.)
References.
Electronic supplementary material is available in the online version of this article.
ASTIS record 73815.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1007/s00300-010-0928-3
Libraries: ACU

Marine primary productivity studies pursued in the Canadian Arctic in 1961-1963, using standard techniques (oxygen and carbon-14) of the time, showed that maximum production developed rapidly in July at 5-m depth under very low light intensities and under intact but melting sea ice. The time of maximum production was correlated with depths of snow in spring. Low production levels were found in August in those years and estimated in 1956. Nitrate exhaustion occurred before maximum production and was followed by rapid sinking of chlorophyll and productivity and reduction of assimilation numbers. Gross production values greatly exceeded net production values in 1961-1963, and gross production in 2 years was about double that of a third year, which may be due to different initial conditions of nutrient concentrations in the euphotic zone. Interannual variability in primary production may be the result of changes in water masses in the surface layer, as driven by atmospheric pressure patterns. (Au)

D, H, G, E, J, F
Atmospheric pressure; Carbon; Chlorophyll; Equipment and supplies; Light; Marine ecology; Measurement; Melting; Oxygen; Photosynthesis; Phytoplankton; Primary production (Biology); Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Snow; Temporal variations; Water masses

G0815
Allen Bay, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut


Over-winter oceanographic profiles in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, November 1961 - June 1962 : temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients   /   Apollonio, S.   Townsend, D.W.
(Arctic, v. 64, no. 4, Dec. 2011, p. 413-420, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 75082.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic64-4-413.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4140
Libraries: ACU

Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and inorganic nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, and silicate) were measured at five depths (2, 10, 25, 50, and 80 m) beneath the ice off the southern shore of Jones Sound, north of Devon Island, through the winter of 1961 - 62. Additional data were collected from the north side of the sound off Grise Fiord, Ellesmere Island, on 13 May 1962 and 12 May 1969. The over-winter data set is used here to characterize the transition of Arctic waters from autumn to late-spring-early summer. Minimum temperatures (< -1.8°C) and maximum salinities (>33.2) were reached in late winter and early spring. Oxygen levels declined over the same fall-to-late-spring period and increased markedly in June. Nitrate, phosphate, and silicate concentrations all increased from their lowest values in fall to overall highest values in late spring, after which each nutrient showed evidence of biological uptake. A deep pycnocline, between 50 and 80 m, persisted from November to February, isolating a bottom-water layer that showed evidence of microbially mediated silicate regeneration (silicate concentrations increased, phosphate decreased, and nitrate concentrations were variable). In early spring (19 March to 1 May), nitrate concentrations dropped abruptly at all depths from more than 10 µM to less than 7 µM, apparently in response to the growth of ice algae. Temperature-salinity (T-S) analyses found little evidence of significant water-mass replacements during the study period, but interpretations of coherent variations in nutrient concentrations, as well as observed salinities slightly different from those expected on the basis of ice formation, suggest otherwise. Comparison of results from north of Devon Island with those from sampling off Grise Fiord in May 1962 indicate both higher salinities and lower nutrient concentrations at the latter site; however, data collected at the same site off Grise Fiord in May 1969 showed lower salinities and more variable nutrient concentrations than in 1962. (Au)

D, I, H, G
Algae; Bacteria; Bathymetry; Chemical oceanography; Formation; Hydrography; Measurement; Ocean currents; Ocean temperature; Oxygen; Phytoplankton; Salinity; Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Silicates; Temporal variations; Water masses; Zooplankton

G0815
Devon Island waters, Nunavut; Grise Fiord, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut


The freshwater copepod Limnocalanus macrurus in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago : numbers, weights, and respiration observed from September 1961 - July 1962   /   Apollonio, S.   Saros, J.E.
(Arctic, v. 66, no. 1, Mar. 2013, p. 37-42)
References.
ASTIS record 77496.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic66-1-37.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4264
Libraries: ACU

Numbers, weights, and oxygen consumption of the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus were measured through the winter 1961 - 62 under the ice of Immerk Lake on Devon Island, Arctic Canada. Maximum abundance was 2361 animals per m³ found under ice in mid June, average adult wet weight was 65 µg, and hourly oxygen consumption per adult ranged from 0.26 µg in late summer to 0.03 µg in early winter. The results are compared with results from Char Lake and Resolute Lake on Cornwallis Island, Arctic Canada. The Immerk population was more stable than those at the other lakes, and weights and oxygen consumption appear to be comparable. The seasonal breeding cycle at Immerk Lake was different from that at Char Lake and similar to that at Resolute Lake. A comparison of Immerk Lake data from 1961 - 62 and 1972 - 73 showed almost identical levels of total oxygen metabolism. Immerk Lake copepod oxygen consumption was 6.5% of the total lake metabolism, while that at Char Lake was 6%. These data may assist in future assessment of climate or anthropogenic changes. (Au)

I, J, G, F, E
Animal distribution; Animal population; Animal reproduction; Animal respiration; Climate change; Copepoda; Fresh-water ecology; Lake ice; Lakes; Measurement; Metabolism; Oxygen; Seasonal variations; Size; Snow; Temporal variations; Thickness; Winter ecology

G0813
Char Lake, Nunavut; Immerk Lake, Nunavut; Resolute Lake, Nunavut


Temporal patterns of Arctic and Subarctic zooplankton community composition in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago (1961-62, 1963)   /   Appollonio, S.
(Arctic, v. 66, no. 4, Dec. 2013, p. 463-469, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 78906.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic66-4-463.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic4333
Libraries: ACU

An analysis of overwinter (1961 - 62) and early summer (1963) collections of zooplankton in Jones Sound, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, found 31 life forms and species, of which 11 species of copepods were dominant. The collections are the earliest on record from the archipelago. These 50-year-old data form a historical base that may assist in analyzing impacts of changing patterns of sea ice distributions. Water-mass-diagnostic copepod species in this study varied with the seasons; those with boreal Atlantic-Subarctic water affinities were present in the winter, but absent or few in number in the summer. Those with Arctic Basin water affinities were few or absent in winter but present or found in greater numbers in the summer. These variations in copepod species may be related to varying presence or proportions of boreal Atlantic water or Arctic Basin water in Jones Sound as also suggested by concurrent physical and chemical oceanographic data. The copepod species found in Jones Sound are also present or dominant in comparable Arctic waters from East Greenland to the Beaufort Sea and in the Arctic Basin, as reported elsewhere, and all reports differ significantly in the relative numbers of the species present from season to season or year to year. Such differences within Jones Sound are documented between the data reported here and those from the summer of 1980 reported elsewhere. It is suggested that these variations also reflect the differing presence or proportions of boreal Atlantic and Arctic Basin water. The conclusion is that Jones Sound and other High Arctic waters are subject to the presence or absence of Arctic Basin waters and boreal Atlantic waters and that the composition of the copepod communities is indicative of those changes. (Au)

I, G, V, D, J
Animal collections; Animal distribution; Copepoda; History; Marine ecology; Ocean currents; Oceanography; Sea ice; Seasonal variations; Water masses; Zooplankton

G0815
Jones Sound, Nunavut


Nitrate reductase activities of several High Arctic plant species typically growing on ammonium-dominated soils [Les activités de reductase des nitrates de plusieurs espèces de plantes du Haut-Arctique qui croissent typiquement sur les sols dominés par l'ammonium]   /   Atkin, O.K.   Cummins, W.R.
(Student research in Canada's North : proceedings of the Third National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, October 23-24, 1991 / Edited by W.O. Kupsch and J.F. Basinger. Musk-ox, no. 39, special publication, 1992, p. 214)
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 34141.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

The present study investigates whether high arctic plants have the potential to utilize NO3-, given that NH4+ is the dominant nitrogen source. An "in vivo" assay was used to measure the NO3- reductase activities (NRA) of seven arctic species growing in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. All species exhibited relatively low rates of NRA. This was particularly so for three species (Dryas integrifolia M. Vahl, Saxifraga oppositifolia Linnaeus, Salix arctica Pallas) characteristic of the NO3- deficient beach ridge soils. These species failed to respond to soil supplements of NO3-. This suggests that the lack of available NO3- is not responsible for the very low NRA of these three species. In contrast, supplementation of NO3- to the soil did increase the measured NRA of both leaves and roots of four other species (Cerastium alpinum Linnaeus, Saxifraga cernua Linnaeus, Papaver radicatum Rottb., Oxyria digyna (Linnaeus) Hill) growing on soils dominated by NH4+, but which also contained significant amounts of NO3-. The supply of reductant does not appear to be a limiting factor in any species, as additions of NADH producing metabolites to the assay media failed to increase enzyme activity. It is concluded that these arctic plants have only limited ability to reduce NO3- under field conditions. This in turn suggests that arctic plants in general may be characterized by low activities of this important enzyme. Therefore great care must be taken in attempts to increase the growth and productivity of the tundra. Applications of most commercial fertilizers rich in nitrate would appear to be counterproductive and tundra productivity would be most affected by application of ammonium based fertilizers. (Au)

H, C
Ammonium; Biological productivity; Enzymes; Fertilizers; Leaves; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Roots

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Susceptibility to environmental impact in the Queen Elizabeth Islands   /   Babb, T.A.   Bliss, L.C.
(Arctic, v. 27, no. 3, Sept. 1974, p. 234-237, 1 map (folded))
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 20)
(Canadian Committee for the IBP contribution, no. 291)
References.
ASTIS record 10276.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic27-3-234.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2877
Libraries: ACU

Exploration for oil and gas is proceeding on a rapidly increasing scale in the Queen Elizabeth Islands, and the region needs therefore to be assessed comprehensively in terms of susceptibility of habitat to physical disturbance. ... The evaluation is however necessarily provisional, since only a small part of the total land area has so far been the subject of detailed biological description. Areas likely to be ecologically critical are delimited with the object of assisting governmental and industrial planning. ... Land areas were subdivided into four broad categories based largely on observations made by the present authors. ... The categories are as follows: 1) Polar Desert (31% of land area): susceptibility low .... 2) Polar Semi-desert (25% of land area): susceptibility moderate .... 3) Diverse terrain (22% of land area): susceptibility high in many sites. ... 4) Large meadows (<2% of land area): susceptibility high .... While biological diversity and plant cover are far less in the High Arctic than in the warmer mainland Arctic, there are numerous areas where the land is susceptible to disturbance. The most common forms of degradation are sheet and gully erosion in areas of sparse plant cover, and the softening in summer of slightly disturbed surfaces on moist, fine-grained substrates. This situation contrasts with that in the Low Arctic where removal of vegetation and potential thermokarst are of great concern. In relatively small areas of high plant cover, surfaces have a susceptibility similar to the extensive tundra areas farther south. The biological consequences of disturbance can be much greater, however, not because of deleterious effects on the landscape alone, but because these isolated rich sites comprise the bulk of the energy base for the remainder of the terrestrial food web. (Au)

J, H, I, C, Q

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Effects of physical disturbance on arctic vegetation in the Queen Elizabeth Islands   /   Babb, T.A.   Bliss, L.C.
(Journal of applied ecology, v. 11, no. 2, Aug. 1974, p. 549-562, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 11)
(Canadian Committee for the IBP contribution, no. 258)
References.
ASTIS record 35533.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/2402208
Libraries: ACU

With industrial expansion in the North American arctic, there is increasing need for information on the immediate effects of environmental modification and the long-term capacities of natural systems to recover from disturbance. Because of the relative simplicity of high arctic ecosystems, areas in the extreme north (>73) may be particularly susceptible to damage. As basic ecological information is sparse, a regional approach to the assessment of disturbance was used. A combination of manipulation experiments in the Truelove Lowland on Devon Island and investigations of past disturbance at a number of industrial sites elsewhere in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago was undertaken to gain comprehensive information on the effects of vehicle travel and other types of potential use in a broad range of habitats. Objectives were to determine the effects of physical disturbance and to assess the capacities of natural plant communities for recovery. (Au)

H, C, L
Albedo; Dryas; Environmental impacts; Ground ice; Mosses; Permafrost; Plants (Biology); Revegetation; Sedges; Soil temperature; Thawing; Tundra ecology; Vehicles; Willows

G0813, G0812
Bathurst Island, Nunavut; Eureka, Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands, N.W.T./Nunavut; Sabine Peninsula, N.W.T./Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut; Tuktoyaktuk region, N.W.T.


Mineral nutrient cycling and limitation of plant growth in the Truelove Lowland ecosystem   /   Babb, T.A.   Whitfield, D.W.A.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 589-606
References.
ASTIS record 16671.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The data upon which the following discussions are based include a range of soil, plant, and water analyses supplemental to other aspects of the project. These and concepts developed through the work of other researchers have been incorporated in a framework which, it is hoped, will elucidate the function of nutrient availability within the Truelove Lowland and other high Arctic ecosystems. Included in this chapter are: (1) a discussion of the postulated role of landform and hydrology on mineral nutrition in the Lowland; (2) nitrogen and phosphorus flow schema for the two habitats studied most intensively (the hummocky sedge-moss meadow, "HSM," and the cushion plant-lichens, "CPL," communities); and (3) discussion of possible adaptations and functions of vascular plants and mosses within this system, and general trends in the role of nutrients in the ecosystem's functioning. (Au)

H
Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Plant ecology; Plant growth; Plant nutrition

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


High Arctic disturbance studies associated with the Devon Island Project   /   Babb, T.A.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 647-654, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16673.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Much of the impetus toward a comprehensive study of a high arctic ecosystem was based on the concern that industrial development, particularly gas and oil exploration, was likely to trigger irreversible environmental damage. ... The concept of the Arctic as an "extreme" environment, imposing stress at all but the best of times, leads to the notion that very little additional stress is needed to surpass the tolerance limits of organisms. Sensitivity must therefore be anticipated if damage is to be avoided. Direct examination of some of the effects of human encroachment was thus incorporated as a part of the Devon Island Study. It is the purpose of this chapter to discuss in general terms some of the aspects of industrial activity likely to contribute to habitat degradation. (Au)

J, S, A, L, Q
Environmental impacts; Erosion; Land use; Off-road transportation; Oil spills on land; Plant succession; Reclamation; Water pollution

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island programs, 1965   /   Barr, W.   Koerner, R.M.
(Arctic, v. 19, no. 2, June 1966, p. 201-204, map)
ASTIS record 55194.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic19-2-201.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3426
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute of North America has made available for future research the facilities left by the Devon Island Expedition of 1960-63. These facilities consist of four Jamesway huts equipped to support research workers at the base, two Massey Ferguson tractors, one weasel and a large range of equipment designed to outfit scientists working in the field away from the base camp. In 1965, taking advantage of these facilities, two scientific programs were followed. The first, in geomorphology, was essentially a base-camp-oriented project run by two men. The second, in glaciology, was a field-oriented program run by two men and one woman working on the ice cap and three outlet valley glaciers. The geomorphology program was supported entirely by the Arctic Institute of North America. The glaciology program received financial support from the Arctic Institute of North America, U.S. Army Natick Laboratories, and the Royal Geographical Society. ... (Au)

F, A, C

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island programs, 1966   /   Barr, W.   Brooke, R.C.   Hussell, D.J.T.   King, R.H.   Koerner, R.M.
(Arctic, v. 20, no. 1, Mar. 1967, p. 44-49, map)
ASTIS record 55201.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic20-1-44.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3277
Libraries: ACU

Five field parties availed themselves of the facilities at the Arctic Institute's Base Camp on Devon Island during the 1966 field season. Each party consisted of two men (or in the case of the glaciology party, one man and one woman). The general areas of study were glaciology, botany, ornithology, periglacial geomorphology, and glacioisostatic geomorphology. A base-camp staff of three, including two Boy Scouts, provided a valuable service in maintaining the Base Camp, and in assisting the various field parties as required. The first party flew to Devon Island from Resolute Bay on 11 June, and the remainder followed on 16 and 29 June. Some of the party left Devon Island by air on 13 August, while the remainder were evacuated by the icebreaker John A. Macdonald on 29 August. Transport to and from Devon Island was greatly simplified through the kind assistance of Dr. F. Roots of the Polar Continental Shelf Project; whenever weather and the needs of his own project permitted, he made every effort to assist in the movement of equipment and personnel to and from Devon Island. ... (Au)

F, A, C, H, I, E

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island programs, 1967   /   Barr, W.   Barrett, P.E.   Hussell, D.J.T.   King, R.H.   Koerner, R.M.
(Arctic, v. 21, no. 1, Mar. 1968, p. 44-50)
References.
ASTIS record 55097.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic21-1-44.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3248
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute's facilities on Devon Island were again used during the summer of 1967 by field parties studying glaciology, glacio-isostatic geomorphology, periglacial geomorphology, ornithology, and botany. In addition, an expedition photographer recorded the summer's activities with still photographs and on 16 mm. colour film. Field camps were established at various locations and the studies were pursued from these as well as from the Base Camp close to Cape Sparbo. ... (Au)

F, A, I, H, E, C

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Postglacial isostatic movement in northeastern Devon Island : a reappraisal   /   Barr, W.
(Arctic, v. 24, no. 4, Dec. 1971, p. 249-268, ill., figures, map, tables)
ASTIS record 10160.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic24-4-249.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3140
Libraries: ACU

Amended emergence and uplift curves are presented for the Truelove Inlet area. The new curves are based mainly on radiocarbon dates from whalebone, driftwood and basal peat. The marine limit lies at 76 m a.s.l., and dates to approximately 9450 BP, which is also considered to be the date of deglaciation; total postglacial uplift is 107 m. The rate of uplift during the first thousand years following deglaciation reached 4.05 m per century, which is markedly less rapid than was previously reported. The rate of uplift decreased steadily thereafter and, at present, appears to be matched by eustatic sea level rise. What had appeared to be fossil evidence of restrained rebound at the onset of uplift was probably due to accidental mixing during collection of interstadial shells with postglacial shells. The total amount of postglacial uplift, and the rates of uplift, have probably been somewhat suppressed by the close proximity of the Devon Island Ice Cap. (Au)

A, D

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Preliminary observations of off-road vehicle disturbance to sedge meadow tundra at a coastal lowland location, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Barrett, P.
Ottawa : DIAND, 1975.
v, 34 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(ALUR, 73-74- 71)
(North of 60)
References.
ASTIS record 18818.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This report describes the results of research carried out during the summer of 1973 on the Truelove Lowland of Devon Island, N.W.T. The work was undertaken as a part of the Arctic Land Use Research Programme of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. The broad objective of the research was to obtain quantitative information on the disturbance effects of tracked vehicles to damage-susceptible meadow terrain in a high arctic locality. ... The aim of this study was to provide data which might be utilized as a basis of comparison with these locations and also to determine if basic ecological processes, such as response to disturbance and recolonization, differ in any substantial way from those of low arctic regions. (Au)

L, H
All-terrain vehicles; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Interaction of bryophytes and thermal cracking in the genesis of hummock and string-like microtopography in High Arctic tundra meadows   /   Barrett, P.
(Polarforschung, bd. 49, heft 1, 1979, p. 70-79, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 5932.
Languages: English
Web: http://epic.awi.de/Publications/Polarforsch1979_1_7.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Observations of hummock and string-like microrelief features were made in High Arctic hydric meadows. Thermal shearing of thick bryophyte mats, and subsequent roll back during spring flooding, appears to be one way in which this topography is formed. Hummocky and non-hummocky (flat) meadows show distinct floristic differences which may in part be due to observed differences in temperature, nutrient concentrations and moisture relations. (Au)

C, H, A
Bryophytes; Hummocks; Meadows; Topography; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island programs, 1968   /   Barrett, P.E.   Hussell, D.J.T.   Whillans, I.M.
(Arctic, v. 22, no. 2, June 1969, p. 158-160)
Reference.
ASTIS record 55099.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic22-2-158.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3206
Libraries: ACU

Four field parties, studying glaciology, botany and ornithology, used the Arctic Institute's facilities on Devon Island during the summer of 1968. The botanical and ornithological studies were carried out from the Base Camp near Cape Sparbo, while the glaciological work was pursued from field camps on the ice cap and the Sverdrup Glacier. ... (Au)

F, A, I, H, E, B, C

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Vascular plants of the Truelove Inlet region, Devon Island   /   Barrett, P.E.   Teeri, J.A.
(Arctic, v. 26, no. 1, Mar. 1973, p. 58-67, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 10212.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic26-1-58.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2896
Libraries: ACU

Ninety-three species of vascular plants are recorded from a 16 sq. mile coastal lowland on the northern coast of Devon Island, Northwest Territories. The following taxa are apparently new records for Devon Island: Cystopteris fragilis, Woodsia alpina, Equisetum variegatum, Poa alpigena, Carex amblyorhyncha, Draba oblongata, Saxifraga tenuis, Epilobium arcticum, Hippuris vulgaris, Pedicularis lanata, Puccinellia vaginata var. paradoxa. These additions bring the total known flora of Devon Island to 115 species. The Truelove flora is part of the High Arctic biogeographic element of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. However, a distinct element of species of more southerly distribution is present probably due to the moderating influence of the lowland environment. (Au)

H

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Disturbance and the successional response of arctic plants on polar desert habitats   /   Barrett, P.E.   Schulten, R.
(Arctic, v. 28, no. 1, Mar. 1975, p. 70-73, ill., tables)
ASTIS record 10292.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic28-1-70.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2815
Libraries: ACU

... The present authors have observed during several summer seasons disturbance-induced succession on the Truelove Lowland of Devon Island (76 N) in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In this paper are presented the results of observations of the successional response of three vascular plant species on polar desert microenvironments subjected to vehicle disturbance. The study area is a post-Pleistocene strand flat on the northeast coast of Devon Island. A pronounced series of raised beaches are in evidence from the present coastline inland to the upper marine limit. These relict beaches provide microsites of polar desert conditions in the midst of a landscape dominated chiefly by hydric tundra meadows. As such they represent the xeric portion of a typical arctic "mesotopographic gradient" .... The present writers interpret the plant communities established on these sites to be in equilibrium with the present environment and thus represent climax plant communities. ... The values for total plant cover on the vehicle-disturbed pavement are, not unexpectedly, drastically reduced. More interesting, however, are comparisons of the three species in recolonization. The two species found most commonly in undisturbed communities show quite distinctive responses following disturbance. Saxifraga oppositifolia seedlings yielded counts similar to those for undisturbed terrain. Further, in the majority of quadrats on disturbed areas Minuartia rubella was now the major contributor to the total vascular plant cover. Saxifraga oppositifola while prominent numerically was represented chiefly by smaller seedlings and thus contributed substantially less to cover values. Similar results were also obtained on small quadrats artificially denuded of all vegetation in 1969 .... Counts of individuals on four quadrants showed the presence of a number of invading Minuartia rubella seedlings and occasional Saxifraga oppositifolia, but after four years all plots still lacked Dryas integrifolia. ... Observations made during the present study indicate that, for these habitats at least, important shifts in the numerical relationships between species occur following vehicle disturbance (and subsequent reduction in community diversity). The sharp increases in populations of Minuartia rubella and the distinctive recolonization rates of Saxifraga oppositifolia and Dryas integrifolia populations may be easily viewed as disturbance-induced succession. The causal reasons for these population responses are not known. All three species appear to produce substantial amounts of seed in the field. These observations do serve to emphasize, however, that our present understanding of the population dynamics of Arctic tundra plants may be inadequate for predictive purposes. It is unlikely, for example, that in selecting native plants for restoring vegetation on disturbed xeric tundra Minuartia rubella would have been favoured over Dryas integrifolia if we were to rely solely on our observations of the two species in undisturbed communities. The study of responses of vegetation to current land manipulations in the Arctic may provide valuable clues to the understanding of the successional process in this region. It is the authors' belief that existing data on succession in tundra in the High Arctic are inadequate for the long-range planning of land use in many tundra habitats, and that greater emphasis should be directed towards this problem in the future. (Au)

H, F, L, J
Polar deserts

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Lichens from a High Arctic coastal lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Barrett, P.E.   Thomson, J.W.
(The Bryologist, v. 78, no. 2, Summer 1975, p. 160-167, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 27)
References.
ASTIS record 38908.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

One hundred eighty-two lichen taxa are reported from a coastal lowland area on Devon Island, N.W.T. One hundred thirty-two of these are reported from the island for the first time. The comparatively rich lichen flora in this limited area is attributed to the wide diversity of habitats available within the lowland system. (Au)

H, J
Beaches; Lichens; Plant collections; Plant distribution; Plant ecology; Plant taxonomy

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Northern Heritage Research Project = Programme de recherche sur le patrimoine du Nord   /   Bertulli, M.
(Inuktitut (English, Inuktitut and French ed.), no. 62, Winter 1985, p. 51-54, ill.)
ASTIS record 10903.
Languages: English, French and Inuktitut
Libraries: ACU

For one month each summer for the past seven years, young people from the Northwest Territories have been given a unique opportunity to participate in a scientific research and field school program which stresses the importance and preservation of the cultural and natural heritage of the North. It is called the Northern Heritage Research Project (NHRP). Participants study and assist scientists working on research projects in the disciplines of arctic archaeology, ecology and geography. ... (Au)

T, R
Archaeology; Northern Heritage Research Project; Northern Heritage Society; Occupational training; Research personnel

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Northern Heritage Research Project on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, High Arctic : annual report of the Northern Heritage Society, 1984   /   Bertulli, M.M.   Strahlendorf, P.W.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Northern Heritage Society, 1984.
vi, 103 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 45811.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The archaeological resources of the Lowland have been surveyed and tested over the past three field seasons by James Helmer, University of Calgary. He has stated three research objectives: i) the "changing seasonal subsistence/settlement strategies amongst the indigenous prehistoric populations of the Central Arctic archipelago" ...; ii) the "effect of Holocene climatic fluctuations on prehistoric cultural adaptations"; and iii) "the early Arctic Small Tool tradition (ASTt) and early Thule occupations of the High Arctic" .... The 1984 NCRP began excavation of a small but productive site, QkHn-12, on the north coast of the Lowland. The site has the potential to contribute data toward each of these three major study objectives. The responsibilities of site excavation, interpretations, and report production, as well as developing future research directions lie with the NHS, although the co-operation and assistance of Dr. Helmer are gratefully acknowledged. A preliminary analysis of the data recovered during the 1984 field season appears in this report. (Au)

R, U, J, A, H, E, I, T
Archaeology; Arctic Small Tool tradition; Birds; Curricula; Ecology; Education; Geography; Human ecology; Inuit languages; Microclimatology; Northern Heritage Society; Plants (Biology); Public relations; Research; Research stations; Thule culture; Traditional knowledge; Water quality; Zoology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Excavations at PkHn-12 and PkHn-11, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, NWT, 1985   /   Bertulli, M.M.
[S.l.] : Northern Heritage Society, 1988.
20 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
References.
ASTIS record 45767.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... This work has been conducted by the Devon Island Archaeology Project under the direction of Dr. James Helmer, University of Calgary. The research objectives of this project are to acquire data which will contribute to a model of early Palaeo-Eskimo subsistence and settlement patterns, and material culture in the region. During the summer of 1984 and 1985, two sites on the north coast of Truelove Lowland were excavated under my direction as part of the curriculum of the Northern Heritage Research Project, an arctic science field school for native northerners operated by the Northern Heritage Society, Yellowknife, NWT. Information gained from these sites will contribute to the broad, theoretical questions of the Devon Island Archaeology Project. QkHn-12 and QkHn-11 are small sites, covering an area of only 4200 m² and 700 m², respectively. The former bears evidence of Pre-Dorset and Thule occupations while the latter is Pre-Dorset. When occupied prehistorically, the area was an emergent gravel beach; due to local conditions favourable to vegetation growth, much of the site area of QkHn-12, both Pre-Dorset and Thule localities, are now covered by fairly lush arctic plant growth and humic soils. Many features, such as Pre-Dorset tent rings, are only minimally visible on the surface and several totally buried features were located in the excavation of sampling units. Thirteen features on QkHn-12 and two on QkHn-11 have been delineated. The two sites are almost contiguous, separated by a low boulder outcrop and a shallow pond, the size of which has varied considerably in the two seasons of field work due to widely varying amounts of precipation. Despite the separate Borden numbers, the sites form a cultural unit and are not discussed separately. ... [Site features, methods, excavation and artifacts are described.] (Au)

U
Artifacts; Bones; Inuit archaeology; Mammals; Pre-Dorset culture; Thule culture

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


A survey of mycorrhizal plants on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Bledsoe, C.   Klein, P.   Bliss, L.C.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 68, no. 9, Sept. 1990, p.1848-1856, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 43477.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b90-242
Libraries: ACU

Although mycorrhizal associations are commonly found on roots of most plant species, little is known about the presence or absence of mycorrhizae in arctic regions. In the Canadian High Arctic, roots of 55 herbaceous and woody plant species were examined for mycorrhizae during the summers of 1987 and 1988 on Devon Island, N.W.T. Ectomycorrhizal associations were found on roots of Salix arctica, Dryas integrifolia, and Potentilla hyparctica; ericoid mycorrhizae formed on Cassiope tetragona and Vaccinium uliginosum, Ectomycorrhizal roots were often covered with black hyphae resembling the fungus Cenococcum geophilum; sclerotia characteristic of this fungus were found in soil extracts. Plants expected to have endomycorrhizal associations were apparently nonmycorrhizal in the traditional sense, since no arbuscules, vesicles, or pelotons were found on any roots during two field seasons. Although extensive fungal hyphae were often present on and within roots, these hyphae could not be conclusively identified as endomycorrhizal. Some dark, septate hyphae were present; their function, although unknown, may be beneficial to the host. In a series of greenhouse bioassays using arctic soils, no endomycorrhizal associations developed on test plants. Spores of vesicular-arbuscular fungi were not found in soil extracts. Thus in this survey, only ectomycorrhizal associations were observed, suggesting that the cold, dry winter and cold, wet summer climates in this area of the High Arctic severely limit formation of endomycorrhizae. (Au)

H, E
Effects of climate on plants; Mycorhizal fungi; Roots

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island Programs, 1970   /   Bliss, L.
(Arctic, v. 24, no. 1, Mar. 1971, p. 65-67)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 2)
ASTIS record 53534.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic24-1-65.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3115
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic Institute's research base on Devon Island was used by over twenty-five investigators and their field assistants during the 1970 summer field season, from late April to mid-September. There were two separately directed, but related, programs. One, a large integrated ecosystem study, was directed by L.C. Bliss of the University of Alberta and sponsored by the Canadian International Biological Program (IBP); the other was an Arctic Institute-sponsored comparative ecology project, under the direction of James A. Teeri. Substantial improvements were made to the Base Camp (located in the Truelove Lowland), and a total of 8 Parkall and Jamesway huts are now available as sleeping quarters, laboratories, warehouse, kitchen, and storage areas. In addition, a separate field camp was established about 8 km east of the base to facilitate the study of muskox, fox, and weasel. Local transportation was by two skidoo motorboggans, a double-tracked Ranger V vehicle and trailer, and a Massey-Ferguson tractor and trailer. Transportation between Resolute and the Base Camp was by Otter and Beaver aircraft. ... (Au)

J, A, E, H, I

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


IBP High Arctic ecosystem study, Devon Island   /   Bliss, L.C.
(Arctic, v. 25, no. 2, June 1972, p. 158-161)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 3)
ASTIS record 10187.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic25-2-158.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2958
Libraries: ACU

The research in 1971 continued to emphasize the physical environment and the biological response of organisms on meadows (c. 49 per cent of the lowland) and raised beach ridges (c. 15 percent of the lowland) in the Truelove Lowland. The lakes (22 percent) were not included in the studies and all data are expressed on the basis of a 3,300 ha land area. As in 1970, the research was concentrated on a typical mesic meadow (soils, meteorology, primary production, nitrogen fixation, invertebrates, decomposition) with additional data gathered in 2 to 5 other meadows (extensive sites), depending upon the research unit. The intensive beach ridge site, approximately 7,500 years old, was studied with the same components of research as the master meadow site. In addition, 2 to 11 other beach ridges (extensive sites), and a site on the plateau (c. 300 m. above sea level) were studied in varying detail (soils, meteorology, primary production, and invertebrates). In all, 22 separate research projects were conducted in 1971. Two flights for aerial photography of the Truelove Lowland were made. The Atmospheric Environmental Service of the Department of Transport photographed black and white and an infrared scan in late July, and the Inland Waters Branch photographed black and white imagery at 3,330 and 830 m and infrared false colour at 1,660 m in mid-August. ... (Au)

J, I, H, C, E, A

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic tundra ecosystems   /   Bliss, L.C.   Courtin, G.M.   Pattie, D.L.   Riewe, R.R.   Whitfield, D.W.A.   Widden, P.
(Annual review of ecology and systematics, v. 4, 1973, p. 359-399)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 10)
References.
ASTIS record 35535.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1146/annurev.es.04.110173.002043
Libraries: ACU

... Interest in arctic ecosystems has greatly increased in the past five years with the discovery of oil, gas, and minerals in the North American Arctic. Interest in arctic and subarctic regions of the USSR has existed for a longer period of time, stemming from problems of aforestation, limited crop production, the sustained yield of reindeer, fur bearers, and waterfowl, and basic ecologic and taxonomic surveys (124). There is value in understanding the world's ecosystems, but of greater importance is their long-range management. Within terrestrial arctic systems there is a need to manage vegetation, both as a thermal barrier to permafrost melt and as animal habitat, as well as management of wildlife populations. Only when portions of a system are stressed, and through field and laboratory studies and computer modeling, will we learn the limits of human and natural perturbations. To date most of the literature deals with information on ecosystem structure and function with only limited data on perturbation. The objective of this paper is to review our knowledge on how these heat-limited terrestrial systems function. The role and impact of both native and Euro-North American peoples in these northern systems is discussed. ... (Au)

J, E, C, H
Albedo; Atmospheric circulation; Birds; Environmental protection; Furbearing animals; Hunting; Inuit; Microorganisms; Permafrost; Plants (Biology); Polar bears; Primary production (Biology); Solar radiation; Thermal protection of permafrost; Tundra ecology; Ungulates; Wildlife management

G02, G081, G0813
Arctic regions; Canadian Arctic; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island, Canada   /   Bliss, L.C.
(Structure and function of tundra ecosystems / [Edited by] T. Rosswall and O.W. Heal. Ecological bulletins, no. 20, p. 17-60, ill., tables, map)
Bibliography : p.57-60.
ASTIS record 892.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... Following the systematic inspection of a series of meadows and raised beaches, a representative of each was selected and designated as the Intensive Study Site. ... The intensive research program of meteorology, soils, energy and water flux, plant production, photosynthesis, invertebrates, decomposition and soil microbiology, and surface manipulation were all established within the intensive meadow and raised beach sites. ... (Au)

J
Animal ecology; Climatology; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem   /   Bliss, L.C. [Editor]   International Biological Programme. Canadian Committee. Devon Island Project
Edmonton : University of Alberta Press, [c1977].
xxi, 714 p. : ill., maps, photos. ; 24 cm.
(APOA project no. 55 : Arctic environmental research 1973 (Devon Island IBP project). Report)
ISBN 0-88864-014-5, 0-88864-121-4
Appendices: 1. Administrative summary / L.C. Bliss. - 2. Remote sensing and aerial photography of Truelove Lowland / G.M. Courtin. - 3. Lichens of Truelove Lowland / D.H.S. Richardson. - 4. Fungi of Truelove Lowland / T. Booth and P. Widden. - 5. Musci of the northern lowlands of Devon Island / D.H. Vitt. - 6. Vascular plants of Truelove Lowland and adjacent areas including their relative importance / L.C. Bliss. - 7. Invertebrates of Truelove Lowland / J. Ryan. - 8. Birds and mammals of Truelove Lowland / D.L. Pattie.
References.
First paperback edition printed in 1987.
ASTIS record 2992.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU NFSMO

... The book is organized into sections dealing with the various categories of research. The abiotic components are studied first: micrometeorological studies are included in this section. The vegetation is dealt with next with the following papers on the primary producers: lowland sedge moss communities, cushion plant communities, dwarf shrub communities, bryophyte vegetation, and lichens. Further papers are devoted to the primary production processes: evapotranspiration, biological nitrogen fixation, and photosynthesis. There are five papers each on the invertebrate and vertebrate consumers, and three on microbiology and decomposition. The book concludes with papers on the limnology of three lakes, on ecosystem models, the Inuit, and industrial development. (Au)

J, H, I
Animal ecology; Evaporation; Fresh-water biology; Geology; Hydrology; Inuit; Invertebrates; Meteorology; Microorganisms; Permafrost; Plants (Biology); Primary production (Biology); Soils; Subsistence; Tundra ecology; Vertebrates

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Jones Sound region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Primary production of dwarf shrub heath communities, Truelove Lowland   /   Bliss, L.C.   Kerik, J.   Peterson, W.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 217-224
References.
ASTIS record 16640.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... Within the High Arctic, dwarf shrub heath with two or more heath species [within the Ericaceae or closely related families] are largely restricted to the southern islands. North of 74 N, Cassiope tetragona is the only heath species that provides much cover or production although Vaccinium uliginosum may be present in small amounts. In general, this community type is highly restricted to snowbank sites, and within a landscape they seldom occupy more than 1% to 3% of the area. Within Truelove Lowland, because of granitic rock outcrops with snowbanks that do not melt until early July, this community was better represented (ca. 70% of the vegetation within the outcrops which occupy 12.4% of the Lowland). The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe the plant communities present; (2) to determine alive standing crop and net annual production within the heath communities; an (3) to gather data on the plant phenology and plant growth of Cassiope tetragona. Field work was conducted in 1972 by Kerik, and in 1973 by Bliss and Peterson. (Au)

H
Effects of climate on plants; Plants (Biology); Primary production (Biology); Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


General summary Truelove Lowland ecosystem   /   Bliss, L.C.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 657-675, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16674.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... It is the purpose of this final chapter to highlight some of the major integrative findings of this study, to relate these findings to general ecosystem function in the High Arctic, and to discuss their implications for land use management. (Au)

J, S
Animal distribution; Energy budgets; Land use; Plant nutrition; Primary production (Biology); Tundra ecology

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Polar deserts, their plant cover and plant production in the Canadian High Arctic   /   Bliss, L.C.   Svoboda, J.   Bliss, D.I.
(Holarctic ecology, v. 7, no. 3, Sept. 1984, p. 305-324, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 15674.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1600-0587.1984.tb01136.x
Libraries: ACU

A total of 41 stands was sampled for species composition and 29 of these stands for plant standing crop and net annual production at 7 sites on 6 arctic islands. Fourteen additional sites on 10 islands were studied in less detail. Through polar ordination, three groupings were recognized: polar barrens with an average species richness of 6, a phytomass of 24 gm/m², and a net annual production of .8 g/m². Comparable data for the cushion plant and snowflush communities were 9, 120, 3 and 13 species, 400 g/m², phytomass and 41 g/m² net production respectively. Cryptograms are minor except within showflush communities. The soils show no horizon development, are alkaline, and are very low in organic matter, nitrogen, and phosphorus. It is believed that the combination of limited soil moisture in mid-summer and very low nutrient levels are the primary reason for such low plant cover and plant production in these predominantly polar barren landscapes. Geologic substrate with an abundance of frost-shattered rock and topographic position are factors that control the limited availability of water. (Au)

H, J
Plant cover; Plant ecology; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Primary production (Biology); Tundra ecology

G0813
Bathurst Island, Nunavut; Canadian Arctic Islands; Cornwallis Island, Nunavut; King Christian Island, Nunavut; Prince of Wales Island, Nunavut; Somerset Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Plant communities and plant production in the western Queen Elizabeth Islands   /   Bliss, L.C.   Svoboda, J.
(Holarctic ecology, v. 7, no. 3, Sept. 1984, p. 325-344, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 15675.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1600-0587.1984.tb01137.x
Libraries: ACU

A study of soils, plant communities, and net annual plant production was conducted with 41 stands at 3 sites on 3 arctic islands. Twelve additional sites were studied in less detail on Ellef Ringes, King Christian and Melville islands and on four other islands. Through polar ordination five groupings were recognized. Alopecurus and Puccinellia barrens on sand to silty soils and on silty soils, high in sodium salts respectively. Species richness averaged 2.6 ±2.0 and total plant cover 6.8 ±2.7%. The Phippsia barrens occur on sheet eroded surfaces and in gulleys with deep winter snow. Species richness was 9.8 ±5.0 and total plant cover 14.8 ±9.6%. The graminoid steppes on sandy soils averaged 7.6 ±2.4 species and total plant cover 40.0 ±2.8%. Eight stands were dominated by moss-graminoids, mostly on loam soils. Species richness was 24.9 ±3.4 and total plant cover 77.7 ±16.1%. Plant production was 8.0 gm/m² in a Puccinellia barren and 9.4 gm/m² in a Luzula confusa graminoid steppe. Net annual production ranged from 18.8 to 58.7 in 6 other stands. The 13 stands within the cryptogram-herb community complex occur on sandy loam to clay-loam soils. Species richness averaged 26.3 ±6.2 and total plant cover 61.2 ±24.7%. Mosses and lichens play a significant role in the establishment and maintenance of communities with a greater species richness and plant production of vascular plant species. The ability of mosses to hold moisture and the presence of limited bluegreen algae that fix nitrogen appear essential to the maintenance of greater species richness, plant cover and plant production compared with the barren polar deserts that are often nearby. (Au)

H, J, C
Meadows; Plant cover; Plant ecology; Plant-soil relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar semi-deserts; Primary production (Biology); Soils; Tundra ecology

G0813, G0812
Canadian Arctic Islands; Ellef Ringnes Island, Nunavut; King Christian Island, Nunavut; Melville Island, N.W.T./Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic ecosystems : their structure, function and herbivore carrying capacity   /   Bliss, L.C.
In: Grazing research at northern latitudes / Edited by Olafur Gudmundsson. - [S.l.] : Plenum Publishing Corp., 1986, p. 5-25, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 33787.
Languages: English

The structure and function of arctic ecosystems have many similarities with those of cool temperate grasslands. Ecosystems in both biomes are characterized by graminoid and shrub species, although shrubs are more characteristic of the Low Arctic. Ecosystems within these biomes have evolved in stressful environments, grasslands with unpredictable periods of drought and an excess of summer heat. Many tundras have a surplus of water, but unpredictable short periods of summer heat; both sets of stresses greatly limit carbon gain. Temperate grasslands are characterized by an abundance of invertebrates, especially herbivorous insects aboveground and herbivorous nematodes belowground. Invertebrates are abundant in the Arctic but relatively few of them are herbivores, especially aboveground; saprovores are abundant in both. Small and large mammals are also characteristic of both biomes. Major differences include the much greater nutrient content and neutral pH of the soils, and low levels of organic matter accumulation in the grasslands of North America. Within most arctic ecosystems there is a low nutrient regime, acid soils, and high levels of carbon accumulation, especially those systems that support large herbivores. Within both biomes large herbivores have historically been an important food source for people. The objectives of this paper are to describe arctic ecosystems and to discuss their ability to produce large herbivores. (Au)

H, I, J
Birds; Carbon cycling; Caribou; Geese; Grasses; Grazing; Invertebrates; Lemmings; Meadows; Moose; Mosses; Muskoxen; Nematoda; Nitrogen cycling; Plant ecology; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Primary production (Biology); Ptarmigan; Sedges; Shrubs; Soils; Tundra ecology; Weasels

G0813, G06
Barrow, Point, Alaska; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic tundra and polar desert biome   /   Bliss, L.C.
In: North American terrestrial vegetation / Edited by M.G. Barbour and W.D. Billings. - Cambridge, England : Cambridge University Press, 1988, ch. 1, p. 1-32, ill., maps
References.
ASTIS record 33790.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Arctic is often viewed as a monotonous landscape with a limited number of vascular plants and an abundance of cryptogams. In reality, the arctic tundra and polar desert biome is as diverse in its vegetation types and soils as are the grassland biome and the coniferous biomes of western mountains and the taiga. The Arctic constitutes about 20% of North America, about 2.5 million km² in Canada, 2.0 million km² in Greenland, and 0.3 million km² in Alaska. Over this large area there are considerable variations in climate, ice cover, soils, sizes of the flora (cryptogam and vascular), and plant communities. As used here, "Arctic" refers to those areas beyond the climatic limit of the boreal forest and treeline. There often are small pockets of trees, usually Picea glauca, in protected mesohabitats (south-facing slopes, river terraces) beyond the treeline, but the uplands are dominated by arctic tundra vegetation. Throughout these cold-dominated landscapes, soils are permanently frozen (permafrost), with only the upper portion (20-60 cm, but 100-200 cm along rivers) thawing in summer, the active layer. The Circumpolar Arctic is divided into the Low Arctic and High Arctic based on many ecological characteristics. Tundras predominate in the Low Arctic, whereas polar semideserts and polar deserts dominate the High Arctic. "Tundra" is a generic term that includes vegetation types that range from tall shrub (2-5 m high) to dwarf shrub heath (5-20 cm high) and graminoids and mosses. These landscapes have a total plant cover of 80-100%, including an abundance of cryptogams in most sites. (Au)

H, J, E, C
Active layer; Effects of climate on plants; Frozen ground; Meteorology; Patterned ground; Permafrost; Pingos; Plant cover; Plant growth; Plant reproduction; Plant succession; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Primary production (Biology); Soils; Tundra ecology

G02, G0813, G06
Alaska, Northern; Barrow, Point, Alaska; North American Arctic; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Ecosystem development in a coastal lowland of the Canadian High Arctic   /   Bliss, L.C.   Chapin, D.M.   Leggett, A.S.   Lennihan, R.   Dickson, L.G.   Bledsoe, C.   Bledsoe, L.S.
In: Arctic research : advances and prospects / Edited by V.M. Kotlyakov and V.E. Sokolov. - Moscow : Institute of Geography, 1990, part 2, p. 165-174, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 33786.
Languages: English

The development of coastal ecosystems with relatively abundant vegetation is dependent upon an abundance of surface water much of the summer. In these locations the cyanobacteria become established either on bare soil or upon masses of marine algae that wash into shallow lagoons. Grasses and sedges invade these lands as soils slowly develop and where they remain moist to wet most of the summer. In areas where drainage is greater, soils are shallow and the plant communities do not develop beyond a cover of terrestrial algae, lichens and moss or rosette cushion plants with mosses and lichens. Therefore there is a mosaic pattern of plant communities and different patterns of plant succession depending upon topographic position, winter snow cover, water and nutrient regimes, and the abundance of cyanobacteria. In all of these habitats the cyanobacteria play a significant role in soil formation and the dominant role in nitrogen fixation. Without these organisms fixing nitrogen in these moist to wet habitats, high arctic ecosystems would be more like the limited flora and biomass of the polar deserts. (Au)

H, C, J
Algae; Biomass; Cyanophyceae; Formation; Grasses; Lichens; Mosses; Nitrogen cycling; Plant ecology; Plant nutrition; Plant succession; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Sedges; Soils; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The patterning of plant communities and edaphic factors along a High Arctic coastline : implications for succession   /   Bliss, L.C.   Gold, W.G.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 72, no. 8, Aug. 1994, p.1095-1107, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 55865.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b94-134
Libraries: ACU

Isostatic rebound and the periodic development of ice-push beach ridges have created topography suitable for development of biologically rich polar oases along the northeast coast of Devon Island, Canada. Distinct patterning of both plant communities and edaphic factors from coastal shoreline areas inland indicate primary succession with a directional species replacement. At Rocky Point (emergent <2000 BP) biological development along the shore is initiated by marine algae that are invaded by cyanobacteria. These organic mats are colonized by Puccinellia on the shoreline of these brackish lagoons. Where the topography grades upslope, via concave areas, the toposequence from Puccinellia proceeds through Dupontia to Carex to Salix hummocks to cushion plant-lichen communities. In drier, convex areas Puccinellia proceeds through rosette-herb hummocks to cushion plant-lichen communities as a toposequence. Reduced levels of salinity and of nitrogen fixation upslope (from the shore) along with increased depth of organic soils and ability of soils to hold more soil water appear important in the conversion of Puccinellia- to Dupontia- to Carex-dominated meadows. This is the major chronosequence at Rocky Point and it is these Carex meadows that occupy most of the wetlands of Truelove Lowland. The Salix hummocks and cushion plant-lichen communities of all drier habitats resemble communities of similar species composition on the beach ridges of the lowland. (Au)

H, A, E, J, B, C
Algae; Beaches; Bryophytes; Coast changes; Electrical properties; Geomorphology; Granite; Lichens; Limestone; Meadows; Nitrogen cycling; Plant distribution; Plant growth; Plant reproduction; Plant succession; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Salinity; Sea level; Sedges; Sediments (Geology); Shorelines; Soil moisture; Soil pH; Soils; Solar radiation; Topography; Tundra ecology; Wetlands; Willows

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Patterns of plant distribution within two polar desert landscapes   /   Bliss, L.C.   Henry, G.H.R.   Svoboda, J.   Bliss, D.I.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 26, no. 1, Feb. 1994, p. 46-55, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 59651.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1551876
Libraries: ACU

Although most polar deserts are biologically very barren, there are exceptions. To determine the general pattern of plant distribution from an ice cap to the lower edge of a plateau, two transects were sampled, one each 500 to 720 m above Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island and 350 to 385 m above Truelove Lowland. Devon Island. Where soil surfaces are moist much of the summer, there is a greater floristic richness, a greater percent cover of cryptogams and vascular species, and the development of a cryptogamic crust on both dolomite and granite-derived soils. In addition, the degree of soil churning, the coarseness and type of substrate, and soil nutrient levels are important at the local scale. The limited data indicate that temperatures are higher at these locations than one would expect from normal lapse rates. The sporadic presence of two or three woody species at 350 to 550 m is further indication of relatively mild conditions compared with most polar desert landscapes at these latitudes where woody species are absent. (Au)

H, A, B, C, F
Cyanophyceae; Effects of temperature on plants; Frost boils; Geology; Meteorology; Patterned ground; Plant cover; Plant distribution; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Sediments (Geology); Slopes; Snowmelt; Soil erosion; Soil moisture; Soil surveys; Soil temperature; Soils; Stratigraphy

G0813
Alexandra Fiord region, Nunavut; Bache Peninsula, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Vascular plant reproduction, establishment, and growth and the effects of cryptogamic crusts within a polar desert ecosystem, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Bliss, L.C.   Gold, W.G.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 77, no. 5, May 1999, p. 623-636, 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 47292.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/cjb-77-5-623
Libraries: ACU

Most of the ice-free lands within the Canadian High Arctic are classified as polar desert (44%) or semidesert (49%). Much of this desert landscape supports no more than 6-10 vascular species that provide 1-3% cover and cryptogamic organisms that occupy 0-5% cover on the soil surface. The barrenness of these lands results from a short growing season and low summer temperatures that limit plant growth and the production of viable seeds. Limited areas have a 50-80% cover of cryptogamic crust and an 8-12% cover of vascular plants. These are areas in which surfaces remain moist for considerable periods in summer from snowflush waters. Where such cryptogamic soil crusts develop, they play a central role in soil development and nitrogen fixation. The two major components of this study were (i) an examination of fundamental reproductive, establishment, and growth characteristics of polar desert plants in the field and (ii) the relationship of these characteristics to environmental conditions in areas with and without cryptogamic crusts. Summer conditions during the study ranged from unusually warm (1991; 252 degree-days) to unusually cool (1992; 123 degree-days) with two average years (1994 and 1995; 172 and 166 degree-days, respectively). Differences in reproduction and establishment among these summers included (i) higher germination ability of seeds produced in the warm summer (1991) compared with more average summers (1994 and 1995) and (ii) significant seedling occurrence only in the average summers of 1994 and 1995. Seedling densities were much higher at crusted (206 seedlings/m²) than noncrusted sites (26 seedlings/m²). In both sites, root elongation of seedlings and older plants were significantly greater than shoot elongation, yet in established plants, shoot biomass was much greater than root biomass (root/shoot ratios from 0.1 to 0.3). Reproductive attributes varied among the species examined. Saxifraga caespitosa L. produced much smaller seeds then Draba corymbosa R. Br. ex DC. and Papaver radicatum Rottb., but the largest seeds of S. caespitosa (produced in the warm summer of 1991) had much higher germination rates than any seeds of the other species. Based on an analysis of population age structures, seedling survivorship was low for all species but was especially low for S. caespitosa, despite its higher germination rates. All species were slow to germinate, with isolated seeds under ideal controlled conditions requiring a minimum of 20-30 days at a 20°C day and 15°C night. Seed germination in excised soil blocks under comparable conditions averaged 36-48 days. We believe these polar desert plant species lack special attributes to uniquely exploit the environment of these very stressful locations. Rather, they are simply adept at surviving the rigors experienced there. The same species grow much larger, flower and fruit more abundantly, and produce more viable seeds in high arctic environments more favorable than polar deserts, such as lowland polar oases (e.g. Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada). Within the harsh polar desert landscape of the High Arctic, the presence of a cryptogamic crust that retains surface moisture, prevents soil churning, and includes nitrogen-fixing organisms provides a more favorable habitat for plant reproduction, establishment, and growth. (Au)

H
Arctic poppies; Biomass; Draba; Germination; Nitrogen cycling; Plant distribution; Plant growth; Plant reproduction; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Polar deserts; Saxifraga; Seeds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Forty-seven years of research on the Devon Island ice cap, Arctic Canada   /   Boon, S.   Burgess, D.O.   Koerner, R.M.   Sharp, M.J.
(Arctic, v. 63, no. 1, Mar. 2010, p. 13-29, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 69622.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic63-1-13.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic643
Libraries: ACU

The Devon Island ice cap has been the subject of scientific study for almost half a century, beginning with the first mass balance measurements in 1961. Research on the ice cap was the first to investigate (1) the role of meltwater in seasonal ice-velocity variations on a polythermal Arctic ice cap, (2) the use of air temperature rather than net radiation as a proxy for the energy driving surface melt, and (3) the influence of the changing frequency of specific synoptic weather configurations on glacier melt and mass balance. Other research has included investigations of ice cap geometry, flow dynamics, and mass balance; ice core analyses for records of past climate and contaminant deposition; and studies of changes in ice cap area and volume and their relationship to surface mass balance and ice dynamics. Current research includes ground studies connected to efforts to calibrate and validate the radar altimeter that will be carried by the European Space Agency's (ESA) CryoSat2 satellite, and a major collaborative Canadian International Polar Year (IPY) project focused on the Belcher Glacier, on the northeast side of the ice cap, that examines hydrodynamics of large tidewater glaciers. This paper summarizes our current knowledge of the Devon Island ice cap and identifies some of the outstanding questions that continue to limit our understanding of climate-ice cap interactions in Arctic regions. (Au)

F, E, D, B, A, J
Ablation; Accumulation; Aerosols; Air pollution; Arctic Institute of North America; Boreholes; Calving (Ice); Climate change; Cores; Drainage; Effects of climate on ice; Expeditions; Firn; Flow; Glacier ice; Glaciers; Glaciology; Ice caps; Icebergs; Mapping; Marine geology; Mass balance; Mathematical models; Measurement; Meteorology; Palaeoclimatology; Remote sensing; Research; SAR; Satellite photography; Sea level; Submarine topography; Synoptic climatology; Temporal variations; Thermal regimes; Thickness; Tides; Topography

G0813, G0815
Belcher Glacier, Nunavut; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Devon Island waters, Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands, N.W.T./Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut


Occurrence and distribution of zoosporic fungi from Devon Island, Canadian Eastern Arctic   /   Booth, T.   Barrett, P.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 49, no. 3, Mar. 1971, p. 359-369, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 38895.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b71-060
Libraries: ACU

Zoosporic fungi, mainly Chytridiales, are recorded from 61 sites in 10 different Base Camp [Truelove] Lowland habitats. Of the eight genera and 19 species recovered Catenophylyctis (Phlyctorhiza) variabilis, Hyphochytrium catenoides, Nowakowskiella elegans, Olpidium pendulum, Rhizophydium pollinis-pini, R. sphaerotheca, Rhizophydium sp. (utricularae?), and Pythium irregularae have been reported from the Arctic before. Chytriomyces annulatus, C. poculatus, Nowakowskiella macrospora, N. ramosa, Rhizidium verrucosum, Rhizophydium angulosum, R. coronum, R. eleyensis, R. karlingii, Rhizophydium sp. (nodulosum?), and Rhizophydium sp. (patellarium?) are reported for the first time from the Arctic. (Au)

H, J
Fungi; Plant distribution; Plant taxonomy; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Muskox dung; its turnover rate and possible role on Truelove Lowland   /   Booth, T.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 531-545
References.
ASTIS record 16665.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

One feature of the Truelove Lowland ecosystem is the presence of herbivore, particularly muskox, fecal material. Since there have been few studies on abiotic and biotic factor effects on vertebrate dung decomposition processes ... determination of thermal and moisture regimes and turnover times was undertaken. Also, determination of dung contributions of minerals and organic substances to so-called "nutrient poor" tundra ecosystems was considered important. Several microhabitats occur on the Lowland and, in order to account for variations in decomposition, it was decided to study the Beach Ridge Crest (RC) and Backslope (BS), the Hummocky Sedge-moss Meadow (HSMM), and Wet Sedge-moss Meadow (WSMM) sites. ... (Au)

I, J
Animal waste products; Biodegradation; Manures; Muskoxen; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Taxonomic notes on coprophilous fungi of the Arctic : Churchill, Resolute Bay, and Devon Island   /   Booth, T.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 60, no. 7, July 1982, p.1115-1125, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 9468.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b82-141
Libraries: ACU

Various dung substrates including that of arctic fox, arctic hare, arctic wolf, lemming, musk-ox, polar bear, rock ptarmigan, and snow goose were collected from the Churchill region, Resolute Bay region, Scogan Lowland, Sverdrup Lowland, Truelove Lowland, and Truelove Valley. These collections were incubated and surveyed for coprophilous fungi. Of 20 taxa recorded Ascobolus stictoideus, Cheilymenia coprinaria, Coprobia granulata, Lilliputia rufula, Sporormiella bipartis, Sporormiella dubia, Sporormiella minima, Sporormiella septenaria, and a Zopfiella sp. are first reports for Arctic sites. Taxonomic problems are discussed in some detail for Sporormiella intermedia and Thelebolus polysporous. (Au)

H
Animal food; Fungi; Mammals; Plant taxonomy

G0813, G0824
Canadian Arctic Islands; Churchill region, Manitoba; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Chromosomal evolution and biogeography of collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx) in the eastern and High Arctic of Canada   /   Borowik, O.A.   Engstrom, M.D.
(Canadian journal of zoology, v. 71, no. 8, Aug. 1993, p.1481-1493, ill., maps)
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 33824.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/z93-209
Libraries: ACU

Chromosomal variation was examined in 10 populations of Dicrostonyx in the eastern and High Arctic of Canada to determine the extent and nature of chromosomal variation and to examine chromosomal differentiation within and among species and subspecies. Chromosomal data are presented for two species of collared lemmings, D. hudsonius and D. groenlandicus, including D. g. groenlandicus, D. g. clarus, and D. g. lentus. Standard, G-banded, and C-banded karyotypes revealed variation among populations of D. groenlandicus due to Robertsonian fusions and the addition of B chromosomes. G-banding revealed complete homologous banking patterns of autosomal arms between D. groenlandicus and D. hudsonius; however, sex chromosome constitution differed between the two species. Dicrostonyx groenlandicus possesses a neo-XY, formed by a Robertsonian fusion of the sex chromosomes and a pair of autosomes. The neo-XY does not occur in D. hudsonius, and this absence appears to be the primitive state for the genus. (Au)

I, A
Animal distribution; Animal taxonomy; Evolution (Biology); Genetics; Glacial epoch; Lemmings; Refugia

G0813, G0812
Baffin Island, Nunavut; Belcher Islands, Nunavut; Cornwallis Island, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Prince Patrick Island, N.W.T.; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Permafrost investigations on Truelove Lowland   /   Brown, R.J.E.
Ottawa : National Research Council, 1977?.
[61] p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 15-30, ill., maps
(DBR paper, no. 783)
(Contribution - Canada. Earth Physics Branch, no. 714)
Appendix: Calculations of permafrost thickness, by A.S. Judge.
References.
ASTIS record 1324.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU SSU

Brown, R.J.E. Permafrost investigations on Truelove Lowland. Detailed discussion of surface features characteristic of high latitude permafrost. Soil and rock profiles, ground temperature and snow cover measurements are taken at thermocouple cable sites, thickness of the active layer and depth of thaw, and correlations in the relationship between permafrost and environmental factors are also studied. Judge, A.S. Calculations of permafrost thickness. Permafrost thickness at Truelove Lowland may be as thin as 210 m in coastal areas (Limestone-Coast Site) and as thick as 659 m on the adjacent upland (Upland Plateau Site). The presence of a nearby relatively warm sea has a highly modifying influence on coastal areas increasing the subsurface temperature at the Limestone-Coast Site by 6° C at a depth of 90 to 170 m. ... (Au)

C
Active layer; Frozen ground; Permafrost; Temperature; Thickness

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Nature's laboratory in a High Arctic oasis : Devon Island's Truelove Lowland   /   Bruemmer, F.
(Canadian geographic, v.104, no. 1, Feb./Mar. 1984, p. 34-40, col. ill., 1 col. map)
ASTIS record 43045.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This article chronicles some of the biological studies that were undertaken at the Devon Island Research Station of the Arctic Institute of North America on the Truelove Lowland during the author's stay. (ASTIS)

I, J, H
Animals; Arctic Institute of North America; Biology; International Biological Programme; Plants (Biology); Research; Research personnel; Research stations; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Nitrogen accumulation in the development of a High Arctic sedge meadow ecosystem   /   Chapin, D.M.   Bliss, L.C.   Bledsoe, L.J.
In: 17th Annual Arctic Workshop, April 14-16, 1988, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. - Boulder, Colo. : Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, 1988, p. 10-11
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 44709.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

At Truelove Lowland (Devon Island, NWT, Canada) we are investigating the development of sedge meadows along a young, isostatically rebounding shore area. Critical to the development of this ecosystem is the fixation of nitrogen by cyanobacteria, dominated by Nostoc commune. By examining spatial and temporal variation in rates of nitrogen fixation and denitrification, we are determining environmental controls on nitrogen accumulation in developing meadows. We used acetylene reduction as an indirect measure of nitrogen fixation on Nostoc commune thalli and 8 cm diameter soil-plant cores (all measurements at uniform temperature and light). ... Preliminary measurements of denitrification rates ... indicate that nitrogen losses through this pathway are low (c. 3% of N fixed) but vary among community types. Higher rates were found in moss-dominated hummocks than in a mature sedge meadow. Although drier, hummocks may be more favorable sites for denitrification because of higher nitrification rates. These measurements along with those of rate changes in relation to moisture, temperature, and light are being used in the construction of a dynamic model to predict N accumulation seasonally and through the long-term development of a high arctic sedge meadow ecosystem. (Au)

H, A, J, C
Cyanophyceae; Meadows; Nitrogen cycling; Plant-soil relationships; Sedges; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Environmental regulation of nitrogen fixation in a High Arctic lowland ecosystem   /   Chapin, D.M.   Bliss, L.C.   Bledsoe, L.J.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 69, no. 12, Dec. 1991, p.2744-2755, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 55859.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b91-345
Libraries: ACU

This study examined spatial and temporal variation in cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation and the environmental regulation of this variation at Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. Acetylene reduction rates of soil-plant cores from a variety of plant communities were measured under uniform conditions of light and temperature during the 1987 and 1988 growing seasons. Concurrent measurements of soil moisture and extractable nitrogen and phosphorus were also made. Effects of temperature, moisture, and phosphorus were examined in manipulative experiments. Acetylene reduction rates were highest in brackish environments, intermediate in mesic to hydric terrestrial and in aquatic communities, and lowest on xeric beach ridges. Rates generally increased during early season, then decreased through mid to late season. Among the three parameters examined, rates were most highly correlated to soil moisture. The temperature optimum for fixation was near 20°C. There was a strong, but reversible, depression in acetylene reduction in response to experimental desiccation, and weekly phosphorus fertilization had a strong positive effect on fixation rates. The highest fixation rates along the marine shoreline were associated with high phosphorus input from marine algae and greater biomass of cyanobacteria. Because of the overriding importance of moisture, changes in nitrogen and phosphorus levels accompanying ecosystem development do not appear to strongly control nitrogen fixation in terrestrial, nonbrackish sites in this polar desert oasis. (Au)

H, C, J, B
Algae; Biomass; Bottom sediments; Cores; Cyanophyceae; Fertilizers; Growing season; Meadows; Measurement; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Phosphorus; Plant distribution; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Salt marshes; Seasonal variations; Sedges; Shorelines; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Soils; Solar radiation; Temporal variations; Tundra ecology; Tundra ponds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Nitrogen, mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification in a High Arctic lowland ecosystem, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Chapin, D.M.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 28, no. 1, Feb. 1996, p. 85-92, ill., 2 maps)
References.
ASTIS record 52487.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1552089
Libraries: ACU

This study examined nitrogen (N) transformations in two sites at Truelove Lowland (Devon Island, NWT, Canada). The two sites (sedge meadow and willow/herb hummocks) were located at the low end and midway along the beach ridge-basin topographic gradient typical of Truelove Lowland. Net N-mineralization and nitrification rates were measured using both field (late June through July) and laboratory incubations. Denitrification rates (July) were measured using the acetylene blockage technique. Natural abundance of 15N was analyzed in plant tissue and soils from both sites, but were higher in the willow-herb hummock soils incubated in the laboratory. Nitrification and denitrification rates were significantly higher in the drier hummock site. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (delta 15N) from the hummock site were 1.82‰ higher in soil, 1.20‰ higher in moss, and 3.25‰ higher in Salix arctica leaves compared to ratios from the meadow site, consistent with the long-term enrichment of the 15N isotope in the hummock site resulting from higher nitrification and denitrification rates. Rates of nitrification along the beach ridge-basin gradient appear to be controlled primarily by differences in moisture, whereas denitrification rates are governed by nitrate concentration. Thus, topographic control of N transformations is both direct and indirect and is exerted on one, rather than multiple, points of the N cycle in this high arctic lowland ecosystem. (Au)

J, A, C, H
Bryophytes; Cores; Growing season; Hummocks; Isotopes; Leaves; Meadows; Measurement; Mosses; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Sedges; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Soils; Tundra ecology; Willows

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


An initial test of sediment magnetic susceptibility and its paleolimnological implications, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Child, M.M.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1991.
110 p.
Thesis (B.Sc.) - Dept. of Geography, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1991.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32281.
Languages: English

A Bartington Instruments Magnetic Susceptibility Meter was used to measure the magnetic susceptibility of lake sediment samples from the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. Magnetic susceptibility was calculated on wet samples and expressed as mass specific susceptibility per gram dry weight material corrected for organic matter content. Tests indicate that the meter provides both reliable and reproducible results. Magnetic susceptibility signals varied greatly from lake to lake, as did intra-lake core susceptibilities, in response to differing sediment input processes active in each of the catchment basins. In the lakes studied, proximity to ocean, proximity to the sedimentary escarpment, and the presence of organic-rich sediments in the catchment exerted the strongest controls on the magnetic susceptibilities observed. Isolation of Lowland lakes is registered in sediment records as variations in susceptibility. Marine sediments exhibit considerably higher magnetic susceptibilities than do freshwater sediments. This analysis has shown that organic matter influences susceptibility to an appreciable degree. This suggests that it is highly appropriate to correct magnetic susceptibility values for sample organic content. It also indicates that magnetic susceptibility data on its own is equivocal and that supplemental data is needed for more detailed interpretations. (Au)

B, F
Bottom sediments; Instruments; Lakes; Magnetic properties; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic and alpine plant water relations   /   Courtin, G.M.   Mayo, J.M.
In: Physiological adaptation to the environment / Edited by F.J. Vernberg. - New York : Intext Educational Publishers, 1975, p. 201-224, ill.
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 22)
References.
ASTIS record 44375.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This chapter reviews recent information concerning arctic and alpine plant water relations and compares physiological adaptations to environmental stress where possible. Information which is not recent will be used as needed. A second purpose is to call attention to areas of arctic and alpine plant water relations where more information is desirable. ... (Au)

H, E, J
Atmospheric temperature; Cold adaptation; Effects of temperature on plants; Energy budgets; Plant physiology; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Soil temperature; Solar radiation; Tundra ecology; Winds

G0813, G06, G0812
Alaska; Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T.; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Microclimatological studies on Truelove Lowland   /   Courtin, G.M.   Labine, C.L.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 73-104, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16631.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

...The Canadian program, initiated in 1970, included the first attempt at long range microclimatic measurement in the Canadian High Arctic. Furthermore, the studies on the Truelove Lowland were undertaken with the biota in mind and most data gathering was concentrated in the biologically active snow-free period and the months that immediately preceded and followed it. The program had one complete over-winter period of data collection. Thus the studies on Truelove Lowland were microenvironmental in nature as opposed to being purely microclimatological and were initiated with three principal aims in mind: 1. The descriptive microclimatology of a high arctic coastal lowland including the spatial variation that exists over the 4.3 km² lowland, 4 km² valley, and adjacent plateau. 2. the evaluation of energy input, both as shortwave and net radiation, to the Lowland. 3. Assistance with environmental measurement requested by other researchers in the project, either because of a requirement for precision beyond that sought at the microclimatological stations or in locations not covered by the station network. (Au)

E
Microclimatology

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


High Arctic microclimatological data analysis study   /   Courtin, G.M.   Labine, C.L.
[S.l. : s.n.], 1978.
iii, 66 leaves : ill., tables, maps, graphs ; 29cm.
Bibliography: leaves 63-66.
ASTIS record 900.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... This report consists of three sections; the first one deals with the fohn phenomenon, the second one with the surface energy processes and microclimatic characteristics of some of the major tundra types, and the third one is a brief report on our ongoing research with a self-aspirating radiation shield for temperature sensors. ... (Au)

E
Biology; Fohns; Microclimatology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Northern Heritage Society   /   d'Argencourt, M.   Webster, D.
In: Student research in Canada's North : Proceedings of the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, November 18-19, 1986 / Edited by W. Peter Adams and Peter G. Johnson. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1988, p. 420-422
Abstract in English and French.
References.
ASTIS record 34158.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Northern Heritage Society (N.H.S.) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1979, with its head office based in Yellowknife, N.W.T. The Society's main objective, the Northern Heritage Research Project (N.H.R.P.), emphasized the research of Inuit culture and pre-history. This is established by the operation of a scientific field school, currently located at Truelove Lowland, on Devon Island in the High Arctic. This field school teaches young northerners between the ages of seventeen to twenty-two, the skills of scientific research through data collection methods in archaeology, ecology, and environmental geography. Upon the successful completion of the Northern Heritage Society's field school, the students may find employment in the scientific community. This is done with the help of the Arctic Science Program (A.S.A.P.), a job placement project, established by the Society in 1985. As former field school participants, we feel this program will have a great influence on native students who go through this program and are undecided about furthering their education, or the field of work they might like to work in. (Au)

R, T, U, J
Archaeology; Ecology; Native peoples; Natural history; Northern Heritage Society; Occupational training; Science

G0812, G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut; Yellowknife, N.W.T.


Species patterns, edaphic characteristics, and plant water potential in a high-arctic brackish marsh   /   Dawson, T.E.   Bliss, L.C.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 65, no. 5, May 1987, p. 863-868, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 20818.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b87-118
Libraries: ACU

Coastal brackish and salt marshes in the High Arctic are very limited floristically and in areal extent. Small marshes located on the northeast coast of Devon Island are dominated by distinct zones of Puccinellia phyganodes nearest the sea with Carex ursina, C. stans, Dupontia fisheri, and Alopecurus alpinus dominated zones landward. Soil salinity and chloride ion content increase seaward, but plant water potential becomes less negative, opposite to the expected pattern. Fresh water from the melting pack ice forms a lens over the more dense seawater below it. This meltwater dilutes the salts in the upper soil layer creating a low salinity condition for the plants that inhabit the zones nearest the sea. We hypothesize that it is this "fresh" water that comes into contact with the roots of Puccinellia and Carex ursina, and thus, less-negative water potentials are maintained in these species. Although plant zonation can be explained in part by such considerations, we conclude that edaphic characteristics are not the only factors involved. A number of hypotheses are entertained. (Au)

H, C
Meadows; Plant distribution; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Salinity; Salt marshes; Sedges; Soil moisture; Soil pH; Soils

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Comparative ecophysiological adaptations in Arctic and alpine populations of a dioecious shrub, Salix arctica Pall   /   Dawson, T.E.
Seattle, Wash. : University of Washington, 1987.
xii, 208 leaves : ill. (some col), maps ; 28 cm.
Thesis (Ph.D) - University of Washington, Dept. of Botany, Seattle, Wash., 1987.
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 28781.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Within the High Arctic of North America only two dwarf shrub species predominate and of these, Salix arctica has the broadest distribution, occurring from the Arctic to the northern and central Rocky Mountains and the Cascade Ranges. Mr. Dawson has studied the morphological and physiological attributes of this species .... His major objectives have been to determine the physiological traits that enable plants to occupy both xeric and mesic to wet habitats and further to determine whether male and female plants are better adapted to one or the other habitat. This dissertation is one of the first to demonstrate that there is a suite of physiological and morphological attributes that result in one sex being better adapted than the other in a given habitat. These findings directly relate to the reproductive success of the sexes. Female plants predominate in wetter habitats where soils are colder, soil and atmospheric evaporative demand is less, and soil nutrients are higher. Female plants are more tolerant of low soil temperatures and maintain higher stomatal conductance and photosynthesis than male plants under these conditions. This leads to greater leaf area, greater root and shoot growth and higher reproductive effort in female vs. male plants in mesic-wet meadows. In contrast, male plants are more successful in xeric habitats due to a greater ability to osmoregulate and therefore maintain higher turgor potentials under conditions of lower soil water potential and drier air. This allows male plants to maintain higher stomatal conductance and thus gain more carbon than female plants. This permits male plants to develop a greater leaf area, maintain higher root and shoot growth and have a greater reproductive effort than female plants in these drier habitats. Alpine plants possess similar traits to arctic plants but in general they show less pronounced differences. ... (Au)

H, J, E, C
Adaptation (Biology); Climatology; Cold adaptation; Cold physiology; Gender differences; Meadows; Microclimatology; Photosynthesis; Plant distribution; Plant ecology; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Plant physiology; Plant reproduction; Plant taxonomy; Theses; Tundra ecology; Willows

G0813, G0812
Cameron Island, Nunavut; Cornwallis Island, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Melville Island, N.W.T./Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Velocity of radio waves in ice by means of a bore-hole interferometric technique   /   De Q. Robin, G.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 15, no. 73, 1975, p. 151-159, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 40967.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Radio waves of fixed frequency, which had passed through ice and firn from a transmitting antenna lowered down a bore hole, were monitored on the surface. By mixing the received signal with the fixed frequency, the beats which were produced as the antenna was lowered gave a value for the wavelength in ice at the depth of the anntenna. This was multiplied by the frequency to give the velocity of radio waves in ice. Measurements averaged over 10 m and longer intervals were related to density values from bore holes in the same location. Results above 50 m were difficult to interpret, but at greater depths the velocities fitted a linear relationship between refractive index and density. A small extrapolation gives a velocity of radio waves in pure ice of 167.7±0.3 m/µs at -20 C. (Au)

F
Antennae; Boreholes; Firn; Ice caps; Measurement; Radio waves; Velocity

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Constraints to nitrogen fixation by cryptogamic crusts in a polar desert ecosystem, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Dickson, L.G.
(Arctic, antarctic, and alpine research, v. 32, no. 1, Feb. 2000, p. 40-45, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 48584.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1552408
Libraries: ACU

Polar desert ecosystems, which dominate the landscape throughout much of the High Arctic, are environmentally stressed and limited in their development. Scattered intermittently over these landscapes are areas of cryptogamic crust development that are associated with increased vascular plant abundance. Since nutrient limitation, especially nitrogen, is significant in these ecosystems, I wished to examine the role of these cryptogamic crusts in the supply of fixed nitrogen and the constraints to that fixation. Nitrogen fixation rates (as measured by acetylene reduction) were highest in sites with a well-developed cryptogamic crust, lowest in sites with only bare mineral soil, and intermediate in sites with a partially developed crust. Highest rates of acetylene reduction (i.e., nitrogen fixation) were seen within a few days of snowmelt (late June to early July) and declined as the season progressed, until near the end of the growing season (1-5 August) when rates were approximately 50% of early season rates. Late season precipitation events restored acetylene reduction rates to near original levels. In manipulative experiments, acetylene reduction rates dropped dramatically as crust moisture content declined and rates increased as soil surface temperature increased to 24°C. A significant finding was that acetylene reduction at 3°C was 40% of that found at 12 to 13°C. Thus, there is a potential for nitrogen accumulation even during the colder periods of the growing season. As calculations show, the quantity of nitrogen fixed by these cryptogamic crusts was adequate to support the nitrogen needs of the mosses and vascular plants of these developing ecosystems. (Au)

H, C, J, E
Bacteria; Fungi; Lichens; Mosses; Nitrogen cycling; Plant distribution; Plant ecology; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Precipitation (Meteorology); Snowmelt; Soil temperature

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island programs 1971   /   Elcock, W.   Barrett, P.   Teeri, J.A.
(Arctic, v. 25, no. 2, June 1972, p. 155-158)
ASTIS record 53551.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic25-2-155.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2957
Libraries: ACU

From April to October 1971 the Arctic Institute's research base on the northeast coast of Devon Island (75°40'N, 84°40'W) was the seat of operations for over 50 investigators and their field assistants. The major research program was a large integrated tundra ecosystem study sponsored by the Canadian International Biological Program (IBP) .... The Base Camp was also used, though briefly, by groups of researchers from the Canadian Wildlife Survey conducting polar bear studies in northern Devon Island, and from the Polar Continental Shelf Project who were making glaciological studies of the Devon Island Ice Cap. ... The status and condition of the Base Camp, and the logistics services, remain essentially as reported in the 1970 field summary ..., although minor improvements and repairs were made to the 8 huts, and the water and power system and local transportation facilities were improved by the addition of another skidoo, bringing the total to 3. ... In 1971, as in the previous summer, the size and capacity (unfortunately not synonymous) of the Base Camp increased. Those who have visited the Camp in previous years would find little resemblance today. The Camp at present consists of 8 Parcolls and Jamesways (many of which were enlarged in 1971), which together with tents, some lent to the Institute by the Canadian Forces, provided both laboratory and living space. A secondary camp, situated some 5 miles from Base Camp, provided a base of operations for a group of researchers from the University of Manitoba. Remote from the large population of Base Camp it made work on muskoxen and other mammals somewhat easier. One problem that came to the fore in 1971 was how to keep to the minimum the impact of relatively large numbers of people with their equipment on the Truelove Lowland itself. All of those who lived at Base Camp cooperated in efforts to avoid any unsightliness and in fact several visitors noted the general tidiness of the area. Outside the BaseCamp, movement, particularly vehicle movement, was also kept to a minimum. ... [The two AINA-sponsored projects (ecological studies of sedge dominated meadow tundras, comparative ecology of High Arctic species of Saxifraga) are summarized.] (Au)

J, H, I, L, M

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Devon Island programs, 1972-1973   /   Elcock, W.   Hoyer, M.   Barrett, P.   Schulten, R.
(Arctic, v. 26, no. 1, Mar. 1973, p. 81-82)
ASTIS record 53533.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic26-1-81.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2902
Libraries: ACU

From April 1972 through the 1973 field season, the Arctic Institute's research base on the northeast coast of Devon Island (75°40'N, 84°40'W) will be the seat of operations for scores of investigators and their field assistants. The major research program continues to be a large integrated tundra ecosystem study sponsored by the Canadian International Biological Program (IBP). The Base Camp is also being used by groups of researchers from the Canadian Wildlife Survey, and from the Polar Continental Shelf Project. The two AINA-sponsored projects are summarized below. ... During the summer of 1972, and the winter of 1972-73, the camp was used as a communications centre, and for providing other assistance to research stations established on Coburg Island and on the Carey Islands (Greenland) which are part of the Institute's North Water Project. ... [1] ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SEDGE-DOMINATED MEADOW TUNDRA. During the 1972 field season studies were continued on the ecology of sedge-dominated meadows. ... Studies of rhizome behaviour were continued. Complete systems were excavated and collected at five locations. Rhizome growth was monitored on selected individual plants. ... Population characteristics of sedges invading small ponds and drained lake systems were further investigated. Three-and-a-half weeks were spent at the National Museum of Natural History camp on Bathurst Island. ... six sedge meadows were selected and analysed for comparison with the Devon Island meadows. Five permanent plots were also established and mapped and populations of Carex stans collected for both seed and morphological measurements. A project to investigate the revegetation of vehicle-disturbed sedge meadows with native Carex species was also initiated. ... Analysis of plantings of Carex stans as well as natural revegetation in some blocks will be monitored in following seasons. ... [2] VEGETATION STUDIES ON THE INTERIOR PLATEAU. ... A 2.4 km transect was placed east from the Plateau margin to the interior. The transect crossed a number of habitats, including solifluction terraces, stripes and sorted nets. Four maximum-minimum thermometer enclosures and two hygrothermograph stations were set out to determine microclimatic variations along the line. Forty 25 m² quadrats were placed at 80 m intervals along the transect for vegetation analysis. At each plot, the percentage cover of rock, soil, vascular plants and bryophytes was calculated; species composition was determined and voucher specimens from each quadrat were collected. Lichen specimens were also collected for later taxonomic determinations in the laboratory. Surface soil samples from each plot were collected for mechanical and chemical analysis. ... At 5 points along the transect, regular sampling of soil at 0 and 15 cm was undertaken to determine a curve of seasonal soil moisture. These values will be compared with concurrent samples taken in nonsorted circles on the Lowland. In addition to the 40 systematic plots, 5 additional sites were also ana1ysed. ... Comparisons with the transect data should indicate if the visual homogeneity of the vegetation on the Plateau is constant over a large area. A high density bryophyte community at the head of a drainage system and one solifluction terrace characterized by Alopecurus were also analysed. These sites were unusual in that they both had vegetation cover values greater than 40 per cent. Other plots on the Plateau had values of 1 to 4 per cent. ... (Au)

H, J, C, M

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Establishing the provenance of catchment-derived pond sediments : Truelove Lowland, Devon Island   /   Fishback, L.E.   King, R.H. [Supervisor]
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 2002.
xvii, 342 p. : ill. maps ; 28 cm.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. NQ77086)
ISBN 0-612-77086-9
Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 2002.
Indexed from a PDF file acquired from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 57083.
Languages: English
Libraries: OONL

Ponds are more common than lakes in the high arctic landscape and until recently have been ignored as sources of paleoenvironmental information. The sediments from Pooh Pond and adjacent Fish Lake on Truelove Lowland are examined using a variety of physical, chemical and mineralogical techniques to assess the feasibility of using arctic pond sediments as a record of environmental processes. Fish Lake is a large, 7 m deep and ultra-oligotrophic freshwater lake that contains a sediment record of the post-glacial emergence of the lake analyzed from a 1.92 m core. The sediments of Pooh Pond, a large, 1.2 m deep, freshwater pond are characterized with four short sediment cores (<40 cm). Chemical fractionation and selective extractions are used to characterize pond sediments and differentiate between materials from the catchment and the water body. A 14C sediment basal date of 5,980 ±40 yrs BP (Beta-162840) from 32 cm depth was comparable to the predicted emergence date, indicating a freshwater origin of sediments collected. Significant differences between the four cores indicate the impact of local sedimentary environments within the pond. Examination of the biogeochemical characteristics of the sediment and associated current processes in the pond indicate that organic carbon is autochthonous and Fe, Al and Mn are originating in the catchment soils. Profile morphologies reflecting the pedogenic and cryogenic processes were found within a catena of four Cryosols on the intervening raised beach. Soils on the raised beach crest were poorly developed with pervection. Brunification dominates the upper and lower foreslope soils, while translocation of Fe and Al are indicative of localized podzolization. Soils at the slope base are waterlogged with accumulated organic matter over a gleyed silty parent material with high concentrations of Mn and Fe. A series of discriminant function analyses using reference sets comprising biogeochemical variables from the lake core and the catchment soils are used to identify the provenance of the pond sediments. It was concluded that the pond sediments were freshwater and predominantly allochthonous in origin. Modification during transport and deposition obscures the catchment signal and therefore influences interpretation of the autochthonous and allochthonous sediment record. (Au)

F, B, J, E, C, A, H
Biochemistry; Bottom sediments; Carbon; Cores; Drainage; Electrical properties; Energy budgets; Formation; Frozen ground; Geochemistry; Iron; Lake ice; Lakes; Lichens; Logistics; Magnesium; Manganese; Measurement; Melting; Minerals; Mosses; Nitrogen; Oligotrophic lakes; Oxygen; Periglacial landforms; Precipitation (Meteorology); Radiocarbon dating; Sedges; Silica; Size; Slopes; Snow cover; Snowmelt; Soil classification; Soil moisture; Soil profiles; Soil temperature; Spectroscopy; Temperature; Temporal variations; Thermal regimes; Theses; Tundra ponds; Water pH; Watersheds

G0813
Fish Lake region, Nunavut; Fish Lake, Nunavut; Pooh Pond, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Comparison of 100,000 years of oxygen isotope and insoluble impurity profiles from the Devon Island and Camp Century ice cores   /   Fisher, D.A.
(Quaternary research, v. 11, no. 3, May 1979, p. 299-305, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 3478.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1016/0033-5894(79)90077-2
Libraries: ACU

Oxygen-isotope profiles for the Devon Island ice cap and Camp Century Greenland are affected by a number of variables, some of which must have been the same for both sites. The two delta (18O) records spanning about 120,000 years are brought into relative alignment by comparison of major delta features, and subsequent verification that the insoluble particulate concentration records were also in phase for this alignment. The difference between the delta profiles is shown to be mainly a function of the altitude of the accumulation area for Camp Century. ... The maximum altitude for the Camp Century accumulation area is 1500 m above the present site and is almost synchronous with the maximum in particulate concentration that occurs at 16,000 yr B.P. The synchronism is likely due to the maximum sea-level lowering that exposed vast areas of continental shelf to wind erosion. (Au)

F
Cores; Ice; Impurities; Oxygen-18; Sea level

G0813, G10
Arctic Basin; Camp Century, Greenland; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Ice-core study : a climatic link between the past, present and future   /   Fisher, D.A.   Koerner, R.M.
(Climatic change in Canada 3 : National Museum of Natural Sciences project on climatic change in Canada during the past 20,000 Years / Edited by C.R. Harrington. Syllogeus - National Museum of Natural Sciences, no. 49, 1983, p. 50-69, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 13545.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... In this paper we will outline the way climate has changed in the High Arctic over the past few thousand years, giving particular attention to the last few hundred years. Based on knowledge of the past, we will attempt to evaluate the magnitude of climatic change, extrapolate our climatic record a few decades into the future, and indicate how this might affect human development and extractive industries in the North. We consider only the natural climatic record, essentially disregarding various effects produced by people. The magnitude of these effects, termed anthropogenic, are disputed and we will mention them briefly later. (Au)

E, V, F
Climate change; Climatology; Cores; History; Ice caps

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Meighen Island, Nunavut


Stratigraphic noise in time series derived from ice cores   /   Fisher, D.A.   Reeh, N.   Clausen, H.B.
(Proceedings of the Symposium on Snow and Ice Chemistry and the Atmosphere, held in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, 19-24 August 1984 / Edited by W.P. Adams. Annals of glaciology, v. 7, 1985, p. 76-83, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 40620.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Because of snow drifting, two time series of any variable derived from two adjacent ice cores will differ considerably. The size and statistical nature of this noise element is discussed for two kinds of measured substance. A theory is developed and compared to data from Greenland and Canadian Arctic ice cores. In case 1, the measured substance can diffuse and the seasonal cycle degrade with time and depth, e.g. delta (18O). In case 2, the measured substance cannot diffuse, e.g. microparticles. The case 2 time series contain drift noise proportional to that in the accumulation series. For accumulation series, the spectral power is concentrated at the high frequencies, i.e. is "blue". Such noise can be easily reduced by taking relatively short time averages. The noise in the case 1 time series, however, starts out "blue" but quickly diffuses to have a "red" character with significant power at longer wavelengths, and many decades of such series must be averaged to reduce the noise level. Because the seasonal amplitude of any given variable is an important input to the drift noise and because the seasonal amplitudes of some variable types are latitude-dependent, some sites have inherently less drift noise than others. (Au)

F
Accumulation; Cores; Firn; Glaciers; Ice caps; Ice sheets; Impurities; Isotopes; Mathematical models; Measurement; Noise; Snow; Surface properties; Temperature

G0813, G10
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Greenland


Anthropogenic tundra disturbances in the Canadian eastern Arctic : an airphoto chronology coupled with detailed surface investigations   /   Forbes, B.C.
In: 19th Arctic Workshop, March 8-10, 1990, INSTAAR, University of Colorado : program and abstracts. - Boulder, Colo. : INSTAAR, 1990, p. 23
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 43938.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Human impact on Arctic ecosystems has received a good deal of attention in recent decades. Terrestrial vegetation recovery in the wake of transient settlement has often been the focus for such studies, for reasons concerning both aesthetic and habitat status of affected areas. ... This study concerns unassisted long-term vascular plant recovery at 3 sites (Old Clyde River, Baffin Island; Truelove Lowland, Devon Island; and Lake Hazen, Ellesmere Island) in the Canadian High Arctic. For two of these sites (Truelove and Lake Hazen), the nature and duration of human impact are well documented. The poster illustrates a chronology of settlement and its associated impacts for one of these sites (Old Clyde River.) ... (Au)

H, C, M, L, J
Effects monitoring; Environmental impacts; Foundations; Meadows; Permafrost; Plants (Biology); Soil consolidation; Soil moisture; Trails; Tundra ecology; Vehicles

G0813
Baffin Island, Nunavut; Hazen, Lake, region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Anthropogenic tundra disturbance and patterns of response in the Eastern Canadian Arctic   /   Forbes, B.C.
Montreal : McGill University, 1993.
xvii, 333, [79] leaves : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.
ISBN 0-7717-0418-6
Thesis (Ph.D.) - McGill University, Dept. of Geography, Northern Studies Program, Montréal, 1993.
Appendices.
Bibliography: p. 298-324.
ASTIS record 42555.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The literature of disturbance ecology reveals that, under present climatic conditions, non-native plants have little or no role in high arctic trundra revegetation. Rather, it has been suggested that indigenous flora, especially long-lived perennial graminoids, are crucial to recovery. However, few long-term data are available on past impacts within productive sedge-meadows in the High Arctic, and none which consider the non-vascular flora. This thesis combines biogeographical and patch dynamics perspectives to focus on ±21 yr of natural and assisted recovery of vegetation and soils from a wide range of dated anthropogenic surface disturbances at three Canadian Arctic sites. Empirical, experimental and archival investigations were made among climatically similar, but widely disjunct, coastal lowlands of contrasting geologies on Baffin, Devon, and Cornwallis Islands. These data emcompass minerotrophic and oligotrophic wetlands in which the vascular floras show minimal differentiation yet the sampled bryofloras share only 31.8% of their total taxa. The occurrences chosen for study are representative of the most widespread, small-scale human impacts in the North, including vehicular, pedestrian, construction, and pollution disturbances. It was determined that rutting from even a single passage of a tracked vehicle in summer resulted in significant reductions in species richness and biomass. On slopes ±2°, these same small ruts have drained large areas of peatlands, a serious cumulative impact. Long-term effects of drainage include the local extinction of populations of Sphagnum spp. and rhizomatous vascular aquatics, and changes in the chemistry and thermal regime of drained mineral soils. Other effects include significant changes in biomass and the concentrations of macronutrients in the leaves of dominant species. These effects were magnified in peatlands drained where multi-pass vehicle movements occurred. Species richness displayed an inverse relationship with trampling intensity and the soils of heavily trampled ground remained severely compacted after 21 years. These patches were dominated by dense swards of ruderal grasses. Nutrient concentrations in the leaves of the latter and other colonizing and surviving species tended to increase with trampling intensity. Trampled patches and archaeological sites appeared selectively grazed by several herbivores. Although humans initiated the disturbances within these patches, it is the animals which are responsible for many of the dynamics of patch change over the long-term. Classification and ordination procedures revealed linkages between the floristic associations of trampled meadows on Baffin Island and archaeological sites on Devon and Cornwallis Islands. One citical implication is that even low levels of human impact may give rise to ruderal plant communities which are extremely persistent. These patches are poor in terms of species richness, but contribute to habitat heterogeneity at the landscape level and comprise preferred forage for local vertebrate herbivores. Archaeological excavation and restoration revealed that at least some stores of viable seed exist in both mesic and wet tundra soils and point to the importance of initial floristic composition (sensu Egler 1954). From a long-term perspective, the data establish that mesic tundra vegetation and soils are easily disturbed and recover much more slowly than their low arctic counterparts under similar disturbance regimes. (Au)

J, H, L, C, U
All-terrain vehicles; Biomass; Chemical properties; Cumulative effects; Drainage; Environmental impacts; Grasses; Human ecology; Inuit archaeology; Meadows; Mosses; Plant distribution; Plant nutrition; Plant succession; Plant-soil relationships; Pollution; Primary production (Biology); Revegetation; Runoff; Soil consolidation; Soil temperature; Thermal regimes; Theses; Tundra ecology; Wetlands

G0813
Clyde River (Hamlet) region, Nunavut; Resolute Bay region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Plant communities of archaeological sites, abandoned dwellings, and trampled tundra in the eastern Canadian Arctic : a multivariate analysis   /   Forbes, B.C.
(Arctic, v. 49, no. 2, June 1996, p. 141-154, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 38300.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic49-2-141.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1192
Libraries: ACU

Arctic terrestrial ecosystems subjected to anthropogenic disturbance return to their original state only slowly, if at all. Investigations of abandoned settlements on three islands in the eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago have detected striking similarities among contemporary and ancient human settlements with regard to their effects on tundra vegetation and soils. Ordination procedures using 240 quadrats showed the plant assemblages of Thule (ca. 800 B.P.) winter dwellings on northern Devon and southern Cornwallis Islands to be floristically similar to pedestrian-trampled meadows on northeast Baffin Island last used ca. 1969. Comparisons from the literature made with other North American sites in the Low Arctic reveal similar findings. The implication is that the depauperate flora of the Arctic has a limited number of species able to respond to disturbance, and that anthropogenically disturbed patches may be extremely persistent. (Au)

H, U, J, C, L, M
Grasses; Ground ice; Houses; Human ecology; Inuit archaeology; Lichens; Meadows; Mosses; Plant growth; Plant succession; Plant-soil relationships; Plants (Biology); Reclamation; Revegetation; Roads; Soil moisture; Thule culture

G0813
Baffin Island, Nunavut; Clyde River (Hamlet), Nunavut; Cornwallis Island, Nunavut; Resolute, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Ivory gull colonies on the Devon Island ice cap, arctic Canada   /   Frisch, T.
(Arctic, v. 36, no. 4, Dec. 1983, p. 370-371, figures)
References.
ASTIS record 13339.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic36-4-370.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2294
Libraries: ACU

Four small Ivory Gull colonies have been found on nunataks on the ice cap of eastern Devon Island. Mainly on the basis of their similarity to known breeding places of the Ivory Gull on Ellesmere Island, all four sites are believed to be those of nesting colonies the first to be reported from Devon Island. (Au)

I
Animal reproduction; Bird nesting; Gulls; Nunataks

G0815
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


High-arctic lemmings, Dicrostonyx groenlandicus. II. Demography   /   Fuller, W.A.   Martell, A.M.   Smith, R.F.C.   Speller, S.W.
(Canadian journal of zoology, v. 53, no. 6, June 1975, p. 867-878, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 24)
References.
ASTIS record 38902.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/z75-100
Libraries: ACU

Captures of Dicrostonyx groenlandicus on northeastern Devon Island peaked in 1969 and 1973, were higher than expected in 1971, and were minimal (<5 per 1000 trap-nights) in 1970 and 1972. Captures declined from July to August in at least five of seven summers and may have declined in a 6th year (1973). No change was detected in 1972. Body size was maximal in 1973 for mature and immature males and females and for all pelage (=age?) classes. Sexual maturity was delayed, at least in males, in 1973. Wintering females conceive under the snow in May and the litter is weaned at the normal time of snowmelt. Two other summer cohorts are produced by surviving old females and early maturing females of the first litters. None of the late summer cohort matures before the onset of winter. No female examined bore more than two summer litters. Mean summer litter size was 5.7 with no significant variation between years. Mean sex ratio was 50.3% male. It is suggested that density-related effects ought to occur in winter, rather than summer, but evidence on this point is equivocal. Arctic adaptations of D. groenlandicus are discussed. (Au)

I
Adaptation (Biology); Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal growth; Animal population; Animal reproduction; Lemmings

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


High arctic lemmings (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus) I. Natural history observations   /   Fuller, W.A.   Martell, A.M.   Smith, R.F.C.   Speller, S.W.
(Canadian field-naturalist, v. 89, no. 3, July-Sept. 1975, p. 223-233, ill., 1 map)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 23)
References.
ASTIS record 38926.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Greatest density (533.3 per hectare) of burrows of collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus) in a high arctic setting occurred in peat polygons which occupied well under 1% of Truelove Lowland, Devon Island. Raised beaches occupied more than one-quarter of the lowland and had a burrow density of 115.4 per hectare largely associated with frost cracks. Meadows were much less densely settled. Winter nests were found in areas of deepest snow accumulation and were subject to 11.6% predation by Mustela erminea. Subnivean temperature in a meadow site fell gradually to about -25C, where it remained for at least 11 weeks during the winter of 1972-73, when the population was in increase phase. Four species of plants, Dryas integrifolia, Saxifraga oppositifolia, Salix arctica, and Pedicularis sp. predominated in the autumn diet. Presence and calorific values are given for plants in winter habitats. (Au)

I, H, J, E, C
Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal food; Animal population; Dryas; Eriophorum; Lemmings; Lichens; Louseworts; Microclimatology; Natural history; Patterned ground; Plants (Biology); Predation; Saxifraga; Sedges; Tundra ecology; Weasels; Willows; Winter ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Biology and secondary production of Dicrostonyx groenlandicus on Truelove Lowland   /   Fuller, W.A.   Martell, A.M.   Smith, R.F.C.   Speller, S.W.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 437-459, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16661.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Many authors have recognized the pivotal role of lemmings in tundra ecosystems (for reviews see Batzli 1975, and Bliss 1975), not only as primary consumers and a major energy source for higher order consumers, but also as physical agents of change through their burrowing and other activities. Lemming populations are notoriously variable with peaks of abundance apparently occurring on the average every 3 to 4 years. The riddle of lemming cycles provides a second reason for studying the biology of a high arctic population because, in spite of numerous studies conducted in the Low Arctic of both hemispheres, there is no agreement about what factors control or regulate lemming numbers. This paper is based on research on Dicrostonyx groenlandicus over parts of four consecutive summers (1970-73). The major objectives were to determine the role they play in energy transfer within this ecosystem and to investigate their population cycles. (Au)

I
Animal population; Animal reproduction; Energy budgets; Lemmings

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The influence of cryptogamic crust on the thermal environment and temperature relations of plants in a High Arctic polar desert, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Gold, W.G.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 30, no. 2, May 1998, p. 108-120, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 47206.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1552125
Libraries: ACU

The thermal microenvironment and leaf temperatures of two plants (Saxifraga caespitosa and S. oppositifolia) were studied in a high arctic polar desert over four summers. Surface and plant temperatures exceeded air temperatures by 5 to 15°C during sunny periods, with smaller effects on soil temperature in plant rooting zones. Midday plant temperatures of 20 to 30°C measured during good weather are favorable for physiological activity, but the number of such days is restricted by a short snow-free period (16-45 d). Surfaces in polar deserts are dominated by sorted stones and bare mineral soil with sparse vascular plant cover (usually <5%). Infrequent snowflush sites are scattered within this landscape, containing greater plant cover and a cryptogamic crust on the mineral soil surfaces. The potential role of this black crust in facilitating greater plant cover by enhancing the thermal relations of plants was investigated in this cold environment. Reduced albedo of crusted surfaces led to higher surface (8-12°C) and soil (4-5°C) temperatures than in noncrusted areas. However, adult plants did not differ in tissue temperature on cryptogamic and bare surfaces. Root growth and survival of seedlings, which were thermally coupled to the surface by their small mass, are more likely to be highly influenced by the presence of crusted surfaces in this high arctic polar desert ecosystem. (Au)

J, H, C, E
Albedo; Atmospheric temperature; Clouds; Cold adaptation; Effects of temperature on plants; Leaves; Patterned ground; Photosynthesis; Plant cover; Plant-soil relationships; Polar deserts; Primary production (Biology); Saxifraga; Soil temperature; Surface properties; Temperature; Tundra ecology

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Chemical characteristics of lakes in the Truelove Lowlands, Devon Island, Northwest Territories   /   Gregor, D.J.   Gummer, W.D.
Regina, Sask. : Canada. Inland Waters Directorate. Water Quality Branch, 1987.
v, 32 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 36150.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

A unique opportunity was provided in 1985 to obtain characterization of the chemistry of surface waters of Truelove Lowlands, Devon Island, Northwest Territories. The ionic composition of seven lakes in the lowlands are described and discussed as regards their sensitivity to acidic deposition. A comparison of field and laboratory analyses is made drawing attention to possible inaccuracies in technology and/or the change in sample integrity over time. Metal residue concentrations in water, lake sediment and snow are presented and reference is made to efforts to collect and quantify organochlorine residues in freshwater shrimp (Lepidurus sp.). Sediment samples from the lakes are described with respect to metal concentrations and their toxicity to a mixed culture phytoplankton population. (Au)

F, J, H, I
Acid rain; Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Electrical properties; Lakes; Measurement; Metals; Organochlorines; Phytoplankton; Pollution; Shrimp; Snow; Toxicity; Water pH; Water quality

G0813
Beschel Lakes, Nunavut; Fish Lake, Nunavut; Immerk Lake, Nunavut; Phalarope Lake, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic plant community-soil associations mapping using SPOT imagery : Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Guillemette, S.   King, R.H. [Supervisor]
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1998.
142 p.
(ProQuest Dissertations & Theses publication, no. MQ32482)
ISBN 0-612-32482-6
Thesis (M.Sc.) - University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1998.
The citation and abstract information in this record is used with the permission of ProQuest Information and Learning Company. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained from UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone: 734-761-7400. Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Appendices.
References.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from PQDT.
ASTIS record 52963.
Languages: English
Libraries: OONL

A plant community-soil associations model is created to assist in the making of plant community-soil maps using SPOT satellite imagery of the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. Investigations of associations are done in sampling sites along toposequences. The vegetation is classified according to plant communities modified from Muc and Bliss (1977) and Svoboda (1977). The Canadian System for Soil Classification (C.S.S.C., 1992) was used to classify soils to the Subgroup level. The satellite data was simplified using a supervised classification and two band combinations were used to define plant communities and associated soils. Pixel by pixel accuracy assessment was also performed on final maps. Resulting associations were found to be predictable in well-drained and poorly-drained conditions, but less predictable when classified in terms of landscape components. Two maps were produced at a scale of 1:25000. This methodology can be used to efficiently map plant communities and soils in areas where such associations exist. (Au)

H, C, A, F, E, B
Beaches; Climatology; Drainage; Electronic data processing; Geology; Landforms; Lichens; Mapping; Maps; Meadows; Mosses; Optical properties; Plant distribution; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Satellite photography; Sedges; Slopes; Soil classification; Soils; Theses; Topography; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Controlled-environment studies on net assimilation and water relations of Dryas integrifolia   /   Hartgerink, A.P.   Mayo, J.M.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 54, no. 16, Aug. 15, 1976, p.1884-1895, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 13)
References.
ASTIS record 38900.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b76-203
Libraries: ACU

Net CO2 assimilation and water relations of Dryas integrifolia from Devon Island, N.W.T., were studied under controlled-environment conditions. Maximum net CO2 assimilation rate for single leaves was 18.7 mg/g/h. The optimum leaf temperature for net CO2 assimilation was between 9 and 14 C. Positive net CO2 assimilation occurred at -5 C. Respiration and net CO2 assimilation decreased with the onset of dormancy. Dark respiration was generally equal to or greater than that of other arctic and alpine species. The mean leaf water potential of actively growing plants was -11.4 bars. Values higher than -7 bars were found only infrequently. Turgor pressure was maintained at high values (+6 to +10 bars) over a wide range of water potentials, suggesting osmotic adjustment to soil moisture deficit. (Au)

H, C, J
Atmospheric temperature; Carbon dioxide; Dryas; Leaves; Photosynthesis; Plant growth; Plant respiration; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Soil moisture; Temperature; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The University of the Arctic : from Truelove Lowland to Kilpisjarvi   /   Heal, B.
(Learning to be circumpolar : experiences in Arctic academic cooperation / Edited by Richard Langlais and Outi Snellman. Publications in the University of the Arctic process, no. 5, 1998, p. 25-33)
References.
ASTIS record 43648.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

With hindsight, the basic principles of the University of the Arctic began, for me, in the 1970s with the Tundra Biome of the International Biological Programme (IBP). They developed in the 1980s, moving unexpectedly to the tropics through a UNESCO sponsored Programme on Tropical Soil Biology and Fertility (TSBF). Then, returning to the Arctic in the 1990s, with involvment in the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) and the Arctic-alpine Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Initiative (ARTERI), a Concerted Action of the EC, leading to the initiation of the University of the Arctic. What were the threads that joined these activities and led to the University of the Arctic? At least five principles run through these different programmes. ... These principles may be best illustrated by brief, subjective descriptions of some of the key events in these international activities which have left a fundamental belief in the value of cooperative, trans-boundary action. ... (Au)

R
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program; Higher education; International Biological Programme; Research; Universities; University of the Arctic

G01
Canada; Canadian Arctic; Russian Federation; Scandinavia; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The archaeological resources of the Sparbo/Hardy and Truelove Lowland regions, N.W.T. : a report of the 1982 Devon Island Archaeology Project   /   Helmer, J.W.
Calgary, Alta. : Arctic Institute of North America, 1982(?).
iv, 123 p. : figures, tables ; 28 cm.
Cover title: 1982 Devon Island Archaeology Project.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 11293.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The north coast of Devon Island, from Cape Hardy west to Truelove Inlet, represents one of several possible 'migration corridors' connecting the central Canadian Arctic coast with Greenland. There is good reason to expect, therefore, that the material remains of pioneering early Paleoeskimo and early Thule Culture groups exist within the study area. ... Data on 59 discrete sites were rediscovered. Preliminary synthesis of these data have revealed the presence of at least four sub-stages of the Arctic Small Tool tradition, perhaps three sub-stages of the Thule Culture tradition and a Recent Inuit component. Further re-working of the results of the 1982 field season suggest that a bimodal curve of occupational intensity can be documented with one peak occurring during the early/middle Pre-Dorset sub-stage and the second during the middle/late Thule sub-stage. Statistical analysis of the locational parameters of sites found in the Truelove Lowland area has shown that despite a very shallow isostatic emergence curve a correlation does occur between site elevation and relative age and that the majority of those sites without diagnostic attributes ... likely pertain to the Thule or Dorset periods. ... (Au)

U
Arctic Small Tool tradition; Dorset culture; Thule culture

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


A face from the past : an early Pre-Dorset ivory maskette from Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Helmer, J.W.
(À la frontière des sexes et des genres = On the border of genders. Études Inuit, v. 10, no 1-2, 1986, p. 179-202, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 28750.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In 1986 a small ivory carving of a human face was discovered at the Icebreaker Beach Site on northeastern Devon Island, N.W.T. in association with artefacts of an Early Pre-Dorset affiliation (circa 3900-3600 B.P.). The face portrayed is that of an elaborately tattooed elderly Asiatic woman. The maskette differs from Dorset depictions of the human face both stylistically and in the lack of overt symbolic content. Conceptual similarities, however, indicate that the Icebreaker Beach maskette is an early manifestation of an evolving Paleoeskimo artistic tradition that ultimately originated in the Bering Strait region or beyond. (Au)

U
Art; Artifacts; Inuit; Inuit archaeology; Ivory; Masks; Palaeoeskimo culture; Pre-Dorset culture

G0813
Canadian Arctic Islands; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Palaeo-Eskimo prehistory of the north Devon lowlands   /   Helmer, J.W.
(Arctic, v. 44, no. 4, Dec. 1991, p. 301-317, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 32015.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic44-4-301.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1553
Libraries: ACU

In this paper the distinguishing characteristics of six chronologically discrete Palaeo-Eskimo occupations discovered in the North Devon Lowlands region of Devon Island, Northwest Territories, are summarized and their cultural/chronological positions briefly assessed. Observed variations in the intensity of occupation in the study area and major shifts in the extra-regional cultural affiliations of these six occupational episodes are discussed in reference to a high-mobility subsistence/settlement strategy model of High Arctic Palaeo-Eskimo socioecological adaptations. (Au)

U
Dorset culture; Inuit archaeology; Palaeoeskimo culture

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut


Compensatory growth response of High Arctic sedges to simulated grazing : effects of clipping frequency and provenance   /   Henry, G.   Reintjes, F.
In: Abstracts of the 18th Annual Arctic Workshop, April 13-15, 1989 : theme : Global environmental change and the Arctic. - Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Geography, 1989, [1] p.
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 43962.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In response to grazing, many grasses and sedges exhibit "compensatory" shoot growth. The extent and strength of this response in arctic sedges is poorly known. In 1987, shoots of three major wet sedge species (Carex aquatilis stans, C. membranacea, and Eriophorum angustifolium triste) were harvested from meadows at three sites in the Canadian High Arctic: Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island (79 N); Truelove Lowland, Devon Island (76 N); and Polar Bear Pass, Bathurst Island (74 N). The shoots were transplanted into clay pots (1/pot) and established in a growth chamber at the University of Alberta Phytotron. For the experiment, plants were grown at 10 C with 24 h light, and were kept well watered. Three treatments were randomly applied to each species from each site: clipped once; clipped twice (second clipping 11 d after the first); and non-clipped control. After 56 d all pots were harvested, and the shoots dried and weighed. The results were complex and somewhat inconclusive. Carex aquatilis stans appeared to show compensatory growth when clipped once, but only in those plants from Alexandra Fiord and Polar Bear Pass. Carex membranacea did not show compensatory growth regardless of provenance. Eriophorum triste from Truelove Lowland showed compensatory growth in response to a single clipping, whereas no clear response was found in shoots from the other two sites. These results are discussed in relation to the history and current use of each site by large herbivores (e.g. muskoxen). (Au)

I, H, J
Animal distribution; Animal food; Environmental impacts; Grazing; Muskoxen; Plant growth; Sedges

G0813
Alexandra Fiord region, Nunavut; Polar Bear Pass, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Floristic analysis of High Arctic sedge meadows   /   Henry, G.H.R.   Svoboda, J.
In: Abstracts of the 16th Arctic Workshop : research on the roof of the world, Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, April 30 - May 2, 1987. - Edmonton, Alta. : Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, University of Alberta, 1987, p. 56-59, ill.
Abstract only.
Reference.
ASTIS record 44798.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Wet-mesic sedge meadows are one of the most distinctive plant community types in the High Arctic. However, the degree of the floristic similarity of meadows in different locations has not been objectively assessed, i.e. by using multivariate ordination techniques. This paper presents results of a principal components ordination of species values from three high arctic sedge meadow localities. Plant cover and frequency were measured in meadow stands at Alexandra Fiord (78 53 N, 75 55 W) and Sverdrup Pass (79 09 N, 79 10 W) in east-central Ellesmere Island. Species prominence values ... were calculated and used in the principal components analysis (PCA). Prominence values calculated by Muc (1976) for meadows at Truelove Lowland, Devon Island (75 33 N, 84 40 W) were also used in the PCA. ... When the prominence value of moss was added to the matrix, the PCA clearly separated Alexandra Fiord (A) stands from those of Sverdrup Pass and Truelove Lowland (B) (Fig. 2). The first two components accounted for 86% of the variance. Moss prominence was the most important factor separating stands along the first axis .... The Alexandra Fiord meadows had low moss cover (10-35%), while meadows at Sverdrup and Truelove had a nearly continuous (100%) understory of moss. The low moss cover at Alexandra Fiord is probably due to the lack of grazing disturubance by herbivores such as muskoxen, caribou and snowgeese. ... (Au)

H, I, J
Animal distribution; Environmental impacts; Grazing; Mosses; Plant cover; Plant distribution; Plants (Biology); Sedges; Wetlands

G0815
Alexandra Fiord region, Nunavut; Sverdrup Pass, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Variation in performance, cover, and density of Salix arctica on raised beach ridges of Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Hewitt, N.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1992.
91 p.
Thesis (B.A.) - University of Western Ontario, Dept. of Geography, London, Ont., 1992.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 33031.
Languages: English

Salix arctica (Arctic willow) was examined on seven raised beach ridges of the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, to determine differences in performance, density, and percent cover and to relate these differences to microenvironment. Performance was indicated by measures of reproductive effort and growth, including catkin number, total branch length and size per plant. Variation in these willow characteristics was compared between beach ridges for both crests and slopes. Variation of willow characteristics on beach crests was correlated with soil and microtopographical information. The results indicate that willow performance was best on slopes. Significant variation in willow characteristics occurred between ridge-crests and was positively correlated with the percent of large surface stones and the percent of fine soil material and organic matter. Stones are thought to provide wind protection for willows and the fine material and organic matter are controls of soil moisture and nutrients. It is suggested that, in the more extreme crest environment, plants are more responsive to minor differences in microenvironment than those on slopes. (Au)

H, C, E, J
Arctic willows; Beaches; Erosion; Gravel; Microclimatology; Plant growth; Plant-soil relationships; Primary production (Biology); Soil moisture; Theses; Winds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Paleo-environmental record preserved in Holocene palsa, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Heyes, A.
Paper presented at the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, November 18-19, 1986.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28347.
Languages: English

Glacio-isostatic rebound over the last 10,000 years in the vicinity of Truelove Inlet, Devon Island has resulted in the creation of an area of emerged coastal lowlands containing a sequence of raised beaches and interdigitated lakes. In places, the progressive accumulation of organic and inorganic sediments within these lakes has led to the formation of ice-cored palsa when the lakes were uplifted and drained. Given the age of these palsa the possibility exists that the former lacustrine sediments contain a record of much of the environmental change that has occurred within the coastal lowlands during the Holocene. The major objective of this study is to examine the record of Holocene paleo-environmental changes preserved in these sediments through an investigation of the pollen spectra and sediment geochemistry. To this end three palsa were cored in the coastal lowlands during the summer of 1986 using a Livingstone piston corer. Located at elevations of 6.8 m, 29.8 m and 56.5 m AMSL and based on published isostatic rebound curves for the area, the palsa are estimated to have begun forming approximately 4,000, 7,400 and 8,500 years ago respectively. The longest core, with a length of 2.62 m, was obtained from the highest palsa which has also yielded a basal date of 6.900 + 115 years B.P. (S-428). Analysis of the cores is presently underway, beginning with the determination of sediment pH, carbonates, rare earth elements, and trace elements on increment samples from each of the cores. (Au)

B, A
Beaches; Coast changes; Composition; Geochemistry; Geological time; Palaeogeography; Palsas; Recent epoch; Sea level; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology); Trace elements

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Climate and energy exchange on a sub-polar ice cap in summer : Arctic Institute of North America Devon Island Expedition, 1961-1963. Part A. Physical climatology   /   Holmgren, B.
Uppsala, Sweden : Uppsala Universitet, 1971.
83 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Meddelanden fran Uppsala Universitets Meteorologiska Institution, nr.107)
References.
ASTIS record 43107.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The analysis is based on climatological and micro-meteorological measurements made mainly at an elevated observation-place (Ice Cap Station, 1.3 km above M.S.L.) in the area of superimposed ice formation on the north-west slope of the ice cap. Comparative measurements were temporarily made in different parts of the ice cap. The structure of the wind-field over the ice cap, especially in situations with katabatic winds, was investigated by means of pilot balloons. In the middle of the summer the low-lying parts of the ice cap and the outlet glaciers are invaded by air of temperatures above freezing. Since the temperature of the ice cannot rise further than to melting-point, an advection inversion develops above the surface. Over the high-lying parts of the ice cap the air temperature in general stays well below freezing. Here the radiation climate is the factor which dominates the temperature stratification in the surface layer. At Ice Cap Station the conditions are intermediate in this respect; air temperatures above freezing were obtained in about 40% of all temperature readings at screen level in July. ... [Special attention is given to the measurement of air temperature, winds on the ice cap, air humidity, clouds and fog.] (Au)

E, F
Arctic Institute of North America; Atmospheric humidity; Atmospheric temperature; Climate change; Clouds; Effects of ice on climate; Expeditions; Fog; Glaciology; Ice caps; Measurement; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Research; Winds

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Climate and energy exchange on a sub-polar ice cap in summer : Arctic Institute of North America Devon Island Expedition, 1961-1963. Part B. Wind- and temperature-field in the low layer on the top plateau of the ice cap   /   Holmgren, B.
Uppsala, Sweden : Uppsala Universitet, 1971.
43 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Meddelanden fran Uppsala Universitets Meteorologiska Institution, nr.108)
References.
ASTIS record 43108.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Observations of the vertical variation of wind speed in near-neutral stratifications show an increase of the roughness parameter z subscript o from about .00005 to .001 m when the wind speed at the 5 m level decreases from 6-7 m/sec to 2-3 m/sec. The increase of z subscript o is suggested to be related to the flow conditions of the surface relief in the observation area. A comparison of the vertical variation of wind speed with the "log-linear" equation by Monin and Obukhov gives average values of the parameter alpha 1 (=KH/DM alpha) amounting to 6-7, when the stability, as expressed by the Richardson number, is less than ca 0.15. With increasing stability the deviations from a log-linear relationship becomes increasingly apparent. Furthermore, the vertical variation of temperature and wind speed in situations with very stable stratifications suggests that the similarity theory by Monin-Obukhov is not applicable, at least not for the local conditions. With great temperature differences between the upper and lower levels of the mast there are often indications of sharp inversions or thermo-clines at an intermediate level above the snow surface. Possible causes of the observed profile features, especially the influence of the local conditions, are discussed. (Au)

E, F
Arctic Institute of North America; Atmospheric temperature; Effects of ice on climate; Expeditions; Flow; Fog; Glaciology; Ice caps; Icing; Mathematical models; Measurement; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Microclimatology; Research; Surface properties; Winds

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Climate and energy exchange on a sub-polar ice cap in summer : Arctic Institute of North America Devon Island Expedition, 1961-1963. Part C. On the katabatic winds over the north-west slope of the ice cap. Variations of the surface roughness   /   Holmgren, B.
Uppsala, Sweden : Uppsala Universitet, 1971.
43 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Meddelanden fran Uppsala Universitets Meteorologiska Institution, nr.109)
References.
ASTIS record 43109.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

When the surface consisted of fine-grained frozen snow in spring, the z0-values on the average amounted to ca. 0001. m. At the end of the ablation-seasons, when the surface consisted of large melting ice grains (diameter 1-3 cm), z0-values of ca. .001 cm may be considered as representative. The surface at Ice Cap Station was inclined ca. 2° to the horizontal. In situations with light winds aloft and a surface inversion amounting to more than a couple of degrees Celsius as measured between the 0.1 and 9.5 m levels of the meteorological mast it was generally found that a katabatic flow prevailed in the surface layer. Contrary to ordinary gradient winds in the surface layer the katabatic winds are characterized by a rapid decrease with height of the shearing stress; i.e. the component along the fall-line of the slope. Together with other properties of the katabatic winds (see below) this had important bearings on the turbulent structure and therefore also the structure of the inversions over the main part of the ice cap. During "radiation nights" with strong inversions a thermo-cline generally appeared at approximately the same height as the wind maximum in the vertical; the tendency to formation of thermo-clines was more pronounced over the sloping surface at Ice Cap Station than over the quasi-horizontal surface in the top region of the ice cap. The visual observations as well as the profile observations indicated that the turbulent mixing between the cold air below the thermo-cline and the warm air above was markedly reduced or extinguished. Since the thermo-cline reduced the vertical turbulent transport of heat and since the wind speed was relatively high (typically ca 3 m/sec at the 1 m level) the turbulence in the cold air next to the surface was relatively intense. The stratification in the lowest metre or metres could generally be described as near-neutral or moderately stable in simulations when the total surface inversions amounted to more than, say 10 C. The profile measurements showed that the vertical variation of wind speed and temperature approached a logarithmic law with decreasing height. Deviations from an exactly logarithmic variation could however, generally be observed below the 1 m level. The stability conditions in situations with katabatic flow and the magnitude of the forces influencing the air in the inversion layer over the sloping surface are discussed. An analytical description of the profiles in the lowest layer above the snow-surface is given together with equations for the vertical heat flux during inversion conditions. A comparison of the vertical heat flux determined over the quasi-horizontal surface of the top plateau with the heat flux obtained at Ice Cap Station is also included. (Au)

E, F
Ablation; Arctic Institute of North America; Atmospheric temperature; Blowing snow; Effects of ice on climate; Expeditions; Glaciology; Ice caps; Mathematical models; Measurement; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Physical properties; Research; Slopes; Snow; Solar radiation; Surface properties; Winds

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Climate and energy exchange on a sub-polar ice cap in summer : Arctic Institute of North America Devon Island Expedition, 1961-1963. Part D. On the vertical turbulent fluxes of water vapour at Ice Cap Station   /   Holmgren, B.
Uppsala, Sweden : Uppsala Universitet, 1971.
29 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Meddelanden fran Uppsala Universitets Meteorologiska Institution, nr.110)
References.
ASTIS record 43110.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The vertical turbulent flux of water vapour E at the snow surface is calculated by means of three-hourly determinations of 1. wind speed at low level (0.5-1.0 m); 2. water-vapour pressure at 1.5 m; 3. temperature profiles for indirect determination of the temperature and water-vapour pressure at the snow surface. The temperature of the snow surface is determined by extrapolation of temperature-profiles down to the snow surface. The method is "calibrated" by reference to the conditions over melting snow. Humidity profiles measured with Assmann psychrometers at different levels are also utilized in the analysis of the humidity-field in the layer below the 1.5 m level. The calculations of E are furthermore based on a formula for the vertical variation of KM, which was developed in Part C. It is assumed that KM ~= KE in the layer considered (z<1.5 m). This assumption should be reasonable bearing in mind that relatively indifferent stability conditions usually prevail in the lowest layer at Ice Cap Station also in situations with strong inversions. The discussion includes a comparison with a semi-empirical model suggested by Sverdrup. The variations of E in different weather situations are described. During the relatively warm summer of 1962 the net evaporation amounted to 0.4 cm (w.e.). During the relatively cold summer of 1963 the net evaporation was 1.4 cm.(w.e.). (Au)

E, F
Arctic Institute of North America; Atmospheric humidity; Atmospheric temperature; Effects of ice on climate; Energy budgets; Evaporation; Expeditions; Glaciology; Ice caps; Mathematical models; Measurement; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Microclimatology; Research; Snow; Surface properties; Thermal properties; Water vapour; Winds

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Climate and energy exchange on a sub-polar ice cap in summer : Arctic Institute of North America Devon Island Expedition, 1961-1963. Part E. Radiation climate   /   Holmgren, B.
Uppsala, Sweden : Uppsala Universitet, 1971.
111 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Meddelanden fran Uppsala Universitets Meteorologiska Institution, nr.111)
References.
ASTIS record 43111.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In spring practically all surfaces in the Devon Island region are covered with snow which is very pure and which has a high albedo (80-90%). In summer the snow is generally removed by melting except in the highest parts of the ice cap, where discontinuous melting occurs during short periods only. The radiation climate is subject to a profound change in connection with the snow melt on and outside the ice cap. The main topic of this paper is the relationship between the variations of the radiation fluxes and the albedo at an observation-place on the north-west slope of the ice cap at an altitude of 1.3 km above M.S.L. and at a distance of ca 10 km from the margin of the ice cap. The radiation climate is described by means of measurements with the Angstrom pyrheliometer, two standard models of pyranometers (Eppley and Moll-Gorczynski), the Beckman & Whitley net radiometer and also photo-cells in combination with filters. The photo-cells are used for determinations of the albedo, the penetration of light from different parts of the sky. Considerable difficulties have been experienced in the analysis of the radiation data. Because of a failure with a recording potentiometer only instantaneous measurements of the radiation fluxes have been obtained. However, the instantaneous measurements were made regularly and are available in a relatively large number. The greatest troubles were caused by errors in the measurements with some of the standard instruments. In connection with the measurements of the direct solar intensity simultaneous calibrations of the Eppley and Moll-Gorczynski pyranometers were made. When applying Liljequist's method for calculation of the calibration constants for radiation from a clear and an overcast sky respectively it was found that the outputs of the Eppley pyranometer were subject to substantial errors. Various experiments were carried out to elucidate the causes of the errors and to determine the corrections required to get usable results. All measurements with the Beckman & Whitley net radiometer were rejected in connection with a discussion of the sources of error. The values of the net radiation given here are therefore partly determined by indirect methods. As to the rest of the contents it may be mentioned that, because of the pure air (Beta~=0.015) over the ice cap, an opportunity is given to discuss the absorption by water vapour in an atmosphere which is almost free from light-scattering aerosols. In some respects the results of the pyrheliometric measurements given here differ from the results of previous measurements in the polar regions. A proposal is made to improve the Angstrom-Hoelper method for determining the turbidity parameters Beta and W. (Au)

E, F
Albedo; Arctic Institute of North America; Atmospheric humidity; Atmospheric temperature; Clouds; Effects of ice on climate; Energy budgets; Expeditions; Glaciology; Ice caps; Mathematical models; Measurement; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Microclimatology; Research; Snow; Solar radiation; Surface properties; Thermal properties; Water vapour

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Climate and energy exchange on a sub-polar ice cap in summer : Arctic Institute of North America Devon Island Expedition, 1961-1963. Part F. On the energy exchange of the snow surface at Ice Cap Station   /   Holmgren, B.
Uppsala, Sweden : Uppsala Universitet, 1971.
53 p., 5 p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
(Meddelanden fran Uppsala Universitets Meteorologiska Institution, nr.112)
References.
ASTIS record 43112.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Micro-meteorological measurements at an observation-place situated at 1.3 km above M.S.L. on the north-west slope of the Devon Island ice cap are utilized to study the interplay between the energy transfers above and below the snow surface in various weather situations. The calculation of the energy budget is checked by summing up all energy fluxes during three observation-periods covering the summers of 1962 and 1963. The difference between the sum of all energy sources and the sum of all energy sinks appeared to be of the same order of magnitude as the expected measuring errors. By means of temperature-depth profiles observed at short time-intervals the mechanisms of energy transport within the frozen as well as the melting snow pack are discussed. Special attention is given to the development of melt-water streams because of their vital role in the ablation process: Among other factors the rate of melting is important for the formation of melt-streams. The evaporation was found to be small. A necessary but not sufficient condition for more noticeable melting on a sub-polar ice cap is that the air temperature rises above freezing. Advection of warm air is the initiating (and also the maintaining) factor in the melting process. The total annual accumulation and the total annual ablation are of a small order of magnitude; less than ca 25 cm (w.e.) during the three budget years when the studies were undertaken. In fact, it was found that a few days with relatively strong melting could be of decisive importance for the outcome of the annual mass balance. The greatest energy incomes and also the greatest rates of melting (2-3 cm w.e. per day) were always observed on days with strong winds and advection of warm and humid air over the ice cap. This weather type typically appeared in connection with frontal cyclones causing advances of warm air from the south-to-west sector as seen from the ice cap. Air temperatures above freezing were furthermore generally observed, when extensive warm-cored anticlyclones dominated the weather conditions during the main summer-period. However, the rates of melting in the high-lying areas of the ice cap were small during fine-weather periods. ... Glaciological observations by Koerner (1966) indicated that the cyclones over Baffin Bay in autumn and winter caused a marked increase of the accumulation on the east-to-south side of the ice cap. The Baffin Bay cyclones therefore seem to favour glacierization on Devon Island, no matter the season when they appear. (Au)

E, F
Ablation; Arctic Institute of North America; Atmospheric temperature; Boundary layers; Effects of ice on climate; Energy budgets; Expeditions; Glaciology; Heat transmission; Ice caps; Mathematical models; Measurement; Melting; Meteorological instruments; Meteorology; Research; Snow; Surface properties; Synoptic climatology; Temperature; Winds

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Gravity measurements on the Devon Island Ice Cap and an adjoining glacier   /   Hyndman, R.D.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 5, no. 40, 1965, p. 489-496, ill., map)
References.
ASTIS record 44355.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Gravity measurements have been used to determine ice thicknesses across the western part of the Devon Island ice cap in the Canadian Arctic. A detailed profile of the ice-cap edge and a profile across an adjoining glacier are also given. The ice cap has been found to have a largely rock core with ice thicknesses generally less than 500 m A deep valley has been found in the bedrock beneath the ice cap some 15 km from the start of a draining glacier. The measured depths on the ice cap should be within 15 per cent and those on the glacier within 20 per cent of the true values. (Au)

F
Gravity measurement; Ice caps; Thickness

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Palynological analysis of a peat from Truelove Lowland   /   Jankovska, V.   Bliss, L.C.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 139-142
References.
ASTIS record 16633.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Because of logistic difficulties, the generally shallow nature of peats, and the problems of interpreting the meager pollen profiles, the recent history of vegetation in the High Arctic is little known (Nichols 1974). Peat depths in most sedge-moss lowlands are only 10 to 50 cm and in uplands, seldom more than 1 to 3 cm. Peats more than 1 to 2 m in depth seldom occur, thus greatly reducing potential areas that can be analyzed for past vegetation-climatic conditions. The age of basal peats was determined at three sites in the Lowlands by Barr (1971). They ranged in age from 6,900 ± 115 years B.P. in the Truelove Valley, 4,300 ± 95 years B.P. for peats along Beschel Creek, and 2,450 ± 90 years B.P. in ice-centre polygons 1 km SW of Base Camp. The latter site was cored for samples. The objective of the study was to determine pollen and plant material content throughout the limited depth of the profile and to compare these results with those of other high arctic areas. (Au)

B, H
Palynology; Peat

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Immobilizing and marking wild muskoxen in arctic Canada   /   Jonkel, C.J.   Gray, D.R.   Hubert, B.
(The Journal of wildlife management, v. 39, no. 1, Jan. 1975, p. 112-117, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 38889.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/3800473
Libraries: ACU

During 1970-72, 26 wild muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus Zimmermann) were captured on Bathurst, Devon, and northern Ellesmere islands, NWT, Canada, using helicopters and Cap-Chur drugging equipment. Animals were immobilized with a mixture of 60 to 100 mg of succinylcholine chloride and varying amounts of promazine hydrochloride. Dosages were based on estimated body weight (1 mg/3 kg). Muskoxen were marked with paint, plastic and metal eartags, plastic streamers fastened to the horns by metal hose clamps, and numbered radio collars. Disturbance by the helicopter appeared to be a potential hazard through disruption of herd cohesiveness. Muskoxen should not be immobilized and tagged where predators are numerous or when young calves are present. (Au)

I, L, J
Aircraft disturbance; Animal behaviour; Animal live-capture; Animal tagging; Environmental impacts; Helicopters; Muskoxen; Radio tracking of animals

G0813
Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Goodsir Inlet region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Calculations of permafrost thickness   /   Judge, A.S.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 26-30, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16618.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The simplest model of the thermal condition of the earth's crust is to consider a semi-infinite homogeneous body with a constant surface temperature and a constant terrestrial heat flow from below. In this case the surface temperatures, and hence the permafrost thickness, are dependent only on the above factors and the thermal conductivity of the rocks present .... (Au)

C
Mathematical models; Permafrost; Thickness

G16


Relationship between climate, ablation, and run-off on the Sverdrup Glacier, 1963, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Keeler, C.M.
Montreal : Arctic Institute of North America, 1964.
viii, 80, [54] p., 23 leaves of plates : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Research paper - Arctic Institute of North America, no. 27)
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 32793.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This study is an attempt to account for short term disagreements between the amounts of: 1) ablation calculated from an energy balance study, 2) ablation calculated from surface lowering measurements, and 3) ablation calculated from measurements of discharge of a supra-glacial stream. An analysis of errors indicates that instrumental and measurement errors may be as great as 50% of the quality of ablation measured. Despite this fact it is still possible to correlate the short term error between all methods with climatic conditions. On clear days internal melt of the ice causes gross density changes not reflected in the surface lowering figure. Methods of measuring mass change directly were studied and shown more adequately represent daily ablation than do measurements of surface lowering alone. The measurement if discharge by the dilution method is shown to be the most accurate means of assessing true ablation on an Arctic Glacier. (Au)

E, F
Ablation; Coring; Effects of climate on ice; Energy budgets; Glaciers; Heat transmission; Melting; Meteorology; Winds

G0813
Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut


Soil development on a chronosequence of raised beaches, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Kelly, P.
Paper presented at the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, November 18-19, 1986.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28348.
Languages: English

A chronosequence of soils is located on a series of raised beaches in the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, NWT. These raised beaches, ranging in age from the present to approximately 9,500 years B.P. have formed in response to isostatic uplift of the lowland following the conclusion of the last Ice Age. These beaches provide an excellent chronological dating control and the ages of many have previously been determined using C-14 dating techniques on whalebone, driftwood and basal peat. Thirteen additional whalebone samples were obtained in the summer of 1986 and await dating. 288 bulk soil samples were collected from 96 pits on 24 of the raised beaches along two transects stretching from the present coastline to the upper marine limit. Three samples were obtained from each beach at three depths. These samples are currently being analyzed for such properties as pH, percent total nitrogen, sand, silt and clay, organic carbon, exchangeable bases and extractable Fe and Al. The analytical results will be subjected to an analysis of variance to determine variances attributable to differences in the ages of the sites, and in depth, together with variances on individual beaches, thus providing a better understanding of the temporal and spatial variation of soils and soil forming processes in this area of the High Arctic. (Au)

C, A
Age; Beaches; Coast changes; Formation; Geological time; Sea level; Soil chemistry; Soils

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Factors controlling soil development on a sequence of raised beaches, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Kelly, P.E.   King, R.H.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 27, no. 1, Feb. 1995, p. 54-71, maps, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 59655.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1552068
Libraries: ACU

A random stratified sampling design was used on soils formed on the crests of a sequence of raised beaches in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., to determine if time is the principal factor in soil development. Two hundred and eighty-eight bulk soil samples were collected from three depth intervals on 24 beaches; 14 soil properties were determined for each sample. An analysis of variance showed that most soil properties varied systematically and not by error or inherent random variations within and among beaches. Regression modelling and cluster analysis, however, revealed that soil development was discontinuous and not a direct function of time, while canonical discriminant analysis revealed that soil properties associated with parent material weathering were the principal discriminating variables. A random sample of the stone fraction revealed that, regardless of age, soils formed on beaches dominated by calcareous lithologies had developed a fine-textured and organic-rich solum, while the sola formed on beaches dominated by metamorphic and igneous lithologies are coarse textured and more poorly developed. Beach lithologies in Truelove Lowland appear to have been controlled by the lithology of adjacent rock outcrops that were progressively exposed to marine action at the time of coastal emergence. Consequently, parent material, not time, has been the principal factor influencing the degree of pedogenesis on this sequence of beaches. (Au)

C, A, B, D, F
Age; Beaches; Bottom sediments; Clay; Coasts; Cores; Density; Erosion; Formation; Geology; Glacial deposits; Ice caps; Ice wedges; Lakes; Melting; Palaeogeography; Palaeopedology; Physical properties; Radiocarbon dating; Recent epoch; Rocks; Salt marshes; Sand; Sea level; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology); Silt; Soil chemistry; Soil classification; Soil pH; Soil profiles; Soil surveys; Soil texture; Soils; Stratigraphy; Weathering

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Sexual differences in temperatures of blossoms on a dioecious plant, Salix arctica : significance for life in the Arctic   /   Kevan, P.G.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 22, no. 3, 1990, Aug. 1990, p. 283-289)
References.
ASTIS record 59639.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1551591
Libraries: ACU

The arctic willow (Salix arctica) is dioecious and the catkins of each sex are easy to distinguish, being staminate and pistillate. Pistillate catkins are retained for the entire arctic summer as the fruits mature and the seeds are finally released. The catkins are effective absorbers of solar radiation and temperatures within the catkins of each sex differ. Generally, those of the female plants are warmer than those of male plants and there may be freer flow of warm air in staminate catkins. These differences can be explained, in part, by the greater size and bulk of the pistillate catkins, and the greater density (albeit of somewhat shorter hairs) of pubescence. It is estimated that catkins of both sexes obtain additional heat units of up to about 50%, the pistillate catkins about 20% more than the staminate ones, early in the sunny part of the summer when pollination takes place, and the pistillate catkins obtain an additional 25% as they mature for the rest of the short and cloudier arctic summer. The direct importance of this for pollination is not evidenced through nectar characteristics (concentration of sugars), but would appear to be important for the catkin's maturation to sexual activity (pollen shedding, stigma receptivity and insect pollination) as one of the earliest blossoms of the summer. (Au)

H, E, J, I
Adaptation (Biology); Arctic willows; Atmospheric temperature; Density; Flowers; Gender differences; Heat budgets; Heat transmission; Insects; Measurement; Microclimatology; Plant anatomy; Plant growth; Plant reproduction; Seeds; Solar radiation; Temperature; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Holocene paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   King, R.H.
In: Abstracts of the 16th Arctic Workshop : research on the roof of the world, Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, April 30-May 2, 1987. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta, Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, 1987, p. 81-85
ASTIS record 28727.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Devon Island is the southeasternmost of the Queen Elizabeth Islands in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Truelove Lowland, with an area of approximately 43 km2, is the most westerly of a series of coastal lowlands on the northeastern coast of the island. Since the summer of 1985 a study has been underway of the paleoenvironmental record preserved in the surficial deposits of Truelove Lowland. The primary objective of this investigation has been a reconstruction of paleoenvironmental changes in comparison with the present conditions. This paper reviews the preliminary results of this work and the methodology being used. (Au)

B
Palaeogeography; Recent epoch

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Holocene palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   King, R.H.   Heyes, A.   Kelly, P.   Law, K.R.   Young, R.B.
In: Abstracts of the 16th Arctic Workshop : research on the roof of the world, Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, April 30 - May 2, 1987. - Edmonton, Alta. : Boreal Institute for Northern Studies, University of Alberta, 1987, p. 81-85
Abstract only.
References.
ASTIS record 44802.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Devon Island is the southeasternmost of Queen Elizabeth Islands in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Truelove Lowland, with an area of approximately 43 km², is the most westerly of a series of coastal lowlands on the northeastern coast of the island. Since the summer of 1985 a study has been underway of the paleoenvironmental record preserved in the surficial deposits of Truelove Lowland. The primary objective of this investigation has been a reconstruction of paleoenvironmental changes in comparison with the present conditions. This paper reviews the preliminary results of this work and the methodology being used. ... (Au)

A, B, D
Beaches; Glacial deposits; Palaeogeography; Pleistocene epoch; Quaternary period; Recent epoch; Sea level

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The long-term dynamics of a polar oasis, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   King, R.H.   Smith, I.R.   Young, R.B.
Paper presented at the International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change, University of Alaska Press, 1990.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 31108.
Languages: English

Possessing a distinctive local climate and underlain by continuous permafrost, the Truelove Lowland (75 33 N, 84 40 W) constitutes an isolated area of relatively high biological diversity in the midst of the more typical Polar Desert of the Canadian High Arctic. Much of the Lowland (approximately 22%) is presently covered by freshwater lakes and ponds. The larger of these lakes are sufficiently deep (7-8.5m) to contain stratified lake sediments. Sediment cores (2m long) have been analyzed for diatoms and chemical composition and reveal a stratigraphic record with sufficient resolution to permit a reconstruction of the long-term performance of this system. Following a late-glacial marine transgression which inundated the Lowland up to an elevation of 86m, lake development began approximately 9,700 years ago as a result of shallow marine lagoons isolated from the sea as a result of glacio-isostatic rebound. Following isolation, the lakes have been flushed with freshwater. The period of transition from marine to freshwater varies significantly in length in different lakes and appears to be strongly controlled by lake bathymetry and the prevailing rate of glacio-isostatic rebound. Molybdenum in the sediments appears to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of hypolimnetic anoxia at the time of lake isolation. Throughout the Holocene the lakes have remained oligotrophic and lake sedimentation has been dominated by variations in non-biogenic factors and particularly by variations in the influx of allochthonous materials from within the lake catchments. Over time, the progressive stabilization of surface materials and pedogenesis within the lake catchments has been marked by decreasing amounts of Cr, As and Na in the sediments and an increase in allochthonous Fe and Mn. (Au)

A, B
Bottom sediments; Composition; Coring; Diatoms; Formation; Lagoons; Oligotrophic lakes; Palaeogeography; Polar deserts; Recent epoch; Sea level; Sedimentation; Stratigraphy; Tundra ponds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Paleolimnology of the Truelove Lowland and adjacent areas, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   King, R.H.
In: 19th Arctic Workshop, March 8-10, 1990, INSTAAR, University of Colorado : program and abstracts. - Boulder, Colo. : INSTAAR, 1990, p. 41-42
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 43942.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Truelove Lowland (75 33 N, 84 40 W) is one of a series of lowlands on the northeastern coast of Devon Island. Possessing a distinctive local climate and underlain by continuous permafrost, the lowlands represent isolated areas of relatively high biological diversity in the midst of the more typical Polar Desert of the Canadian High Arctic. Much of the lowlands are presently covered by freshwater lakes and ponds. The larger of these lakes are sufficiently deep (7-8.5 m) to contain stratified lake sediments. Sediment cores, approximately 2 m long, from these lakes have been physically and chemically analyzed and the diatoms identified. The cores possess a stratigraphic record with sufficient resolution to permit a reconstruction of changes that have taken place both within the lakes and in the lake catchments. Based on the presence of distinctive diatom assemblages, biolithostratigraphic zones in the sediments are identified as comprising a basal marine zone representing the postglacial marine transgression, an intermediate and transitional brackish/marine zone representing the period when the lake became isolated from the sea and an upper freshwater zone representing more recent conditions. ... (Au)

B, A, F, I
Biology; Bottom sediments; Cores; Glacial epoch; Lakes; Petrology; Polar deserts; Sea level; Stratigraphy; Watersheds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Vegetation development on Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Knill, C.
Paper presented at the Geographical Interuniversity Resource Management Seminar, London, Ontario, December 4, 1987.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28728.
Languages: English

The raised beach ridges on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. form a series of steps of increasing age across the Lowland from the marine limit to the coast. The vegetation on these ridges should reflect different stages of successional development depending upon the age of the substrate and the location of the ridge on the Lowland. The physical and biological characteristics of each beach ridge were sampled during July and August 1987 using the line intercept method to determine the effects of substrate age and ridge location on the structure and composition of the vegetation. The beach ridges were grouped using Cluster Analysis based upon plant community characteristics. The oldest beach ridges high on the Lowland at the marine limit were distinctive because of their low and discontinuous plant cover. There was no distinctive age structure produced in the groups. It was concluded that the location of the beach ridge as it affects microclimate and soil conditions and not its age determines the vegetation on the raised beaches of Truelove Lowland. (Au)

H, A
Beaches; Effects of climate on plants; Microclimatology; Plant cover; Plant succession; Plants (Biology); Topography

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Snow freezes moments in time   /   Koerner, R.   Bourgeois, J.   Alt, B.
(Geos (Ottawa), v. 17, no. 2, Spring 1988, p. 1-5, ill. (some col.))
ASTIS record 42654.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... the main work of the Glaciology Section focuses on the cores they drill at the top of the ice caps. The drill melts the ice rather than cutting it; a heated annulus melts its way down at about 2 m an hour. Cores, brought up every 1.5 m, are measured, weighed, examined on a light table for structure and then cut into sections for various studies. ... What do these cores tell us? Perhaps the most important information is provided by the variation with depth of the oxygen isotope ratio in the ice and snow. Differences in the ratio of the two oxygen isotopes, 16 and 18, develop during the evaporation-deposition cycle: seawater evaporates in one place and is deposited as snow on an ice cap in another place. Put simply, the colder the climate, the lower the 18 O:16 O ratio becomes. This ratio therefore gives a clue to past temperatures, not just at the drill site but along the water-vapor path bringing the snow. ... Ice layers formed by summer melting and refreezing can be recognized as bubble-free ice in the cores as soon as they are laid on the light table. A record of these layers that goes back several thousand years is in effect a record also of summer warmth. The thicker the melt layers, the warmer the summer. Finally we can detect pollutants. Pollution is a loosely used term today; the atmosphere has never been completely free of aerosols (all airborne particles). They are picked up from the surface of the sea or land, blown into the air from vegetation and injected even into the stratosphere by volcanoes. Now industrial aerosols are being added to the atmospheric soup. Aerosols are in fact an essential part of the precipitation-forming process. ... Ice cores are also useful in establishing the natural aerosol concentration in the atmosphere. Concentrations of various aerosols in cores several thousands of years old do not include human (anthropogenic) pollution, except the slow effects caused by deforestation. These ancient background levels can be used as abaseline against which to judge increases in this century. ... (Au)

F, B, G, E, H
Accumulation; Air pollution; Chemical properties; Climate change; Cores; Flow; Glaciology; History; Ice caps; Mass balance; Melting; Ocean floors; Palaeoclimatology; Palynology; Pyroclastics; Snow; Water vapour

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands, N.W.T./Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut


The Devon Island Expedition 1960-64   /   Koerner, R.M.   Gill, A.   Apollonio, S.   Greenhouse, J.P.   Hyndman, R.D.
(Arctic, v. 16, no. 1, Mar. 1963, p. 57-76, ill., maps)
References.
ASTIS record 55398.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic16-1-57.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3523
Libraries: ACU

The establishment of the Arctic Institute's Devon Island Base Station and the progress of the research program in 1960 and 1961 were reported in brief summaries and preliminary field reports in Arctic 13:270-71 and 14:252-65, and a review of the research from September 1961 to September 1962 appeared in Arctic 15:317-320. Preliminary field reports for that period are presented here. ... (Au)

F, G, E, D, I

G0813, G0815
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Accumulation on the Devon Island ice cap, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Koerner, R.M.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 6, no. 45, 1966, p. 383-392, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 40951.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The pattern of accumulation on the Devon Island ice cap is described. There is an area of minimum accumulation encircling the highest part of the ice cap and 100-200 m. below it. Below this zone, accumulation gradually increases to a maximum near the ice-cap edge. The overall pattern is related to snow transport by katabatic winds. There is a regional accumulation pattern of high accumulation (ca. 40.0 cm. water equivalent) in the south-east part of the ice cap and an area of low accumulation (ca. 11.0 cm. water equivalent) in the north-west. This east-south-east to west-north-west accumulation gradient is related to cyclonic activity to the east in Baffin Bay, and it is probably intensified by the presence of open water in the same area. (Au)

F, E
Accumulation; Density; Ice caps; Snow; Thickness; Winds

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


The mass balance of the Devon Island ice cap, Northwest Territories, Canada, 1961-66   /   Koerner, R.M.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 9, no. 57, 1970, p. 325-336, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 40962.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Methods used in measuring the mass balance of the Devon Island ice cap are described. The use of dyes and melt trays is recommended in the superimposed-ice and firn zones of sub-polar glaciers. The north-west part of the ice cap was studied in most detail and has had a slightly negative net balance for the period 1961-66. An inverse relationship between mean net balance (bn) and elevation of the equilibrium line in the north-west part of the ice cap indicates that the mean net balance there would be zero with an equilibrium line at 920 m (±80 m) elevation. Accumulation on the ice cap is greatest in the south-east but the measurements suggest that the mean net balance, there is similar to the mean net balance on the rest of the ice cap. It is concluded that the present accumulation pattern must have existed for several hundreds, and possibly thousands of years. A study of firn stratigraphy and of variations in the elevation of the firn and equilibrium lines indicates that between 1961 and 1966 only 1962 had a more negative mean net balance than the average value for the period 1934-60. During the same 26 year period the net balance at 1 787 m elevation has varied, but summer conditions do not appear to have changed significantly. (Au)

F
Accumulation; Ice caps; Mass balance; Measurement

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Some observations on superimposition of ice on the Devon Island Ice Cap, N.W.T., Canada   /   Koerner, R.M.
(Geografiska annaler. Series A, Physical geography, v. 52A, no. 1, 1970, p. 57-67, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 42852.
Languages: English

The zone of superimposed ice formation is defined and divided into two sub-zones, one of continuous and the other of discontinuous superimposed ice deformation. Layering in superimposed ice is discussed and it is evident that an annual increment may consist of a series of layers which can occur in various orders according to the melt and freezing conditions obtaining. A laboratory analysis of superimposed ice did not reveal any valid method for division into annual layers. A crystal analysis indicates there is an increase in the mean crystal size and the standard deviation from this mean with decreasing altitude between the firn edge and the equilibrium line. Below the latter the pattern is reversed. This phenomenon is used to determine a long period equilibrium line. (Au)

F
Ablation; Crystals; Firn; Ice caps; Snow

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Devon Island ice cap : core stratigraphy and paleoclimate   /   Koerner, R.M.
(Science, v.196, no.4285, Apr. 1, 1977, p. 15-18, ill., map)
References.
ASTIS record 41323.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1126/science.196.4285.15
Libraries: ACU

... To explore further the paleoclimatic variations in the Canadian Arctic, the climate-stratigraphy approach has been used in a study of a series of three cores from the top of the Devon Island ice cap, at an elevation of 1800 meters above sea level, where accumulation is 220 kilograms per square meter per year in the form of firn, and melting occurs in about nine summers out of ten. Two of these cores were 20 m apart and penetrated to bedrock 299 m below the surface. The third, 300 m from the other two, was from the surface to a depth of 230 m. In addition, a series of 12-m surface cores from various locations in the Queen Elizabeth islands are considered. ... This valuable paleoclimatic information can be gained by studying the distribution of melt layers in deep ice cores. A profile representing the percentage of ice in melt layers in a core drilled from the Devon Island ice cap plotted against both time and depth shows that the ice cap has experienced a period of very warm summers since 1925, following a period of colder summers between about 1600 and 1925. The earlier period was coldest between 1680 and 1730. There is a high correlation between the melt-layer ice percentage and the mass balance of the ice cap. The relation between them suggests that the ice cap mass balance was zero (accumulation equaled ablation) during the colder period but is negative in the present warmer one. There is no firm evidence of a present cooling trend in the summer conditions on the ice cap. A comparison with the melt-layer ice percentage in cores from the other major Canadian Arctic ice caps shows that the variation of summer conditions found for the Devon Island ice cap is representative for all the large ice caps for about 90 percent of the time. There is also a good correlation between melt-layer percentage and summer sea-ice conditions in the archipelago. This suggests that the search for the northwest passage was influenced by changing climate, with the 19-century peak of the often tragic exploration coinciding with a period of very cold summers. (Au)

F, E, B
Climate change; Cores; Effects of climate on ice; Firn; Glacial melt waters; Glacial stratigraphy; Ice caps; Mass balance; Melting; Palaeoclimatology

G0813, G0815
Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut


Discontinuous flow, ice texture, and dirt content in the basal layers of the Devon Island ice cap   /   Koerner, R.M.   Fisher, D.A.
(Proceedings - Symposium on Glacier Beds : the Ice-Rock Interface, Ottawa, 15-19 August, 1978. Journal of glaciology, v. 23, no. 89, 1979, p. 209-221, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 3653.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU NFSMO

Surface-to-bedrock cores obtained with a CRREL thermal drill were taken in 1972 and 1973 from the top of the Devon Island ice cap. ... there are significant variations despite the fact that the cores were taken only 27 m apart. The variations, when analysed statistically, show that at least 25-30% of the originally continuous profile is missing from each core. Faulting within the near-bedrock ice may be responsible for some of the effect but bubble fabric also gives evidence for irregular non-laminar flow. Because of the strong relationship between crystal size and micro-particle concentration in the Devon Island cores, it is suggested that the fine-grained nature of dirty layers in the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets is due to the effect of the dirt inclusions and not of shearing. ... Clear ice near the bed is considered a tectonic feature, but the lack of effect on its bed by the ice cap confirms the non-erosional nature of an ice cap frozen to its bed. In terms of paleoclimatic history, it means that, because of bedrock effects, ice caps of intermediate depth (i.e. < 400 m) can give continuous information only over the last approximate 5000 years. Between 5000 and 10000 B.P. the time series becomes slightly discontinuous and beyond 10000 B.P. so discontinuous as to allow only broad climatic inferences to be drawn. (Au)

A
Composition; Cores; Flow; Glacial epoch; Ice caps; Impurities; Physical properties; Spatial distribution

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Delta 18O variations in snow on the Devon Island ice cap, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Koerner, R.M.   Russell, R.D.
(Canadian journal of earth sciences, v. 16, no. 7, July 1979, p.1419-1427, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 2799.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/e79-126
Libraries: ACU

A study of delta 18O variations of snow samples taken on traverses across the Devon Island ice cap in June 1971, 1972, and 1973 has shown a difference between the accumulation conditions on the southeast and northwest sides of the ice cap. On the southeast side there is an increasing depletion of 18O in the snow with increasing elevation. On the northwest side of the ice cap there is no evidence of any further depletion of 18O in snow .... (Au)

F
Ice caps; Oxygen-18; Spatial distribution

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Liquified natural gas tanker transport through Parry Channel and climatic change   /   Koerner, R.M.   Fisher, D.
[S.l. : s.n., 198-?].
16, 2, [15] leaves : ill., 1 map ; 29 cm.
Photocopy.
References.
ASTIS record 48561.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This report is concerned with the navigability of the channels in the Queen Elizabeth Islands, both now and in the future, with particular reference to the shipping of liquified natural gas (LNG) in ice-protected tankers. ... The Ice Physics Section of PCSP has for some years now been following a program of core-drilling in the Queen Elizabeth Islands ice caps. Three ice caps have been studied to date: ... Meighen Ice Cap (one 112 m hole), Devon Island Ice Cap (one 220 m hole and two 300 m holes), and Agassiz Ice Cap on Northern Ellesmere Island (one 337 m hole). All holes, with the exception of the 220 m on the Devon Island Ice Cap (DIIC) penetrated from surface to bedrock. The Meighen hole represents some 4,000 years of accumulation and melt and the other surface-bedrock holes more than 100,000 years. The ice caps contain, layer by layer, a continuous sequence of snowfalls and the dust, marine salts and, more importantly, the oxygen isotopes within them. Melting each summer is preserved as ice layers in the cores and by studying the cores we can delve back into past atmospheres and temperatures. By knowing what the climate has done in the past we can put the present into perspective and, with some caution, predict what the climate is going to do in the future. In this report we will make some comments on the effect the climatic change may have on sea-ice conditions, but our main intent is to present conclusions drawn from our ice core work to determine which way the climate is going. As our climatic time series do not incorporate the full impact of mankind on the environment, we also discuss to what extent these anthropogenic influences may upset our predictions. ... (Au)

E, B, F, J, L, Q
Atmospheric temperature; Carbon dioxide; Climate change; Climatology; Cores; Coring; Dust; Environmental impacts; Ice caps; Marine LNG transportation; Marine navigation; Melting; Palaeoclimatology; Pollen; Pollution; Sea ice; Stratigraphy; Tankers

G10, G081, G0813, G0815
Agassiz Ice Cap, Nunavut; China; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut; Parry Channel, N.W.T./Nunavut; Queen Elizabeth Islands waters, N.W.T./Nunavut; Upernavik, Greenland


Studying climatic change from Canadian High Arctic ice cores   /   Koerner, R.M.   Fisher, D.A.
(Climatic change in Canada 2 : National Museum of Natural Sciences project on climatic change in Canada during the past 20,000 Years / Edited by C.R. Harrington. Syllogeus - National Museum of Natural Sciences, no. 33, 1981, p. 195-218, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 7324.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The accumulation regions of ice sheets and ice caps are repositories of past atmospheres. ... if we take a core section in an area where the ice flow is least complex so that the accumulated layers are not mixed up by folding or faulting we can study both the changing temperature of condensation and atmospheric content back in time. ... The High Arctic Canadian ice caps span ... about 100,000 or 200,000 years. ... (Au)

E, F
Climate change; Climatology; Cores; Ice caps; Ice sheets

G0813, G10
Canadian Arctic Islands; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Greenland; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut


Granulite facies rocks on northeastern Devon Island, Arctic Archipelago   /   Krupicka, J.
[Ottawa] : Geological Survey of Canada, 1973.
41 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
(Paper - Geological Survey of Canada, 73- 8)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 31)
References.
ASTIS record 39993.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Rocks of the granulite facies occur on northeastern Devon Island in the Churchill Province of the Canadian Shield. These rocks probably represent elements of an Archean basement reworked during the Hudsonian Orogeny. The rocks are high-grade hypersthene-quartz-plagioclase gneisses grading into retrogressively metamorphosed amphibolite facies gneisses. The granulites together with the retrograded rocks constitute a metamorphic series marked by: alteration and disappearance of hypersthene; decrease in the amount and in the An-content of plagioclase; increase in the amount of potassium feldspar and the development of typical microcline; increase in the amount of biotite and, in the most regressed stages, of chlorite; tendency to increasingly inequigranular texture and porphyroblastesis; and a general trend towards more massive and granular texture and porphyroblastesis; and a general trend towards more massive and granite-like rocks. The whole process was essentially crystalloblastic, and only rarely has led to full-scale mobilization and capacity for intrusion. Retrogressive metamorphism, microclinization and granitization were more intense where the process was supported by strong mechanical reworking. The metamorphic complex is cut by younger diabase dykes, and is unconformably overlain by Cambrian sediments belonging to the eastern regions sandstone, and continues with mainly dolomitic rocks. (Au)

B
Dikes (Geology); Feldspar; Garnet; Gneiss; Metamorphic rocks; Petrography; Rocks; Sandstone; Sedimentary rocks

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Bedrock geology of the Truelove River area   /   Krupicka, J.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 63-72, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16630.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Truelove River area on the northeastern coast of Devon Island is underlain by two geological units: (1) the Canadian Shield, (2) the Arctic Platform. The crystalline rocks of the Shield outcrop in the Lowland, in the steep fault zone of the cliff south of the Truelove River, and in the lower part of the slope of the eastern plateau. The platform sediments build the eastern plateau and the Rocky Point, and form a shallow cover upon the basement rocks of the southern block. (Au)

B
Geology

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Colonization of Snow Bunting, Plectrophenax nivalis, nests by bumblebees, Bombus polaris, in the High Arctic   /   Kukal, O.   Pattie, D.L.
(Canadian field-naturalist, v.102, no. 3, July-Sept. 1988, p. 544)
References.
ASTIS record 31287.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Two instances of colonization, believed to be instances of usurpation, of Snow Bunting nests by Arctic Bumblebees were observed in the High Arctic on Devon Island, Northwest Territories. (Au)

I
Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Animal reproduction; Bees; Bird nesting; Snow Buntings

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Post-glacial coastal emergence, Devon Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago   /   Law, K.
Paper presented at the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, November 18-19, 1986.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28349.
Languages: English

In post-glacial times the northeastern coast of Devon Island, NWT experienced considerable glacio-isostatic rebound. Approximately 9,500 years B.P. deglaciation of the area was accompanied by a marine transgression which covered the coastal lowlands up to an elevation of approximately 80 m AMSL. Subsequent glacio-isostatic rebound associated with the diminishing extent and thickness of the local Devon Island Ice Cap has continued until the present day and has been accompanied by an apparently continuous marine regression. The result has been the progressive emergence of the coastal lowlands in the vicinity of Truelove Inlet and the creation of a set of raised beaches which rise in elevation from the present-day shoreline to the former marine limit. Through a detailed topographic survey based on an arbitrarily selected datum, the elevation of each identifiable raised beach has been established and mapped. With the aid of a calibration curve representing the rate of post-glacial coastal emergence and which takes into account the known changes in sea-level, as well as the height and radiometric ages of the raised beaches, the respective raised beach elevations have been converted into a series of isochrones. The result is a reconstruction of the progressive changes in the coastline of northeastern Devon Island during much of the Holocene. (Au)

A, B
Beaches; Coast changes; Deglaciation; Ice caps; Melting; Palaeogeography; Recent epoch; Sea level

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The postglacial emergence and isostatic uplift of Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Law, K.R.
London, Ont. : University of Western University, 1987.
1 v.
Thesis (B.Sc.) - University of Western University, Dept. of Geography, London, Ont., 1987.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28729.
Languages: English

The Truelove Lowland preserves a record of progressive beach development during the Holocene, as evidenced by the series of raised beaches that dominate the lowland from present day sea level up to a height of 86 m above sea level. This beach development is attributed to the post-glacial emergence and isostatic uplift of the lowland following deglaciation. The record of post-glacial emergence for the Truelove Lowland was obtained by examining the relationship between the age of the raised marine deposits to their precise elevation. A detailed leveling survey of the lowland allowed the height of the raised beaches to be correlated to radiocarbon age determinations of whalebone and driftwood samples collected from these raised beaches. The correlation is presented as a post-glacial emergence curve from which the age of marine limit, located at a height of 86 m, was determined to be 10295 years B.P. Examination of the post-glacial emergence curve indicates that the lowland emerged rapidly in the time period 10295 to 8000 years B.P. and emergence continued thereafter at a much more decelerated rate. (Au)

A, B
Age; Beaches; Deglaciation; Glacial epoch; Recent epoch; Sea level; Sediments (Geology); Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Finding our past in the present   /   Legat, A.   Hanks, C.
(Information north, v. 13, no. 2, Feb. 1987, p. 2, 4, ill.)
ASTIS record 21210.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Two unique projects now provide young northerners with opportunities to learn about science in a refreshing manner that many find more relevant to their backgrounds than stuffy classrooms. The Northern Heritage Research Project (NHRP) and the Drum Lake Archaeological Field School are designed to spark interest in learning while training students for employment as technical assistants and to prepare them for leadership roles in their home communities. NHRP is under the direction of the Northern Heritage Society and Drum Lake is run by the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. (Au)

U, T
Archaeology; Dene Indians; Drum Lake Archaeological Field School; Ethnology; Northern Heritage Research Project; Occupational training; Research

G0812, G0813
Norman Wells region, N.W.T.; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis in High Arctic forms of Nostoc commune   /   Lennihan, R.   Chapin, D.M.   Dickson, L.G.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 72, no. 7, July 1994, p. 940-945, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 55863.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b94-119
Libraries: ACU

Nostoc commune, a colonial cyanobacterium, has been suggested as an important contributor of nitrogen to terrestrial ecosystems in the Canadian High Arctic, yet little is known about the ecophysiology of this organism in arctic environments. This study focused on the physiological performance of macroscopic colonies of N. commune found on Devon Island, N.W.T. The objectives were to examine the influence of temperature, colony morphology, and seasonal phenology on nitrogen fixation rates and the effects of light and temperature on photosynthesis. Maximum rates of acetylene reduction in N. commune (2119 nmol C2H4/g/h) were higher than those previously recorded for arctic N. commune but lower than values reported for temperate poulations. Depending on the time of the growing season, the temperature optimum for acetylene reduction varied from 15°C to greater than 20°C. Photosynthetic temperature optima did not occur below 20-25°C (the highest temperatures measured). Light saturation of photosynthesis was reached at low levels of irradiance (100-150 µmol/m²/s PPFD). Acetylene reduction rates varied strongly with colony morphology. Thin, fragile, flattened colonies had higher rates than thicker, more resilient, flattened colonies or spherical colonies. Cold post-thaw temperatures appeared to delay the recovery of maximum nitrogen fixation rates for 2-3 weeks following the onset of the growing season. Compared with two other species of cyanobacteria present on Truelove Lowland (Gloeocapsa alpina and Gleotrichia sp.), N. commune had higher rates of nitrogen fixation. (Au)

H, J, E, C
Carbon; Chromatography; Cyanophyceae; Effects of temperature on plants; Growing season; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Photosynthesis; Plant growth; Plant respiration; Plant-soil relationships; Seasonal variations; Solar radiation; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Soil development in a High Arctic toposequence, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. = Développement de sol dans une toposéquence en Haute Arctique, Truelove Lowland, île Devon, T.N.-O.   /   Lev, A.
In: Fourth National Student Conference on Northern Studies : Conference programme and abstracts, Government Conference Centre, Ottawa, November 26-27, 1994 = Quatrième conférence nationale des étudiants en études nordiques : Calendrier des événements et sommaires, Centre de Conférence du Gouvernement, Ottawa, du 26 au 27 novembre 1994. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1994, p. [68]
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 36660.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

A soil toposequence on the foreslope of a 6,000 year old High Arctic raised beach is studied to determine the role of environmental factors on its development. Also of interest is the degree to which current environmental conditions are affecting solute and particulate transfer within the soils and the likelihood of identifying a record of past soil development from adjacent lake sediments. The toposequence ... [comprises] a gravelly Regosolic Static Cryosol (Ahk-Ck-Ckz) on the beach crest under a lichen-cushion plant association; a silt loam Brunisolic Turbic Cryosol (Ahk-Bmk-Ckz) on the hummocky foreslope and a waterlogged silty Gleysolic Turbic Cryosol (Ahk-Ckg-Ckz) in the sedge meadow at the foot of the slope. Currently, translocated silt from intense weathering of limestone clasts on the beach crest promotes cryoturbation in downslope brunisolic Cryosols where Fe and organic matter translocation results in a Bmk horizon. Pedogenic silt is accumulating in the lower slope sedge meadow under pronounced reducing conditions and solifluction. Complex soil development on this typical slope and the rapid throughput of solutes and particulate material suggest that an identifiable record of past soil formation exists in the lake deposits. (Au)

C, B, F
Beaches; Bottom sediments; Creep; Formation; Lakes; Silt; Soil percolation; Soil profiles; Soils

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Spatial variation of soil development in a High Arctic soil landscape : Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada   /   Lev, A.   King, R.H.
(Permafrost and periglacial processes, v. 10, no. 3, July-Sept. 1999, p. 289-307, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 47563.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-1530(199907/09)10:3<289::AID-PPP319>3.0.CO;2-Z
Libraries: ACU

Soil variability on a raised beach under conditions of continuous permafrost in the Truelove Lowland is controlled by a number of environmental factors operating at different scales. At the scale of the raised beach, the soil development is strongly controlled by slope conditions, resulting in the formation of a catena. Differences in the structure and composition of the beach materials, together with the prevailing soil hydrothermal regime and vegetative cover, produce a series of discrete soil zones on these beaches in which Regosolic Static Cryosols, Brunisolic Eutric Static Cryosols, Brunisolic Eutric Turbic Cryosols and Gleysolic Turbic Cryosols are associated with the raised beach crest, upper foreslope, lower foreslope and meadow zones respectively. Multivariate statistical analyses of soil properties sampled using a 4 x 4 m sampling grid, stratified according to depth, reveals significant soil variability within the zones of the catena. At this scale, small-scale changes in topography, periglacial processes and soil parent materials create specialized niches for plant growth and pedogenic processes, resulting in significant soil variability. Progressive decarbonation of the calcareous beach materials: the humification and cryoturbation of organic materials; the pedotranslocation of silts, solutes and exchangeable cations, both downprofile and downslope; together with very localized acid chelation, brunification and oxidation-reduction combine to produce a complex mosaic of soil conditions that can be mapped. (Au)

C, A, H, J
Beaches; Permafrost; Plant distribution; Slopes; Soil moisture; Soils; Thermal regimes

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Magnetic susceptibility tests of Arctic lake sediments   /   Loucks, T.M.J.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1992.
133 p.
Thesis (B.A.) - University of Western Ontario, Dept. of Geography, London, Ont., 1992.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 33032.
Languages: English

Magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses were performed on three sediment cores extracted from two High Arctic lakes, Immerk Lake and Middle Beschel Lake, in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. The purpose of the analyses were to test the reliability of differing magnetic susceptibility measurement techniques, to test the stratigraphic accuracy as a tool using geochemical analyses and to compare the results with current paleolimnologic knowledge about Truelove Lowland lakes. Results showed a high level of agreement between volume and mass magnetic susceptibility, although the level of agreement varied according to the type of sensor used. Magnetic susceptibility showed good agreement with the geochemical data, especially those elements which are considered to reflect changes in the intensity of erosion within the lake catchment, biological productivity and stratigraphy. Volume and mass magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed major and minor stratigraphic variations in the sediments which corresponded with previously identified lake development phases. Integration of the results indicated a paleolimnologic evolution of the lakes that is consistent with the results of previous research. (Au)

B, I
Biological productivity; Bottom sediments; Cores; Erosion; Geochemistry; Geomagnetism; Lakes; Palaeohydrology; Palaeontology; Stratigraphy; Theses

G0813
Beschel Lakes, Nunavut; Immerk Lake, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Spatial distribution of lemming mats in the Canadian High Arctic   /   Mallory, F.F.   Boots, B.N.
(Canadian journal of zoology, v. 61, no. 1, Jan. 1983, p. 99-107, figures, tables)
References.
ASTIS record 11214.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/z83-011
Libraries: ACU

Spatial distributions of lemming mats on exposed beach ridges on Bathurst and Devon islands, N.W.T., in the Canadian High Arctic were recorded by triangulation. The collared lemming Dicrostonyx groenlandicus is the only microtine in this region, which eliminates interspecific influences. In addition, vegetation is sparse, making centres of activity easy to identify. Mats were relatively permanent structures with a mean diameter of 3.88 m and an average of 13.0 m and an average of 13.0 burrows. The mean nearest neighbour distance ranged from 40 to 45 m and the average mat polygon area (interpreted as territory or home range) was 0.34 ha. Individual mat polygons were contiguous with an average of 5.3 other polygons and the distribution of the mats over the environment was nonrandom. The data support the conclusion that lemming mats represent core areas within lemming territories or home ranges which are distributed regularly over the environment because of social processes which influence social interaction. The data are discussed as they apply to current theories on microtine demography and population dynamics. (Au)

I
Animal behaviour; Animal distribution; Lemmings

G0813
Bathurst Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


CO2 assimilation by Dryas integrifolia on Devon Island, Northwest Territories   /   Mayo, J.M.   Despain, D.G.   van Zinderen Bakker, E.M.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 51, no. 3, Mar. 1973, p. 581-588, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 5)
References.
ASTIS record 38896.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b73-069
Libraries: ACU

In situ measurements of CO2 assimilation by Dryas integrifolia at different stages of development and under different environmental conditions were made on Devon Island, Northwest Territories. Dryas can fix CO2 in excess of respiration over a 24-h period under conditions of clear nights and cloudy days. The maximum net assimilation rate measured was 4.2 mg/g dry weight/h. The maximum amount of CO2 fixed in 24 h was 61.54 mg/g dry weight. Maximum net assimilation occurred at 8 to 10 C leaf temperatures. Positive net assimilation occurred at 1 C leaf temperature. Light compensation was shown to be less than 0.04 langley/min. Leaf temperatures were always greater than ambient. The maximum leaf temperature measured was 39 C. Net assimilation rates appear to decrease as the season progresses. (Au)

H, J, E, C
Atmospheric temperature; Beaches; Carbon dioxide; Dryas; Light; Meadows; Measurement; Microclimatology; Photosynthesis; Plant growth; Plant physiology; Plant reproduction; Plant respiration; Primary production (Biology); Sedges; Soils; Temperature; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Gas exchange studies of Carex and Dryas, Truelove Lowland   /   Mayo, J.M.   Hartgerink, A.P.   Despain, D.G.   Thompson, R.G.   van Zinderen Bakker, E.M.   Nelson, S.D.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 265-280
References.
ASTIS record 16643.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Field studies of photosynthesis were undertaken during the 1971 and 1972 field seasons with the following objectives in mind: (1) to determine the photosynthetic activity of some of the major plants under the environmental conditions prevailing in the islands of the High Arctic, particularly with respect to continuous light and low temperatures. These studies centered upon Dryas integrifolia, a major component of raised beach ridge communities, and Carex stans a dominant in meadows; (2) to determine seasonal changes in photosynthetic activity as the plants initiated growth, flowered, and formed seed; (3) to provide CO2 assimilation data for use in modelling of production processes by other participants in the project (see Whitfield this volume); (4) to compare photosynthetic activity of Canadian high arctic species with information from other polar regions; and (5) to gain sufficient information about the conditions under which the plants are photosynthetically active so that studies could be carried out in the Controlled Environment Facility in Edmonton, Alberta, under near natural conditions. (Au)

H
Beaches; Photosynthesis; Plant ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Pollen analysis of the 1973 ice core from Devon Island glacier, Canada   /   McAndrews, J.H.
(Quaternary research, v. 22, no. 1, July 1984, p. 68-76, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 41321.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1016/0033-5894(84)90007-3
Libraries: ACU

Meltwater from a 299-m-long ice core was filtered and analyzed for fossil pollen and spores. Pollen concentration was higher in the late Holocene and interglacial intervals (ca. 7/liter) than in the early Holocene and Wisconsinan (ca. 1-2/liter) ones. The late Holocene and interglacial assemblages were dominated by Alnus (alder), whereas the early Holocene and Wisconsinan ones were dominated by Betula (birch) and Artemisia (sage). During the Holocene and probably the late interglaciation, most of the pollen and spores were blown a minimum of 100 km from low arctic shrub tundra and adjacent subarctic Picea (spruce) forest; these areas were dominated by the arctic air mass during the summer pollinating season. During the Wisconsinan-early Holocene, glacier ice and arctic air were more widespread and pollen sources were more distant; thus, at this time relatively little pollen was incorporated into the ice. The Devon ice-core data suggest that there should have been pollen in the continental ice sheet of Wisconsin time. When the ice sheet retreated this pollen would be carried by meltwater and redeposited with silt and clay together with contemporary pollen, producing an ecologically anomalous assemblage. (Au)

B, H, F, A
Cores; Glacial epoch; Glacial melt waters; Glaciers; Palaeobotany; Palynology; Recent epoch

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Pollination and reproductive biology of three species of Arctic Pedicularis   /   Meier, S.L.
Guelph, Ont. : University of Guelph, 1989.
1 v.
Thesis (B.Sc.) - University of Guelph, London, Ont., 1989.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 30092.
Languages: English

A comprehensive study of the breeding biology of Pedicularis is lacking. In the High Arctic limited biological diversity and extreme unpredictability in the environment may be reflected in unique reproductive adaptations. The aim of this study was to determine the importance of entomophily in the sexual reproduction of Pedicularis. Plants received four treatments: (1) open for natural pollination, (2) bagged and unmanipulated, (3) bagged and hand-selfed, (4) bagged and crossed. The foraging behaviour of bees were recorded including the distance and angles flown between flowers, and behaviours on flowers. It was found that Pedicularis is self-compatible yet dependent on bees for pollen transfer. Those plants excluded from insects and not manipulated failed to produce capsules. The greatest seed set was produced through natural pollination followed by crossing then selfing. It is suggested this self-compatibility is an adaptive response to a very limited seed dispersal resulting in a high degree of relatedness between individuals within an area. (Au)

H
Adaptation (Biology); Animal behaviour; Bees; Plant ecology; Plant reproduction; Pollen; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Limnology of some lakes on Truelove Lowland   /   Minns, C.K.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 569-585, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16667.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Three lakes were investigated, Immerk, Fish, and Loon Lakes, accounting for 22.75% of the surface water in the Lowland. A broad spectrum of measurements was taken from mid-May to mid-August 1973, to obtain at least a qualitative measure of productivity. Most of the work was carried out on Immerk Lake. Comparisons are drawn primarily with data collected in the Canadian I.B.P. project on Char Lake, Cornwallis Island, a moderately deep arctic lake. (Au)

I, F
Fresh-water biology; Lakes

G0813
Char Lake, Nunavut; Immerk Lake, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Logistics activities of the Institute in 1963   /   Mogensen, P.
(Arctic, v. 17, no. 2, June 1964, p. 131-135, ill.)
ASTIS record 55300.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic17-2-131.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3496
Libraries: ACU

In addition to its many other activities the Institute has supported polar exploration through its manifold logistic activities. This work consists mainly in procuring, processing, and shipping material and equipment needed in the field; in providing support for outside projects under contract agreements and for work projects sponsored by the Institute itself; and the development of cold-weather clothing and trail gear. Under the terms of contracts with the U.S. National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Defense, and also for the support of projects sponsored by the Institute, a total of 435 purchase orders for supplies were issued during 1963. The items ordered ranged from clothing to major equipment and represented an outlay of $275,000. ... [Summarizes the Institute's support during 1963 for the U.S. Antarctic Research Program, the Icefield Ranges Research Program at Kluane Lake, the Devon Island Expedition (which terminated in Sept. 1963) and the development of cold weather clothing and tents.] (Au)

L, M, K

G01, G02, G0811, G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Kluane Lake region, Yukon; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Primary production of plant communities of the Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : sedge meadows   /   Muc, M.
In: Primary production and production processes, tundra biome / Edited by L.C. Bliss and F.E Wielgolaski. - Edmonton : Tundra Biome Steering Committee, 1973, p. 3-14, ill.
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 15)
(Canadian Committee for the IBP contribution, no. 259)
References.
Indexed from a photocopy.
ASTIS record 44362.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Sedge meadows are the predominant plant communities in the Truelove Lowland, occupying approximately 41% of the lowland ecosystem. In order to accurately describe the role of these meadows in the total bioenergetics of the Lowland, it was most practical to divide them into three main sedge meadow community types, even though a more thorough phytosociological treatment was already available .... Community refers to a unit of vegetation having a distinct pattern in the lowland ecosystem. Community type refers to two or more meadows possessing similar floristic and physiognomic features. The three main meadow community types have been designated as frost-boil sedge meadows, hummocky sedge meadows, and wet sedge meadows. One representative meadow of each type was chosen for quantitative studies, presented in this paper. A summarized comparison (Fig. 1) of the three meadow types illustrates their distinctiveness, degree of similarity, and prominence in this lowland ecosystem. ... (Au)

H, J, A, C
Frost boils; Hummocks; Meadows; Plant distribution; Plants (Biology); Primary production (Biology); Sedges

G0815
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Plant communities of Truelove Lowland   /   Muc, M.   Bliss, L.C.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 143-153, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16634.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The most detailed vegetation study in this Lowland was that of Barrett (1972). He recognized nine plant associations (phytogeocoenoses) grouped into seven Alliances using Braun-Blanquet methodology. The objectives of this study were to: 1. map the major habitats with associated plant communities onto air photos (1:5000) and transcribe this information onto a meterically corrected stereo-orthophoto map (plant community and soil map in folder); and 2. describe in general terms the structure (physiognomy) and floristic composition of the plant communities. (Au)

H
Plants (Biology); Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Ecology and primary production of sedge-moss meadow communities, Truelove Lowland   /   Muc, M.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 157-184
References.
ASTIS record 16635.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Although lowlands with sedge and grass dominated meadows cover less than 2% of the landscape in the Queen Elizabeth Islands (Babb and Bliss 1974), they constitute the most productive landscape unit in the High Arctic. Nutrient deficiencies, low temperatures, and a relatively short growing season all contribute to a relatively low standing crop and annual production in this vegetation type, compared with more temperate communities. A distinctive feature of the meadow communities is their retention of the majority of vascular biomass belowground (Dennis and Johnson 1970) and maintenance of a relatively uniform growth rate over the growing season (Tieszen 1972, Muc 1973). The objectives of this study were to determine plant communities, to determine aboveground and belowground net primary production within the three meadow community types present, to determine aboveground plant growth rates, and to relate carbohydrate, nutrient, and chlorophyll content to net production. (Au)

H
Biomass; Plant ecology; Plants (Biology); Primary production (Biology); Sedges

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Postglacial isostatic movement in northeastern Devon Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago   /   Muller, F.   Barr, W.
(Arctic, v. 19, no. 3, Sept. 1966, p. 263-169, ill.)
ASTIS record 9994.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic19-3-263.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic3433
Libraries: ACU

The limit of marine submergence of the last glaciation in the Cape Sparbo region varied in elevation from 65 m at Base Camp lowland, 73 m in Sparbo-Hardy lowland, to 82 m in the Skogn area; these variations are in part due to differences in time of deglaciation. Radiocarbon dates of marine shells indicate that the region was clear of ice by 15,500 yr BP; that the most rapid isostatic uplift occurred 9000-8000 yr BP and that the total rebound was about 110 m. The oldest dates, 15,000 and 13,000 BP, if correct, indicate the slow onset of isostatic uplift. (AB)

A, D
Deglaciation; Glaciation; Sea level

G0813
Skogn, Cape, region, Nunavut; Sparbo, Cape, region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Errors in short-term ablation measurements on melting ice surfaces   /   Muller, F.   Keeler, C.M.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 8, no. 52, 1969, p. 91-105, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 40959.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Rapid changes in time and space in the micro-relief of an ablating glacier surface and radiation-induced melt within the uppermost ice layer, termed the "weathering crust", seriously affect the accuracy of the short-term ablation measurements. The various measuring techniques commonly used (stakes, ablatometers, ablatographs) and some new methods (measurement of discharge from a small supraglacial drainage basin, and mass loss directly measured on core samples) are critically reviewed and assessed in the light of these phenomena. The implications for studies of heat and mass balance are discussed. It appears that the direct measurement of mass flux is the most accurate means of assessing short-term ablation rates. The errors in short-term ablation measurements by any method are largely compensatory and consequently do not influence long-period mass-balance estimates. (Au)

F
Ablation; Cores; Equipment and supplies; Glaciers; Heat transmission; Instruments; Mass balance; Measurement; Melting; Runoff; Surface properties

G0813
Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut; White Glacier, Nunavut


Growth and survival characteristics of three arctic bacteria on Truelove Lowland   /   Nelson, L.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 547-565, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16666.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

...It was felt that a more intensive study of several arctic bacterial isolates from soil under controlled conditions in the laboratory might provide valuable information for the estimation of potential activity levels in nature as well as some insight into bacterial adaptation to the arctic environment. The material presented in this chapter represents the preliminary results of laboratory studies performed on three bacterial isolates (Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., Arthrobacter sp.) from the Intensive Hummocky Sedge-moss Meadow Site. The effects of temperature, limiting nutrients, freeze-thawing, and starvation on growth and survival of these three isolates were assessed. Data on the effects of spring thaw on quantitative and qualitative changes in the soil microbial populations in the field are presented. (Au)

H
Bacteria; Soil microorganisms; Starvation

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Effect of spring thaw on microorganisms in an Arctic meadow site   /   Nelson, L.M.   Visser, S.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 10, no. 4, Nov. 1978, p. 679-688)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 36)
References.
ASTIS record 1429.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550736
Libraries: ACU

... The purpose of this present study was to assess the quantitative changes in bacterial, fungal, and algal populations of a hummocky sedge-moss meadow at Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada during the several weeks in which spring thaw occurred. Qualitative changes in bacterial populations before and after thaw were also determined, .... (Au)

H
Algae; Bacteria; Fungi

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Paleolimnology of Fish Lake, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. = Paléolimnologie du lac Fish, Truelove Lowland, île Devon, T.N.-O.   /   Ng, S.L.
In: Fourth National Student Conference on Northern Studies : Conference programme and abstracts, Government Conference Centre, Ottawa, November 26-27, 1994 = Quatrième conférence nationale des étudiants en études nordiques : Calendrier des événements et sommaires, Centre de Conférence du Gouvernement, Ottawa, du 26 au 27 novembre 1994. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1994, p. [89]
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 36681.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

Diatom and geochemical analyses of a sediment core from Fish Lake (75 33 N, 84 40 W) are used to reconstruct Holocene environmental changes. The lake originated 10,600 yr BP as a marine lagoon that was isolated by glacio-isostatic rebound 6,000 yr BP. Diatom zones in the core clearly document consecutive periods of marine formation, isolation and subsequent lacustrine conditions. Transfer functions derived from a Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) of present-day surface diatom assemblages and lake water chemistry are used to reconstruct the paleosalinity history of Fish Lake. Fossil diatom assemblages effectively identify the isolation contact and subsequent changes in paleosalinity. Multivariate statistical techniques identify chemical groupings in the core which document Holocene environmental change. During the early post-isolation phase, enhanced soil erosion and increased influx of nutrients into the lake stimulated the growth of lake biota, marked by an increase in biological silica and organic carbon in the sediments. During the mid-Holocene, stabilization of surface materials within the catchment is reflected by decreasing allochthonous components. Concurrently, a gradual increase in allochthonous Mn and Fe is attributed to progressive soil development. During the late-Holocene, a cooler, drier climate caused a decrease of lake productivity and sedimentation of allochthonous material. (Au)

B, I, H, F, J
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Cores; Diatoms; Geochemistry; Lakes; Palaeoecology; Recent epoch; Salinity

G0813
Fish Lake, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The association of free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria with the roots of High Arctic graminoids   /   Nosko, P.   Bliss, L.C.   Cook, F.D.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 26, no. 2, May 1994, p. 180-186, 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 59652.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1551782
Libraries: ACU

Samples of graminoid roots and adjacent soil collected from tundra and semidesert sites in the Canadian High Arctic were introduced to a nitrogen-free, nutrient medium formulated to culture N2-fixing microorganisms. Some enrichment cultures of root and soil material showed acetylene reduction activity, suggesting the presence of N2-fixing microorganisms. These microorganisms were found to be associated with the roots of 10 graminoid species (six grasses, two sedges, two rushes). Bacteria isolated from enrichment cultures included members of the genera Clostridium, Desulfovibrio, Klebsiella, and Azospirillum. Neither nitrogenase activity nor the presence of N2-fixing microorganisms was detected in soil or root enrichments of early-season (early July) samples; however, these were observed in enrichments of samples collected late in the growing season (late July to early August). The occurrence of Azospirillum species in arctic soils has not been previously reported, nor has the association of high arctic plants with free-living N2-fixing bacteria. The implications of rhizospheric interactions between N2-fixing bacteria and arctic plants which grow in nitrogen-deficient soils are discussed. (Au)

H, I, J, A, C, N
Adaptation (Biology); Bacteria; Biochemistry; Biological sampling; Biomass; Fungi; Grasses; Growing season; Heterotrophic bacteria; Juncaceae; Mosses; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Patterned ground; Plant cover; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Polar deserts; Primary production (Biology); Rhizobia; Roots; Sedges; Soil microorganisms; Soil temperature; Tundra ecology

G0813
Abernethy, Cape, Nunavut; Cameron Island, Nunavut; Resolute Bay region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The water relations of Carex stans in wet sedge-moss tundra at a High Arctic oasis, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Nosko, P.   Courtin, G.M.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 27, no. 2, May 1995, p. 137-145, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 59656.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1551895
Libraries: ACU

In the eastern Canadian High Arctic, wet sedge-moss tundras, dominated by Carex stans, are usually associated with "oases" where ameliorated physical conditions allow relatively high plant production. Although Carex stans occurs in water-saturated soils, low transpiration rates, stomatal conductances and leaf water potentials indicated that mild water stress was common in this species. Low transpiration rates under conditions of relatively high solar irradiance and air temperature resulted in leaf temperatures up to 10° C higher than that of the air. Trends in transpiration rate closely followed those in solar irradiance, air and leaf temperature and the leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference. Transpiration also exhibited significant positive correlations with soil temperature and wind speed. The maximum stomatal conductance in Carex stans (0.16 mol/m²/s) was considerably lower than maxima reported for polar semidesert graminoids; furthermore, the maximum rate in Carex was seldom achieved. Stomatal conductance showed strongest positive correlations with solar irradiance, leaf temperature, and leaf-to-air temperature and vapor pressure differences, and showed a strong negative correlation to soil temperature at -10 cm. Carex leaf water potentials ranged from -0.65 to -2.26 MPa, suggesting a water status more characteristic of polar semidesert graminoids than those of wet tundra. Leaf water potential was most highly correlated with air temperature and air vapor pressure deficit. Several anomalous relationships between stomatal conductance and other variables were observed. For example, stomatal conductance did not respond to changes in leaf water potential, was insensitive to changes in air vapor pressure deficit and was positively correlated with the leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference when a negative correlation was expected. Water stress in Carex stans is hypothesized to result from low soil temperatures and poor soil aeration, characteristics of sedge-mossmeadows which result from their waterlogged condition. Several studies have reported that productivity of wet graminoid tundra remains constant from year to year despite considerable annual variation in thermal inputs. We propose that in relatively warm summers, high arctic tundras dominated by Carex stans show no increased productivity due to greater instances of water stress and stomatal closure. (Au)

H, E, C, J
Atmospheric humidity; Climate change; Clouds; Diurnal variations; Effects of climate on plants; Effects of temperature on plants; Evaporation; Forecasting; Leaves; Meadows; Microclimatology; Mosses; Photosynthesis; Plant physiology; Plant respiration; Plant-water relationships; Precipitation (Meteorology); Primary production (Biology); Roots; Sedges; Soil moisture; Soil temperature; Solar radiation; Tundra ecology; Winds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The major organic components and caloric contents of High Arctic bryophytes   /   Pakarinen, P.   Vitt, D.H.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 52, no. 6, June 1974, p.1151-1161, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 14)
(Canadian Committee for the IBP contribution, no. 282)
References.
ASTIS record 38897.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b74-149
Libraries: ACU

Thirty-five bryophyte species representing the major habitats of a high arctic tundra lowland (Devon Island, Canada, 75 N) have been analyzed for contents of nitrogen, carbon, ash, and ether- and alcohol-soluble fractions. Mean contents (%) for the green portion of these species are total nitrogen, 1.00 (1.08 ash-free); total carbon, 45.9 (48.7 ash-free); ether-soluble fraction, 2.8 (3.0 ash-free); alcohol-soluble fraction, 11.8 (12.5 ash-free); and ash, 5.7. In the hydric species group, the total nitrogen content and the alcohol-soluble fraction are significantly greater than in mesic or xeric groups. When the green and brown segments are compared, the nitrogen content and the alcohol-soluble fraction are greater in the green portion, while the ash content is higher in the brown portion. The ash-free caloric values of hydric species range from 4.57 to 4.97 kcal/g, while the mesic and xeric species have a range from 4.50 to 4.69 kcal/g. The relations between habitats and between the green and brown portions are discussed in relation to general metabolic activity and productivity. (Au)

H, J
Biological productivity; Bryophytes; Carbohydrates; Carbon; Chlorophyll; Lipids; Meadows; Metabolism; Mosses; Nitrogen; Plant growth; Plant physiology; Plant-soil relationships; Proteins; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


1985 annual report of the Northern Heritage Society   /   Parker, P.   Strahlendorf, P.   Johnson, M.C.   Post, C.   Bertulli, M.   Kense, F.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Northern Heritage Society, 1985.
70 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 45766.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Since 1979, the Northern Heritage Society has grown and evolved, each year adding or modifying programmes as experience is gained. One of the strengths of the Society is its ability to adapt quickly to changing circumstances and to proceed rapidly from the "dreams and aspirations" stage to delivery of concrete services and programmes. As in previous years, 1985 witnessed a number of innovations and changes. The NHRP field school expanded its curriculum for the second year in a row, adding geography to the archaeology and ecology programmes. The geography programme, under the direction of Christine Post, is described in Chapter IV. A counselling program for the NHRP participants, initiated by Paul Parker, was also established during the field season (Chapter V). A brief description of a study on Inuit folk-ornithology, conducted by one of the archaeology instructors at the field school, Martha Johnson, is provided in Chapter VII. In previous years, the Society published the results of field school research activities in its annual report. This year the results are obtained from the research components of the archaeology, ecology and geography programmes to be published separately in an annual research report. A single report was becoming unwieldly. For the first time the annual report is illustrated with photographs. (Au)

R, U, J, A
Archaeology; Curricula; Ecology; Education; Geography; Northern Heritage Society; Research; Research stations; Traditional knowledge; Water quality

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Temperatures in the Devon Island ice cap, arctic Canada   /   Paterson, W.S.B.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 16, no. 74, 1976, p. 277)
ASTIS record 40970.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Temperatures have been measured in a 299 m bore hole that reaches the base of the ice near the divide of the main ice cap on Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Temperature ranges from -23.0° C at a depth of 20 m to -18.4° C at the bottom. The difference between surface and bottom temperatures is about 1.5° less than expected for a steady state. Recent climatic warming seems the most likely explanation of the discrepancy. The temperature gradient in the lowest 50 m is approximately linear and corresponds to a geothermal heat flux of 1.5 h.f.u. This value may be invalid, however, because temperatures at and below this depth have probably been perturbed by changes of surface temperature during the past several thousand years, particularly by the warming at the end of the last glaciation. A detailed analysis of the results is in progress. (Au)

F
Boreholes; Ice caps; Measurement; Temperature

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Vertical strain-rate measurements in an arctic ice cap and deductions from them   /   Paterson, W.S.B.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 16, no. 75, 1976, p. 3-12, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 40971.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Closely spaced measurements of diameter of thermally drilled bore holes reveal a pattern of small variations. These patterns serve to identify points on the bore-hole wall; thus the change in length of sections of bore hole can be determined as a function of time. This method has been used to measure vertical strain-rate as a function of depth in two bore holes near the crest of the Devon Island ice cap. The measured strain-rate, corrected for firn compaction, varies significantly with depth. The vertical component of velocity at the surface was determined from the contraction rate of a bore hole that penetrated to the base of the ice. Comparison of this velocity with the present accumulation rate suggests that the ice cap, in the vicinity of the bore hole, is thickening slightly at present. The age of the ice at various depths, as calculated from the measured vertical velocities, is in broad agreement with radio-carbon dates covering the past 6 000 years. This suggests that the flow of the ice cap has not varied significantly over this period, and thus that the present accumulation rate, which is causing thickening, is slightly above the average for the period. (Au)

F
Boreholes; Ice caps; Measurement; Strain; Temperature; Thickness; Velocity

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Thermal core drilling in ice caps in arctic Canada   /   Paterson, W.S.B.
In: Ice-core drilling / Edited by John F. Splettstoesser. - [S.l.] : University of Nebraska Press, 1976, p. 113-116
Reference.
ASTIS record 44350.
Languages: English

The CRREL shallow-hole thermal coring drill has been used to drill a 121-m borehole through the Meighen Ice Cap and three holes (230, 299 and 299 m) in the ice cap on Devon Island. Three of the four holes reached bedrock; in the 230-m hole, the drill became frozen and was lost. Operating conditions, the performance of the drill, and problems encountered are described. (Au)

F
Boreholes; Cold weather performance; Drilling; Equipment and supplies; Ice caps

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut


An oxygen-isotope climatic record from the Devon Island ice cap, arctic Canada   /   Paterson, W.S.B.   Koerner, R.M.   Fisher, D.   Johnsen, S.J.   Clausen, H.B.   Dansgaard, W.   Bucher, P.   Oeschger, H.
(Nature, v.266, no.5602, 7 Apr. 1977, p. 508-511, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 40898.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1038/266508a0
Libraries: ACU

Isotope measurements on two adjacent cores through the Devon Island ice cap provide a well-dated climatic record for the past 5000 yr. Fluctuations in annual values include much 'noise', and ice flow over a rough bed produces distortions in the lowest 5% of core which covers roughly 120,000 yr. Comparison with the Camp Century, Greenland, record helps to separate climatic changes from changes in ice thickness or flow pattern. (Au)

F, E, B
Accumulation; Climate change; Cores; Flow; Glacier variations; Ice caps; Isotopes; Measurement; Oxygen; Palaeoclimatology; Recent epoch; Snow; Strain

G0813, G10
Camp Century, Greenland; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Secondary and tertiary creep of glacier ice as measured by borehole closure rates   /   Paterson, W.S.B.
(Reviews of geophysics and space physics, v. 15, no. 1, Feb. 1977, p. 47-55, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 42683.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1029/RG015i001p00047

Published and previously unpublished measurements of closure rates of five boreholes in polar ice caps are reviewed. The data cover effective shear stresses between 0.15 and 1.0 MN/m², temperatures between -16 and -28 °C, and strains up to 2.2. Curves of strain at the borehole wall (logarithm of the ratio of hole diameter to its initial diameter) against time show a stage of constant closure rate corresponding to secondary (steady state) creep of the ice followed by accelerating closure rate attributed to recrystallization of the ice (tertiary creep). Curves for low stresses also show an initial transient stage of decreasing closure rate. The onset of tertiary creep is largely determined by the strain; critical values range from 0.03 to 0.10, and the lower the temperature, the higher the critical value. Secondary creep rates in the different boreholes are consistent with each other; the data yield a creep activation energy of 54 kJ/mol and a flow law index close to 3. The borehole data reduced to a common temperature of -22 °C are compared with the results of two laboratory experiments at this temperature. For a given stress the strain rates measured by Steinemann ... are 2-3 times those in the boreholes, and for the experiments of Barnes et al. (1971) the factor is about 8. Differences between laboratory and glacier ice, probably in grain size, may explain the differences between the borehole data and the results of Steinemann. Some evidence is presented that the creep rates measured by Barnes et al. at this temperature may contain a significant component of transient creep; this might account for the large difference between their results and those of Steinemann. The ratio of tertiary to secondary creep rate increases approximately linearly with the strain. No steady state tertiary creep rate is observed even at a strain of 1.5, at which point the ratio of tertiary to secondary creep rate is about 10. However, the ice is not strained uniformly during borehole closure. Even if recrystallization has been completed in the ice near the borehole wall, the ice further away, having been strained less, may still be recrystallizing. This may account for the failure to observe steady state tertiary creep. Near the bottom of one borehole, creep rates (tertiary) are about 4 times those in the ice immediately above. The boundary between the two deformation regions corresponds closely to the boundary between ice deposited during the Wisconsin glaciation and ice deposited since that time. The crystals in the Wisconsin ice are smaller, much less variable in size, and nearly equidimensional than those elsewhere. Moreover, the Wisconsin ice are smaller, much less variable in size, and more nearly equidimensional than those elsewhere. Moreover, the Wisconsin ice has a much higher microparticle content and a much lower content of salts of marine origin. It is suggested that one or more of these differences make the Wisconsin ice 'softer' than the remainder of the ice. The decrease in grain size is considered to be the most likely factor. (Au)

F
Boreholes; Creep; Flow; Glaciation; Glaciers; Ice caps; Mathematical models; Model ice; Physical properties; Salinity; Strain; Stress; Temperature

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Meighen Ice Cap, Nunavut


Comparison of theoretical and observed temperature profiles in Devon Island ice cap, Canada   /   Paterson, W.S.B.   Clarke, G.K.C.
(Geophysical journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, v. 55, 1978, p. 615-632, ill., 1 map)
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 43920.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1111/j.1365-246X.1978.tb05931.x
Libraries: ACU

A non-steady-state theoretical model is used to predict the present variation of temperature with depth in two boreholes in the Devon Island ice cap, Arctic Canada. The boreholes are 300 m apart and one of them reaches bedrock. The heat transfer equation is solved numerically with the record of past temperatures obtained from measurements of the variations of oxygen-isotope ratio with depth in the cores as surface boundary condition. The effects of ice advection, refreezing of meltwater percolating from the surface (the amount of which is recorded in the cores), heating due to firn compaction and ice deformation, and heat flow in the bedrock below the ice sheet are all included in the model. The free parameters are geothermal heat flux, present surface temperature and heat loss at the surface which depends on the depth of meltwater penetration and other factors. Agreement between observed and predicted temperature-depth profiles is very close. Latent heat released by percolating meltwater is the predominating factor in determining the temperature distribution in the upper half of each borehole. The temperature distribution is insensitive to the value of the factor used to convert oxygen-isotope ratio to temperature. (Au)

F
Boreholes; Deformation; Density; Glacial melt waters; Heat transmission; Ice caps; Isotopes; Mathematical models; Temperature; Velocity

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Past accumulation rates at Camp Century and Devon Island, deduced from ice-core measurements (abstract)   /   Paterson, W.S.B.   Waddington, E.D.
(Proceedings of the Symposium on Ice and Climate Modelling, held at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, U.S.A., 27 June - 1 July 1983 / Edited by S.H Schneider. Annals of glaciology, v. 5, 1984, p. 222-223)
Abstract only.
References.
ASTIS record 14532.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU NFSMO

Measurements of oxygen-isotope ratio in cores from polar ice sheets have provided detailed long-term records of past fluctuations in temperature. Cores in which annual layers can be identified also contain a record of past precipitation rates provided that one can calculate the total vertical strain to which each layer has been subjected since it was deposited at the surface. Because this is difficult, few such records have been published so far. [The state-of-the-art in the measurement of oxygen-isotope ratio in cores from polar ice sheets for the determination of long-term records of past fluctuations in temperature is discussed.] ... (Au)

F, A, B
Accumulation; Cores; Glacial epoch; Ice sheets; Palaeoclimatology; Snowfall

G10, G0813
Camp Century, Greenland; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Population levels and bioenergetics of arctic birds on Truelove Lowland   /   Pattie, D.L.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 413-436, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16660.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Information about populations of Canadian high arctic avifauna is largely limited to either intensive studies of one or two species over an extended period (Maher 1970a, Hussell 1972) or seasonal studies of discrete sites or assemblages of birds (Harrington n.d., Sutton and Parmelee 1956, Nicol 1961, Savile 1961, Nettleship 1967, Parmelee 1968). This study succeeded the 1966-69 studies of Hussell and Holroyd (1974) in the same area and was designed primarily to determine densities and population fluctuations of all bird species of a reasonably large area (43 km²) over four subsequent summer seasons. A secondary goal was the acquisition of bioenergetic and reproductive data from snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis). Population levels of all species breeding or summering on this high arctic tundra were needed as a basis for calculating energy flow through the ecosystem (Whitfield this volume). Bioenergetic studies of snow buntings similar to those West (1968) conducted on ptarmigan were carried out to make energy flow estimates more precise. Most of the study was restricted to Truelove Lowland. ... (Au)

I
Animal population; Birds; Energy budgets; Snow Buntings

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Musk ox density and calf numbers on Devon Island's north coast   /   Pattie, D.L.
(Journal of mammalogy, v. 67, no. 1, Feb. 1986, p. 190-191)
References.
ASTIS record 38922.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1381023
Libraries: ACU

Musk ox (Ovibos moschatus Zimmermann) populations of five adjacent lowlands on the north coast of Devon Island were surveyed by helicopter on July 31 and August 1, 1984. Visibility during the survey was excellent with prevailing conditions sunny. A grid pattern flown at an altitude of 30 to 40 m covered the lowlands at about 400 m intervals. ... [Agents of mortality, including bear kills, are cited.] (Au)

I
Aerial surveys; Animal mortality; Animal population; Animal reproduction; Helicopters; Muskoxen; Polar bears; Predation; Wolves

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


A 16-year record of summer birds on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Pattie, D.L.
(Arctic, v. 43, no. 3, Sept. 1990, p. 275-283, 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 30652.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic43-3-275.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1622
Libraries: ACU

An annual census of adult birds was conducted on the 43 km² Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada, in the summers of 1970-73 and 1978-89. Forty-three species were seen during 16 years. Of these, 18 species bred regularly on or immediately adjacent to the lowland and 10 were occasional breeders. In addition 15 species were visitors. The highest annual number for most breeding species was two to three times that of their lowest numbers, but some regular breeding species had far greater extremes. Extensions of the breeding range of Pacific Loon (Gavia pacifica), Purple Sandpiper (Calidris maritima), Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe), and Water Pipit (Anthus spinoletta) to Devon Island are reported. It is suspected that Hoary Redpolls (Carduelis hornemanni) and Red Knots (Calidris canutus) also nested there once each. A coefficient of detectability is presented for the 16 most frequently seen species. Synchronous fluctuations in Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) and Lapland Longspur (Calcarius lapponicus) populations were observed. A possible replacement of Black-bellied Plovers (Pluvialis squatarola) by Lesser Golden-Plovers (P. dominica) was detected. An abrupt disappearance of all colonies of breeding Arctic Terns (Sterna paradisaea) from the lowland was seen in 1989. (Au)

I
Animal distribution; Animal population; Animal reproduction; Bird nesting; Birds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Micromorphological and analytical characteristics of some soils from Devon and King Christian Islands, N.W.T.   /   Pawluk, S.   Brewer, R.
(Canadian journal of soil science, v. 55, Aug. 1975, p. 349-361, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 29)
References.
ASTIS record 41311.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.4141/cjss75-043
Libraries: ACU

Investigation of soils from Devon and King Christian Islands show frost processes as having a dominating influence upon microfabric characteristics. Frost processes are expressed in the various modifications of banded fabric observed in the soils, and fine-grained cappings on framework members. While soils from Devon Island show little evidence of chemical alteration, the soil from King Christian Island has chemical attributes which reflect desalinization and alkalization processes. Mineralogical weathering is minimal, but the soils can be differentiated on the basis of carbonate rock content and clay mineral distribution. Soils from Devon Island are classified as Regosolic Turbic Cryosols, while the soil from King Christian Island cannot be readily classified in the Canadian system of soil classification. (Au)

C
Chemical properties; Soil classification; Soils

G0813
King Christian Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Mapping muskox habitat in the Canadian High Arctic with SPOT satellite data   /   Pearce, C.M.
(Remote sensing of arctic environments. Arctic, v. 44, suppl. 1, 1991, p. 49-57, ill., maps)
References.
Presented at the International Circumpolar Symposium on Remote Sensing of Arctic Environments, 1st, Yellowknife, N.W.T., 1-3 May 1990
ASTIS record 31327.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic44-S-49.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic1570
Libraries: ACU

SPOT satellite data were used to detect and map muskox habitat on Devon Island, N.W.T. Muskox habitat in the Canadian High Arctic is restricted to small islands of productive sedge meadow isolated within a matrix of sparsely vegetated polar desert. On Devon Island, muskox herds move among small lowlands on the northeast coast adjacent to Jones Sound in response to the seasonal availability of sedge-dominated habitat. Comparisons between the enhanced satellite images and species composition, plant cover, and standing crop on these lowlands showed that sedge meadows were spectrally distinct from the dwarf shrub/heath and cushion plant/lichen-moss types on beach ridges and rock outcrops, indicating that spectral data can be used to identify critical forage habitat for muskoxen in the High Arctic. The hummocky sedge/moss meadow and the less productive frost boil sedge/moss meadow types could be separated from each other on the enhanced imagery. The satellite data were simplified using a supervised classification to document the type and areal cover of muskox habitat along the northeast coast of Devon Island. The spatially isolated hummocky sedge/moss and frost boil sedge/moss meadows occupied only 3% (16.73 km²) and 6% (32.84 km²) respectively of a total land area of 549.38 km². (Au)

I, H, J
Animal distribution; Animal food; Mapping; Muskoxen; Plant cover; Plant distribution; Polar deserts; Remote sensing; Satellite photography; Sedges; Wildlife habitat

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Origin and significance of wet spots on scraped surfaces in the High Arctic   /   Price, L.W.   Bliss, L.C.   Svoboda, J.
(Arctic, v. 27, no. 4, Dec. 1974, p. 304-306, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 26)
References.
ASTIS record 10285.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic27-4-304.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2887
Libraries: ACU

In the western Queen Elizabeth Islands, Northwest Territories, where most of the petroleum exploration in the High Arctic is being conducted, much of the low lying land is covered with sorted and non-sorted circles and polygons 0.5-2.0 m in diameter. ... Much of the oil-camp construction takes place on the coastal low-lands on polygonal surfaces composed of sandy to silty loams. When these surfaces are scraped and reworked for camp areas and air strips in summer, it is common for them to have numerous wet spots which become soft and spongy and of jelly-like consistency when equipment is moved across them .... a small study was conducted in 1972 at the Sunoco Camp no. 3002 on the northeast side of King Christian Island (77° 44'N, 101° 15'W), approximately 3.5 km from the sea. There the surface soils consist of fine marine sediments intermixed with small pebbles. The entire camp area and the Hercules landing strip are built on a surface covered with non-sorted polygons. ... Excavations were made on both the disturbed surface, where the damp spots occurred, as well as in the undisturbed area adjacent to the camp. ... From the information obtained during the excavations in each of the areas described, it is possible to understand more clearly the mechanisms responsible for the features. The wet spots in the cleared work-area are located at the foci of ground-ice accumulations which occur at the margins and intersections of the non-sorted patterned ground. The occurrence of ground-ice at the perimeters of the non-sorted polygons is explained by the contraction cracks which form and outline the patterned ground. Moisture from the scanty precipitation (especially blowing snow) accumulates in the cracks and eventually becomes incorporated in the underlying frozen ground as ice veins. Since the cracks are areas of greater moisture (as well as microhabitats), the plants tend to congregate in them and in turn reinforce the moisture content by (1) their greater moisture-holding capacity, (2) more efficient moisture entrapment, and (3) retarding the rate of thaw owing to the slightly greater insulation they provide. Once such a surface is disturbed, as it was in this case by light blading with a bulldozer, the vegetation is destroyed (at least the above- surface parts). Greater thawing may then occur, during which the moisture is drawn to the surface by capillary action as melting of the ground ice takes place. These bladed areas increase soil compaction and therefore thermal conductivity, and so melt is accelerated. In addition, the organic matter and remaining live plant material in the crack act as a "wick" drawing the moisture to the surface. A last but very important factor is the movement of heavy equipment over the surface. ... Their main area of concentration was in the work area in front of the camp where there was continual movement of equipment. The repetitive application of pressure over an area rich in ground ice ... has a "pumping" action whereby moisture is slowly forced to the surface. This constant agitation distributes the water throughout the mass, and the material becomes "quick" owing to the reduction of intergranular pore pressure. This results in loss of cohesion, and the material becomes spongy and jelly-like when pressure is applied. The practical significance of this brief investigation is that the wet spots will probably not increase in size or the surface deteriorate further, but in fact there should be an improvement. It appeared from discussion with camp managers on two islands that, after two or three summers of use of the surface and scraping, the wet spots dry out. The best approach to the use of these vegetated (and therefore ice-rich) non-sorted, patterned ground surfaces in the High Arctic is to clear the areas before thawing occurs in the spring, and if possible not to use them heavily during the first one or two summers. By the second or third summer much of the ground ice will have thawed, so there should be less chance of major problems with wet and soft spots - unless the summer is unusually wet, as it was 1973. (Au)

C

G0813


Nematode densities and production on Truelove Lowland   /   Procter, D.L.C.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 347-361, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16648.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The role of free-living soil nematodes in energy flow through high arctic ecosystems is poorly known. This paper is part of a study of the role of nematodes in energy flow in the Truelove Lowland terrestrial ecosystem. The primary purposes of this research were to measure the energy passing through the nematodes, and to determine the relative importance of nematodes in total invertebrate energy flow. Ryan (this volume) has estimated energy flow for the other important invertebrates in this ecosystem. This paper gives nematode densities for July and August 1972, and for June to September 1973, and presents estimates of standing crop, respiration, turnover time, and production for the 1972 and 1973 growing seasons. Data are given for several habitats in the ecosystem. The dominant genera are also listed, and their trophic relations indicated. Apart from the density estimates, this information is preliminary and more refined estimates are being prepared. (Au)

I
Animal population; Animal respiration; Energy budgets; Nematoda; Trophic levels

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Invertebrate respiration on Truelove Lowland   /   Procter, D.L.C.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 383-393, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16659.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This paper presents metabolic rates for representatives of most of the important terrestrial and aquatic invertebrate groups found on Truelove Lowland. Species of Enchytraeidae, Crustacea, Acarina, Collembola, Lepidoptera, Muscidae, and Chironomidae were studied. Field research was carried out during July and August 1972, and from June to September 1973. ... (Au)

I
Animal physiology; Animal respiration; Invertebrates; Metabolism

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Studies on the lichens of Truelove Lowland   /   Richardson, D.H.S.   Finegan, E.J.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 245-262, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16642.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... Many reports concerning the growth and production of arctic lichens deal with Cladonia species which form mats over the ground in low arctic and sub-arctic habitats. Such work has been done by Salazkin (1937), Andreev (1954), Scotter (1963), Igumnova and Shamurin (1965), Barashkova (1967), Karenlampi (1971), and Kershaw and Rouse (1971 a and b). Very little work has been reported on lichens from high arctic locations, where Alectoria and Cetraria species with a variety of crustose species form an important component of the ground flora. The objectives of the study were to obtain data on the species composition, standing crop and, if possible, production of the lichens of this high arctic ecosystem. (Au)

H
Lichens

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Harvesting and utilization of pinnipeds by Inuit hunters in Canada's eastern high Arctic   /   Riewe, R.   Amsden, C.W.
(Thule Eskimo culture : an anthropological retrospective / Edited by Allen P. McCartney. Paper - Archaeological Survey of Canada, no. 88, 1979, p. 324-348, ill., figures, maps, tables)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 37)
Bibliography: p.347-348.
ASTIS record 3679.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The modern-day pinniped harvesting methods employed by the Grise Fiord Inuit are described and contrasted in terms of their efficiencies and economics. ... Between 1956 and 1972, the community's adult hunters, averaging 15 per year, harvested a mean catch of 703 pinnipeds annually. Approximately 85% of this annual harvest was composed of ringed seals. These animals are taken throughout the annual cycle with diverse techniques including open water hunting, allu hunting, stalking, nunajak hunting, shoreline hunting, and netting. The various abilities and efficiencies of the hunters are examined. (Au)

T, N
Inuit; Sealing; Subsistence; Traditional knowledge

G0813
Grise Fiord (Settlement), Nunavut; Grise Fiord, Nunavut; Jones Sound, Nunavut


The High Arctic wolf in the Jones Sound region of the Canadian High Arctic   /   Riewe, R.R.
(Arctic, v. 28, no. 3, Sept. 1975, p. 209-212, ill., 1 map)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 30)
References.
ASTIS record 10308.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic28-3-209.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2835
Libraries: ACU

The high arctic wolf Canis lupus arctos, a white, medium-sized subspecies of the arctic wolf, and a considerable carnivore, ranges over the Queen Elizabeth Islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. ... With the object of adding to the meagre literature on the high arctic wolf, I present in this paper the results of observations I made on it over a total period of 425 days spent in the field in the Jones Sound region, collecting information on the local wildlife and Inuit. ... Little is actually known about the wolf's predatory behaviour in the eastern High Arctic, and much of what is attributed to the high arctic wolf is merely hearsay or speculation. For example, in the Jones Sound region muskox carcasses which bear signs of attention from wolves are usually referred to as wolf-kills. It is possible that some of these carcasses have simply been scavenged by wolves. ... Over the years, some of the residents of Grise Fiord have attributed the decline of Peary's caribou Rangifer tarandus pearyi in the region to the predatory habits of wolves, in spite of the absence of any proof that they have a controlling effect upon the size of caribou populations. It appears in actual fact that man has been blaming his competitor, the wolf, for the problems he himself has created. ... From data based on reports of members of the Grise Fiord Detachment of the R.C.M.P. I have been able to derive the following average numbers of wolves taken: 1956-57 to 1962-63: 1.7; 1963-64 to 1967-68: 4.4; 1968-69 to 1970-71: 9.6. The sharp increase from 1.7 to 4.4 was a result of the reintroduction in 1964 of bounty payments in the Northwest Territories for the capture of wolves. A hunter receives $40 for each animal captured, as well as the pelt which has a value ranging between $10 and $150. Some pelts are used locally for the trimming of parkas, for which they are however considered inferior to the pelts of dogs or imported wolverine. Most wolves taken up to 1968 were either poisoned, accidentally caught in fox traps, or shot as they approached hunters or their dogs out of curiosity. Since the coming into general use of snowmobiles in the area, however, hunters have usually followed any fresh wolf track in the hope of catching up with one of the animals. The fact that the average number caught over the three years ending in 1971 was as high as 9.6 per year was therefore the result of overhunting by snowmobile, and not of an increase in numbers of the animals. The overhunting which took place over the years 1968-71 is the presumable explanation of the fact that not one wolf was taken during the years 1971-72. ... Wolf carcasses are not eaten either by Inuit or their dogs. (Au)

I

G0813
Baumann Fiord region, Nunavut; Devon Island, Nunavut; Grise Fiord region, Nunavut; Jones Sound region, Nunavut


Mammalian carnivores utilizing Truelove Lowland   /   Riewe, R.R.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 493-501, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16663.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Mammalian carnivores utilizing Truelove Lowland include short-tailed weasel (Mustela erminea), arctic fox (Alopex lagopus), arctic wolf (Canis lupus), and polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Due to the infrequent use of the Lowland by wolves and bears, negligible data were collected on these carnivores in relation to it. ... This section deals only with arctic foxes and short-tailed weasels. (Au)

I
Animal ecology; Arctic foxes; Weasels

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Jones Sound region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The utilization of wildlife in the Jones Sound region by the Grise Fiord Inuit   /   Riewe, R.R.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 623-644
References.
ASTIS record 16672.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... Most anthropological studies dealing with the Inuit and their subsistence strategies have been qualitative and/or theoretical in nature. However, there has been a trend developing among a few northern researchers to quantify the Inuit's dependence upon the land, some of the most-noteworthy examples being Foote and Williamson (1966), Foote (1967), Freeman (1969-70), Kemp (1971), and Usher (1971, 1976). In following this trend, the objectives of this study were to quantify the dependence of Grise Fiord Inuit upon the land and their utilization of wildlife and to examine their role in arctic ecosystems, both terrestrial and aquatic. (Au)

T, N, I
Inuit; Land use; Subsistence; Wildlife management

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The chemical and physical limnology of Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Robilliard, L.J.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1991.
72 p.
Thesis (B.A.) - Dept. of Geography, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1991.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32283.
Languages: English

Lake, pond and inlet water at Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. was sampled to provide a limnologic description of this particular High Arctic setting. The objective was to group the lakes on the basis of various chemical and physical properties. A data set containing measurements of temperature, depth, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen, CO2, alkalinity, hardness, redox potential, SiO22-, C1-, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+ for 121 lake samples and one inlet sample was analyzed. Multivariate statistical techniques including cluster analysis and discriminant function analysis successfully isolate four lake groupings based on the chemical and physical properties of Truelove lakes and ponds. The development of these groups was due primarily to the discriminating power of chloride concentrations, conductivity and redox potential. The chemistry of a distinct marine lagoon group varied considerably from those of three other groups controlled by lake size and depth, distance from the calcareous rock escarpment and underlying bedrock geology. The interesting spatial arrangement of these lakes and tundra ponds was determined to be the result of such local influences. However, these factors are working against the flushing effect of ice melt each spring and generally, Truelove lakes are similar to other High Arctic lakes in their dilute, oligotrophic chemistries. (Au)

F, I, B
Chemical properties; Electrical properties; Electronic data processing; Fresh-water biology; Lake ice; Melting; Oligotrophic lakes; Physical properties; Stratigraphy; Theses; Tundra ponds; Water pH

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The climatic record from ice cores : isotopic-temperature (delta-theta) noise   /   Robin, G. de Q.
In: The climatic record in polar ice sheets / Edited by G. de Q. Robin. - Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1983, p. 184-189, ill.
Paper presented at a workshop held at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, 1-14 January and 12-24 March, 1973.
References.
ASTIS record 11927.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... A study of 844 annual delta values in the top part of two ice cores from Devon Island gives a value of chi squared well within that of a normal distribution, although this analysis covers both delta-theta noise and the delta signal related to temperature. At Dome C in Antarctica, Benoist et al. (1982) found that the distribution of delta values down to 105 m approximated to a Gaussian distribution. In this case the variance of delta values is dominated almost completely by the delta noise component of delta-theta noise. However, so many factors govern the delta-theta noise level that the assumption of random distribution is at best an empirical approximation. These factors are now discussed in more detail to show the complexity of the problem. ... (Au)

F, E
Climatology; Cores; Effects of climate on ice; Ice caps; Ice sheets; Isotopes

G15, G10, G0813
Antarctic regions; Camp Century, Greenland; Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut


Scientific depth study of arctic oasis   /   Royle, J.C.
(Canadian geographical journal, v. 89, no. 5, Nov. 1974, p. 4-11, ill. (some col.), 1 map)
ASTIS record 42866.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The author discusses the development of the Devon Island Research Station of the Arctic Institute of North America and the contributions made by those visiting scientists to the wealth of information that has resulted from their studies about the Truelove Lowland. Officers of the Arctic Institute of North America gave the name "Truelove" to the lowland and also to the river and inlet nearby when they established a research base there in 1960. For several hundred scientists and scientific workers who have camped in the orange huts on the tundra and have scrutinized in minute detail every aspect of its life, the name "Truelove Lowland" stuck. The lowland is one of the few pockets of comparatively lush vegetation in the Canadian High Arctic. This has been an important centre for studies in a broad range of fields including plant and animal life, meteorology, geology, environmental hazards, permafrost, etc. (ASTIS)

X, J, I, H, A, F, N, T
Arctic Institute of North America; Biology; Botany; Economic conditions; Geographical names; Geography; Glaciology; Hunting; Inuit; Plant growth; Research funding; Research personnel; Research stations; Social conditions; Tundra ecology; Zoology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Synthesis of energy flows and population dynamics of Truelove Lowland invertebrates   /   Ryan, J.K.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 325-346, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16647.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... While energy flow through invertebrates may never be accurately measured, the Arctic is the best climatic zone where approximations of it can be made. The main obstacle to assessing invertebrate energy flow is the tremendous diversity of species and habits [sic]. The population size and structure must be determined for each species, for a year, to construct a summary annual energy budget. In an arctic ecosystem the invertebrate, and total organismic, species diversities are reduced (Downes 1964, MacLean 1975, cf. Appendices). Primary production, the limiting variable for secondary production, is drastically less than that in other ecosystems (Odum 1971). Seasons are short and decisively limited by below 0 C temperature. This communication investigates which invertebrate taxa are dominant and what trophic levels are most significant in this ecosystem, and estimates the combined invertebrate annual energy flow. The arctic location, data from other energy flow studies, and the integrated research effort, make the Truelove site ideal for this undertaking. Data are presented in two parts. The first section "collected data," contains experimentally determined values and direct observations on invertebrate populations. The second section contains energy flow values determined through a computer model. These data are termed "hypothetical" as they are not measured quantities. (Au)

I
Energy budgets; Invertebrates; Trophic levels

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Water availability to some arctic ecosystems   /   Ryden, B.E.
(Nordic hydrology, v. 7, 1976, p. 73-80, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 41316.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Water in permafrost areas is available to the organisms during a short time and in a restricted space. Models of soil water occurrence and flow are applicated as basis for analysis of moisture in the environment of organisms. Soil moisture, available for the transpiration process, has been calculated as to soil in permafrost. The seasonal variation of soil moisture is shown. (Au)

C, J, H
Capillary action; Evaporation; Flow; Groundwater; Moisture content of permafrost; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Roots; Soil moisture; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Hydrology of Truelove Lowland   /   Ryden, B.E.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 107-136, ill., map
References.
ASTIS record 16632.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the water budget of the Intensive Study Sites and the Truelove Lowland; (2) the hydrological regime of rivers and streams connected to the Lowland, in particular the dynamics of their discharge during snowmelt, and (3) the pattern of evaporation from meadows and lakes. (Au)

F
Evaporation; Hydrology; River discharges

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The chemical evolution of three High Arctic coastal lakes, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Scheibli, F.J.
Poster session.
Paper presented at the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, 2nd, Ottawa, Ont., 23-24 Nov., 1988.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 29146.
Languages: English

A physical and chemical analysis of three Arctic lakes was conducted during the summer of 1988 at the Truelove Lowland Research station on Devon Island, N.W.T. (75 40 N, 84 35 W). The data was gathered from randomly selected holes drilled through the ice surface from the three largest lakes on the Lowland. At each site, a vertical profile of water samples and some in situ data was collected. These samples were analyzed for pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and the chloride ion content. The water samples are currently being analyzed in the laboratory for a range of chemical elemental concentrations. The objective of this research is to identify an evolutionary sequence for lake maturation on the Lowland. Since the study site has been continually rebounding since 9,700 years B.P. and is documented relatively well, it serves as an ideal site for analysis. Bodies of water have been sequentially isolated by offshore bars. Following isolation from the sea, the lake catchments are subjected to terrestrial weathering regimes. Facilitated by fresh water inputs derived from ice and snow melt, allochthonous material including detrital organic and inorganic material is introduced into the lake environment. (Au)

F
Chemical properties; Composition; Electrical properties; Lakes; Oxygen; Physical properties

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Some flowering plants of the Devon Island lowlands   /   Schulten, R.B.
(Arctic, v. 28, no. 2, June 1975, p. 92-98, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 10295.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic28-2-92.pdf
Web: doi:10.14430/arctic2820
Libraries: ACU

When the massive ice sheet of the last Pleistocene glacier melted 10,000 years ago, land which had been forced below sea level under its weight began to rise, and the receding water left behind rows of beach ridges and shallow depressions. On the northern shore of Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic, there is an area of such lowland about 40 square kilometres in extent. It is bounded in the north and west by Jones Sound and in the south by the Truelove Inlet and River, while to its east lies an escarpment 1000 ft (300 m) high separating it from the upland plateau of the interior of the Island and the remains of its ice cap. From the base of the escarpment to the sea, this lowland area is a treeless terrain of lakes and ponds separated by grassy meadows and rocky beach ridges, dissected by meandering melt streams. During the summer, many of the meadows are wet and muddy, retaining a good deal of standing water during the short growing season. The raised beach ridges are dry and pebbly along their tops, becoming progressively moister as they slope down towards the meadows and ponds. The flowers described and illustrated in this article are all to be found growing in this lowland area. ... (Au)

H, F, A, J

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The evolution of lacustrine deposits and associated landforms, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Smith, I.R.   Somr, C.
Poster session.
Paper presented at the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, 2nd, Ottawa, Ont., 23-24 Nov., 1988.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 29147.
Languages: English

Glacioisostatic uplift of the Truelove Lowland over the last 10,500 years has resulted in the progressive emergence of this coastal lowland and the sequential isolation of a number of lake basins from the marine environment. Inorganic and organic sediments have subsequently accumulated within these lake basins. Using the present lake ice as a coring platform, unfrozen sediment cores have been obtained of the lake sediments using a modified Livingstone piston corer. During the 1988 summer field season a total of 18 sediment cores, ranging in length from 22 cm to 1.46 m, were obtained from four of the larger lakes in the Lowland. The cores consisted primarily of a black to reddish brown gyttja resulting from the autochthonous algae production within the lake. (Au)

B
Bottom sediments; Coring; Lakes

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Paleolimnology of a High Arctic emergent lake, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island   /   Smith, I.R.
Paper presented at the Canadian Association of Geographers Conference, Edmonton, Alberta, June 2, 1990.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 31110.
Languages: English

Lake sediments are being used to reconstruct aspects of the paleoenvironmental record preserved over the last 10,000 years. Research is being conducted on a small (0.35 km 2), 10 m deep, oligotrophic lake at Truelove Lowland (75 33 N, 84 40 W). The Lowland represents an emergent lowland arising from the isostatic and eustatic post-glacial fluctuations. As such, lake sediments should record a transition from a marine, through a brackish lagoonal phase, to a final freshwater environment. Diatoms, microscopic algae which display a marked habitat affinity and possessing an exoskeleton of silica, have been used to identify this transition at an approximate depth of 70 cm. Though the marine/brackish transition appears relatively sharp, the brackish/freshwater transition does not. Sediment reworking may be responsible, however, it is also possible that a saline dense layer at the base of the lake persisted for some time before freshening was complete. For this reason, sediment chemistry is also being investigated for evidence of chemical precipitation as a result of anoxic lake water conditions. (Au)

A, B
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Composition; Coring; Diatoms; Formation; Lagoons; Oligotrophic lakes; Palaeogeography; Sea level; Sedimentation; Stratigraphy; Tundra ponds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


An investigation of the chemical paleoenvironmental record preserved in the sediments of a shallow, High Arctic emergent lake, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Smith, I.R.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1991.
235 p.
Thesis (M.Sc.) - Dept. of Geography, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1991.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32284.
Languages: English

The paleolimnological record of three parallel sediment cores removed from Middle Beschel Lake, a small (0.34 km²), shallow (10.2m maximum depth), oligotrophic lake on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, isolated as a result of glacio-isostatic uplift, is examined. Chemical, biological and physical sedimentological characteristics of the sediments were examined using a variety of techniques. Results of these analyses were used to determine the nature and controls of the preserved sedimentary paleoenvironmental record. Within the diatom study a sharp decrease in marine Cocconeis spp. and a dramatic rise in Fragilaria spp. is used to identify the isolation of the lake basin from the sea occurring at 70cm depth in core MB3. A 14C date of 12,250 yr B.P.(TO-1834) taken from a bulk sediment sample at 71cm depth is considerably older than the predicted emergence date of 7500 yr B.P. This may be attributable to reworking of older marine sedimentary material, or the result of contamination by old mineral carbon. Chemical fractionation and bulk sample analyses were used to differentiate between sediments derived from the catchment (allochthonous materials), and those from processes operating in the lake and sediments themselves (autochthonous materials). Results from the sedimentary pigments, extractable silica and organic matter determinations indicate that the preserved biological record is chiefly the result of actual autochthonous production, rather than from the inwash of allochthonous organic detritus. There is evidence to suggest that autochthonous biological production increased under climatically warmer conditions likely to have occurred around 5000 yr B.P. The increased anaerobic decomposition of buried organic materials is considered to be the cause of increased autochthonous Fe concentrations between 34-20cm. Released sulphur compounds would tend to immobilize Fe within the sediments. Periods of increased erosion were identified using a Cluster Analysis. Uranium and As and, to a lesser degree Cr and allochthonous Mg, were found to be the most significant discriminators of the erosion deposits. Results indicate that, with the exception of allochthonous Mg, increased concentrations of the three trace elements which distinguish these deposits as erosion deposits are likely a reflection of reduced weathering and leaching of the allochthonous clastic materials. It is concluded that in shallow High Arctic lakes with low sedimentation rates, such as Middle Beschel Lake, the preserved sedimentary record is predominantly controlled by changes in the physical lake environment, notably conditions and extent of ice cover. (Au)

B, F, A, E, J
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Climate change; Composition; Cores; Erosion; Ice cover; Lake ice; Oligotrophic lakes; Palaeoecology; Palaeogeography; Palaeontology; Physical geography; Physical properties; Primary production (Biology); Sedimentation; Theses; Trace elements

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The nature of the chemical paleoenvironmental record preserved in the sediments of a shallow, High Arctic emergent lake, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. = La nature de la colonne paléoenvironnementale chimique conservée dans les sédiments d'un lac peu profond en voie d'émersion, sur les basses terres de Truelove, dans l'île Devon (T.N.-O.)   /   Smith, I.R.   King, R.H.
In: Third National Student Conference on Northern Studies : abstracts of papers / Sponsored by Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs and Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1991, p. 197-198
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 32285.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

Three sediment cores were removed from Middle Beschel Lake, a small (0.34 km²), shallow (10.2m), oligotrophic lake in the Truelove Lowland (75 33 N; 84 40 W), to determine the nature of the preserved chemical paleoenvironmental record. Estimates from a local emergence curve indicate the lake was isolated from the sea c. 7500 yr B.P. Diatom assemblages identify this transition at 70cm depth in the sediment cores. Chemical fractionation techniques were used to differentiate between the sediments derived from the catchment and those from processes operating in the lake and sediments themselves. The non-clastic chemical record included adsorbed and organic-, sulphate- and carbonate-complexed ions. Results indicate that the primary controls of the preserved chemical record are the lake and sedimentary environments, but chemical signals of changes in the catchment are also present. For example, the stratigraphies of the redox sensitive elements, Fe and Mn, record changes between periods when the ice pan melted completely each summer, allowing complete mixing of the lake, to a prolonged period in which the ice pan never completely melted, allowing the development of a benthic anoxic layer. The inorganic clastic sediments are predominantly derived from an adjacent sedimentary escarpment. Chemical analyses indicate relatively constant compositions below 18cm depth. Above this, coincident with a sudden rise in clay content from 10 to 40%, there is a rise in K, and a dramatic stepwise decline in A1, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn. There is no distinct change in the mineralogy of the sands and coarse silts. Observed changes are thus attributed to the mineralogic composition of the clay fraction. It appears that conditions in the lake relating to the presence or absence of a continuous ice cover are controlling the redistribution of sediment inputs into the lake. Under generally open water conditions the sediment inputs are being more homogeneously mixed with the lake waters and are deposited across the lake basin. However, under the presence of a continuous ice pan, the coarser materials are being deposited upon entry in the littoral regions, while the finer materials are being held in suspension, and settling out in the deeper parts of the lake. (Au)

B, F, A, G
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Composition; Cores; Ice cover; Lake ice; Lakes; Palaeogeography; Physical geography; Physical properties; Sedimentation; Soil erosion; Stratigraphy

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The nature of the chemical paleoenvironmental record preserved in sediments of a shallow, High Arctic emergent lake, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, NWT [Le caractère de la colonne paléoenvironnementale conservée dans les sédiments dans un lac peu profond qui a émergé de la mer dans le Haut-Arctique, basses-terres de Truelove, île Devon, T.N.-O.]   /   Smith, I.R.   King, R.H.
(Student research in Canada's North : proceedings of the Third National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, October 23-24, 1991 / Edited by W.O. Kupsch and J.F. Basinger. Musk-ox, no. 39, special publication, 1992, p. 210)
Abstract only.
ASTIS record 34137.
Languages: English and French
Libraries: ACU

Three sediment cores were removed from Middle Beschel Lake, a small (0.34 km²), shallow (10.2 m), oligotrophic lake in the Truelove Lowland (75 33 N, 84 40 W), to determine the nature of the preserved chemical paleoenvironmental record. Estimates from a local emergence curve indicate the lake was isolated from the sea c.a. 7500 yrs B.P. Diatom assemblages identify this transition at 70 cm depth in the sediment cores. Chemical fractionation techniques were used to differentiate between sediments derived from the catchment and those from processes operating in the lake and its sediments. The non-clastic chemical record included absorbed ions of organic-, sulphate-, and carbonate-complexes. Results indicate that the primary controls of the preserved chemical record are the lake and sedimentary environments. However, there are chemical signals of changes between periods when the ice pan melted completely each summer - allowing complete mixing of the lake - to a prolonged period in which the ice pan never completely melted. These changes allowed development of a benthic, anoxic layer. The inorganic clastic sediments are predominantly derived from an adjacent sedimentary escarpment. Chemical analyses indicate relatively constant compositions below 18 cm depth. Above this, coincident with a sudden rise in clay content from 10 to 40 per cent, there is a rise in K and a dramatic stepwise decline in Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn. There is no distinct change in the mineralogy of the sands and coarse silts. Observed changes are thus attributed to the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction. (Au)

B, A
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Coring; Diatoms; Lakes; Minerals; Oligotrophic lakes; Palaeogeography; Sea level

G0813
Beschel Lakes, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic hares on Truelove Lowland   /   Smith, R.F.C.   Wang, L.C.H.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 461-466
References.
ASTIS record 16662.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Arctic hares (Lepus arcticus) are confined to the tundra zone of North America (Hall and Kelson 1959). The most northerly subspecies (L. a. monstrabilis) occurs throughout the Queen Elizabeth Islands with the exception of Prince Patrick Island. No scientific studies have been made of population levels of arctic hares in the Canadian arctic. Population sizes are variable spatially and temporally (Cahalane 1961) and anecdotal reports suggest that parts of Ellesmere Island and part of Axel Heiberg Island support relatively high populations in some years while hares are generally rare elsewhere. This study measured the energy metabolism of L. a. monstrabilis under various thermal environments both by conventional feeding experiments and by continuous recording of oxygen consumption in the laboratory. Based on the information obtained, the impact of this species on the production and energy flow on Truelove Lowland is evaluated. (Au)

I
Animal physiology; Animal population; Energy budgets; Hares; Metabolism

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The nature and genesis of brunisolic turbic cryosols on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Somr, C.H.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1988.
1 v.
Thesis (B.Sc. Honours) - University of Western Ontario, Dept. of Geography, London, Ont., 1988.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 29148.
Languages: English

The maximum expression of soil development on Truelove Lowland is represented by the presence of Brunisolic Turbic Cryosols on the foreslopes of the raised beaches found on the lowland. Sampling of the soils on the foreslope of a selected raised beach on the north coast of the lowland was carried out using a grid sampling method which enabled a toposequence of soils to be collected and their chemical and physical characteristics examined in order to identify the model concept for this soil development. The site selected is moderately drained and is located amid igneous and metamorphic outcrops. This enables the full development of the soil without the subduing effects of carbonates or reducing conditions due to abundant moisture to affect the system. Direct relationships were found to occur between the organic matter content and the nitrogen, carbonate, pH, TOC, TEB, and pyrophosphate extractable Fe+Al contents in the soil. No lateral trends along the slope were seen in the data, however, carbonate content did decrease downslope due to the leaching effect of water through the soil. The range of values representing the modal concept for these soils was identified; however, due to the small scale of this study, the values could not be expanded to document the occurrence of these soils on a more regional scale. (Au)

C
Beaches; Composition; Formation; Leaching; Soil chemistry; Soils; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Polygenetic ice-cored mound complexes, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Somr, C.H.
Paper presented at the Canadian Association of Geographers Conference, Edmonton, Alta., 1990.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 31111.
Languages: English

A number of ice-cored mound complexes can be found on Truelove Lowland which is located on the northeastern coast of Devon Island. Their physical and chemical characteristics can be used in the interpretation of their genesis. ... [comprising] numerous raised polygonal mounds, these complexes range in size from 300 m2 to 0.5 km2. The individual mounds that make up the complexes are between 1.5m and 8m in diameter and up to 1m in height with relatively flat tops. The mounds are composed of grey sand-sized inorganic sediments overlain by ice-rich algal gyttja and/or peat. The peat is dominated by macroscopic fragments of mosses and vascular plants such as Dryas integrifolia and Salix arctica. Horizontal lenses of both segregated and intrusive forms of ground ice within these sediments has created the raised nature of theses features. The ice ranges from 1-2 cm lenses of relatively clear ice to very vesicular lenses up to 1.5 m thick. Elongated bubbles and vertical bubble trains within most of the ice lenses indicate that rapid freezing has taken place due to the aggradation of permafrost into the saturated lacustrine sediments. The infilling of desiccation and thermal contraction cracks by atmospheric water has produced vertically foliated ice wedges up to 2.4m in depth that form polygonal fissures in these sediments. Block erosion of the sediments along the edges of the mounds has resulted in the degraded appearance of the complexes. (Au)

A, C
Erosion; Frost mounds; Ground ice; Ice wedges; Peat

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Origin of polygonal peat plateaus under conditions of continuous permafrost, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Somr, C.H.   King, R.H.
(Pergélisol-Canada : actes de la cinquième Conférence canadienne sur le pergélisol = Permafrost-Canada : proceedings of the Fifth Canadian Permafrost Conference. Collection Nordicana, no 54, 1990, p. 11-16, ill., maps)
References.
French abstract provided.
ASTIS record 31112.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/cpc/CPC5-11.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Features identified as polygonal peat plateaus have formed under conditions of continuous permafrost in the Truelove Lowland, northeastern Devon Island, N.W.T. The features, ranging in size from 300 m² to 0.5 km², have formed in sediments associated with shallow lakes. Permafrost aggradation into these lake sediments has been a consequence of glacio-isostatic uplift during the last 10 500 years and the progressive emergence of the Lowland from the sea. Coastal lakes which began as a series of marine lagoons have been successively isolated, flushed with fresh water and infilled with organic and inorganic sediments. As a result of the aggradation of permafrost into the saturated lacustrine sediments raised mounds have formed underlain by ground ice comprising both segregated and intrusive ice lenses. The development of epigenetic ice wedges has led, in turn, to the formation of a polygonal patterned ground delimiting the individual raised mounds. During the summer months the flow of surface water through the ice wedge depressions is eroding the sides of the raised polygonal mounds causing a degraded appearance. (Au)

C, A, H, B, F
Algae; Bottom sediments; Cores; Density; Frozen ground; Ice wedges; Lichens; Moisture content of permafrost; Mosses; Patterned ground; Peat; Permafrost; Soil moisture; Soil profiles; Soils; Tundra ponds

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Origin of polygonal peat plateaus under conditions of continuous permafrost, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Somr, C.H.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1991.
212 p.
Thesis (M.Sc.) - Dept. of Geography, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1991.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32286.
Languages: English

Features representing polygonal peat plateaus have formed under conditions of continuous permafrost in Truelove Lowland, northeastern Devon Island, N.W.T. The features, ranging in size from 300 m² to 0.5 km², have formed in sediments representing a number of depositional environments as a result of the progressive emergence of the Lowland from the sea during the last 10,500 years. The features, composed of individual mounds, up to 1.5 m in height and 10 m in diameter, are separated by a polygonal network of ice wedge depressions. The aggradation of permafrost into saturated sediments has resulted in the formation of horizontal lenses of segregated and intrusive ice as thick as 1.5 m which underlie the centre of the mound and contribute to the raised nature of the feature. Coring of the features and subsequent chemical analysis has revealed that sand and silt-sized inorganic basal sediments of the mounds have higher sodium and potassium concentrations than the remainder of the core due to a marine depositional environment. High calcium and magnesium concentrations throughout the core can be attributed to the calcareous nature of the surficial sediments and bedrock of the Lowland. Organic matter contents well in excess of 20% with ash contents <80% indicate that the majority of the remaining sediments are peat. In the Phalarope Feature the majority of the organic sediments are blue-green algae with C:N ratios > 10, indicative of aquatic peat. The peat which caps the Phalarope Feature and comprises the majority of the Lower Beschel Feature is a combination of sedge-fen and sedge-brown moss-fen peat. Brown moss-fen peat is found in the water-saturated ice wedge depressions where lower pH values occur. Chemical, physical and isotopic analysis of the horizontal ice lenses of the Phalarope and Lower Beschel Features indicate that the ice has formed by segregation under rapid freezing conditions in a closed-system. The remainder of the ice in the sediments ... [consists] of pore ice and reticulate vein ice. Lack of variation in the chemical and oxygen isotope data indicates the horizontal ice lens of the Little Beschel Feature is intrusive ice that has formed under open-system conditions. Through stratigraphic and chemical analysis of cores from the study sites, it appears that the features have developed as a result of a progressive change of the sites from a marine environment to a lacustrine one, and with continued uplift, ending in a terrestrial environment. This has preserved inorganic, aquatic peat, sedge-fen peat, sedge-brown moss-fen peat and brown moss-fen peat. The aggradation of permafrost into the saturated sediments at the sites formed the ground ice present, thus elevating the features above the surrounding terrain. Subsequent slow erosion of the sides of the mounds has accentuated their raised polygonal appearance. (Au)

A, C, B
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Composition; Coring; Cyanophyceae; Erosion; Ground ice; Peat; Periglacial landforms; Permafrost; Sedimentation; Stratigraphy; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Factors influencing nitrogen inputs by associative cyanobacteria in the Canadian Arctic   /   Stewart, K.J.   Coxson, D.   Lamb, E.   Siciliano, S.D.
In: International Polar Year Oslo Science Conference, 2010, 8-12 June. - [Oslo : Research Council of Norway, 2010], presentation no. PS1-C.26, [1] p.
Abstract of a poster presentation, taken from the USB flash drive distributed at the conference.
ASTIS record 71705.
Languages: English

A major source of nitrogen input in Arctic ecosystems is through nitrogen fixation by associative cyanobacteria. Nitrogen is a key factor limiting primary productivity in cold northern environments. Factors controlling nitrogen cycling need to be understood in order to predict future nitrogen availability under changing climatic conditions. We assessed nitrogen fixation via Acetylene Reduction Assays (ARA) across several ecosystem units in an Arctic tundra landscape at Daring Lake, NWT. Models predicting nitrogen fixation based on moisture and surface temperature were used to estimate nitrogen input over the growing season. The percent cover of nitrogen fixing associations in each of the main ecosystem units was determined. Nitrogen input within the landscape was estimated at approximately 2.3 kg/ha/yr and was largely driven by associations with Sphagnum spp. Nitrogen fixation was also assessed at Alexandra Fiord, Ellesmere Island and Truelove, Devon Island. We used multi-group Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) with vegetation cover and soil characteristic variables to separate the direct and indirect effects of soil moisture, plant community functional composition, and bryophyte and lichen abundance on rates of nitrogen fixation. The presence of bryophytes had a strong positive influence on nitrogen fixation at all but one site. Soil moisture appears to be an important factor in determining the presence of bryophytes. Linkages between nitrogen fixation and other nitrogen cycling processes were examined at Alexandra Fiord. Surface samples were measured for both gas fluxes (CO2, N2O) and nitrogen fixation (ARA). The soil immediately below the surface (up to 5 cm depth) was sampled for dissolved organic N and a 15N pool dilution method was used to determine gross mineralization and nitrification rates. The linkages between these nitrogen cycling processes are still under investigation. An understanding of both N input and N cycling processes is essential in determining the implications of climate change. Keywords: nitrogen fixation, nitrogen cycling, associative cyanobacteria, bryophyte. (Au)

H, C, E, J
Bryophytes; Carbon dioxide; Climate change; Cyanophyceae; Environmental impacts; Lichens; Mathematical models; Mosses; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Plant cover; Plant distribution; Plant-soil relationships; Soil moisture; Surface temperature; Tundra ecology

G0812, G0813
Alexandra Fiord region, Nunavut; Daring Lake, N.W.T.; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The Northern Heritage Society : developing indigenous and appropriate science in the north   /   Strahlendorf, P.W.   Bielawski, E.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Northern Heritage Society, 1986.
[15] leaves ; 28 cm.
References.
ASTIS record 45810.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The major objective of the Northern Heritage Society is to preserve and promote cultural and natural heritage through research, education and training. Through its projects, the NHS promotes science education and job training for young northerners. It strives for the mutual education of the people of the north and for scientists, educators and other interest groups, to the advantage of all parties .... Begun in 1979 by researchers deeply committed to involving northerners in research, to education and training, as well as to conducting research of the highest quality, it is today maintained by a growing staff and alumni participants. It works towards two general goals: heritage resource conservation, and human resource development. The program began as an archaeological field school. It has since expanded to include ecology and earth science components. ... The curriculum covers standard field and lab methods, arctic prehistory, history, ecology, and physical geography. The field and classroom aspects serve ideally to demonstrate the integration of environmental and cultural developments. Modern northern society is discussed in the context of past and present human adaptations to environment, to other cultural groups,and to change. Most importantly, the students participate directly in research and work closely with scientists as role models. There is a strong hidden curriculum, based on the premise that a secure sense of one's heritage gives each individual a stronger, more adaptively successful sense of self in today's world .... Furthermore, students are encouraged to understand science and its role in the changing north, as they will be the people eventually responsible for evaluating, and living with, the results of research and development. ... The project operated from 1979-1983 on Somerset Island, and is now established on Devon Island. ... (Au)

R, U, J, A, T
Archaeology; Culture (Anthropology); Curricula; Ecology; Education; Education; Geography; Intercultural education; Inuit; Native peoples; Native peoples; Northern Heritage Society; Occupational training; Public participation; Research; Science; Self-determination

G0813, G0812
N.W.T.; Nunavut; Somerset Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Acetylene reduction assay for nitrogen fixation under field conditions in remote areas   /   Stutz, R.C.   Bliss, L.C.
(Plant and soil, v. 38, no. 1, Feb. 1973, p. 209-213, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 4)
(Canadian Committee for the IBP contribution, no. 173)
References.
ASTIS record 43813.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1007/BF00011228

A method for intensively sampling soil for nitrogen fixation potential using acetylene reduction assay is discussed. Acetylene was generated from calcium carbide. Soil cores were incubated in Mason jars with specially adapted lids. Air samples from the jars were stored and transported over dry KOH in 10 ml serum vials. The method overcomes many problems associated with other sampling procedures, and produces statistically reproducible data. (Au)

C, H
Beaches; Dryas; Meadows; Nitrogen cycling; Saxifraga; Sedges; Soils; Testing

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Nitrogen fixation in soils of Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Northwest Territories   /   Stutz, R.C.   Bliss, L.C.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 53, no. 14, July 15, 1975, p.1387-1399, ill., 1 map)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 28)
References.
ASTIS record 38898.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b75-168
Libraries: ACU

Biological nitrogen fixation was studied on Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., in three different habitats. Raised beach ridges, resulting from postglacial uplift, form well-defined xeric habitats, which are dominated by dwarf shrubs and cushion plants. Hummocky sedge meadows with associated mosses and forbs comprise the second intensively studied habitat. Waterlogged wet sedge meadows with moss were studied less intensively. Nitrogen fixation was estimated using acetylene-reduction assay. Incubation temperatures were moderated by burying the jars in soil pits (10 cm) on site. Available nitrogen was determined by microkjeldahl analysis of KCl soil extracts. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by vascular plants is nil on Truelove Lowland. One lichen species, Peltigera aphthosa, reduced acetylene (5.1 µmol/mg/h). Nostoc commune, a prominent blue-green alga on meadow soils, reduced acetylene at a rate 10 times that of P. aphthosa. An estimated 30 and 7 mg N/m²/year was fixed by bacteria and soil algae in beach ridge soil in 1971 and 1972 respectively, and 380 and 120 mg N/m²/year was fixed in meadow soils in the same years. (Au)

H, J, C, A
Beaches; Cyanophyceae; Meadows; Mosses; Nitrogen; Nitrogen cycling; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Plant-soil relationships; Sedges; Soils; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Biological nitrogen fixation in High Arctic soils, Truelove Lowland   /   Stutz, R.C.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 301-314
References.
ASTIS record 16645.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Studies of nitrogen fixation in remote natural systems were made feasible by the development of acetylene reduction assays (Stewart et al. 1967). These assays are based on the observation that acetylene is a competitive inhibitor of nitrogen on the nitrogen fixing enzyme (Dilworth 1966). The assay involves incubating biological material in the presence of acetylene and measuring the rate of ethylene evolution. Ethylene can be detected in minute quantities by gas chromatography. Ethylene production can be related to nitrogen fixation by comparing acetylene reduction with N15 assays or changes in total nitrogen content. Generally the ratio between acetylene reduction and nitrogen fixation is between 1.5:1 and 25:1 (Hardy et al. 1973). For soil systems the ratio is generally between 3 and 6:1. (Au)

C, H
Chromatography; Evolution (Biology); Nitrogen cycling; Soils

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The use of autoradiography in determining active and inactive roots in plant production studies   /   Svoboda, J.   Bliss, L.C.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 6, no. 3, Winter 1974, p. 257-260, ill.)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 9)
(Canadian Committee for the IBP contribution, no. 284)
References.
ASTIS record 38954.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550061
Libraries: ACU

An autoradiographic technique was used to estimate the level of translocation between shoots and roots immediately after snowmelt and to determine the proportion of the live and dead roots of Dryas integrifolia cushion plants in a high arctic locality in the middle of the growing season. (Au)

H
Dryas; Isotopes; Plant collections; Plant growth; Plant physiology; Primary production (Biology); Roots; Snowmelt

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Ecology and primary production of raised beach communities, Truelove Lowland   /   Svoboda, J.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 185-216
References.
ASTIS record 16637.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Raised beaches have a special ecological significance for Truelove Lowland and can be classified as a part of the Polar Semi-desert. In terms of species diversity and plant production the plant communities are depauperate, yet they are richer than the true Polar Desert. Although this vegetation type, dominated by cushion plants, is of rather limited extent in the Queen Elizabeth Islands, it covers vast areas of the southern arctic islands. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe the plant communities and estimate standing crop and net plant production; and (2) to contribute to the understanding of primary production processes and survival strategy in cushion plants by studying phenology, growth, chemical components, and plant structure. The field study was conducted during the summers of 1970 through 1973. (Au)

H, A
Beaches; Plant ecology; Polar semi-deserts; Primary production (Biology); Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic cushion plants as fallout 'monitors'   /   Svoboda, J.   Hutchison-Benson, E.   Taylor, H.W.
(Journal of environmental radioactivity, v. 4, no. 1, 1986, p. 65-76, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 42857.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1016/0265-931X(86)90021-4

The internal distribution of fallout 137Cs was determined for arctic cushion plants Dryas integrifolia, Silene acaulis and the bryophytes Rhacomitrium lanuginosum and Polytrichum juniperinum collected at various latitudes in the Canadian Arctic. The results indicate that these plants have functioned as biological monitors of radioactive fallout and it is suggested that analysis of the internal distribution of 137Cs could serve as a model for other airborne contaminants. (Au)

H, J, E
Air pollution; Bryophytes; Dryas; Effects monitoring; Radionuclides; Silene

G0813
Ellesmere Island, Nunavut; Somerset Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Periodic control of flowering of a High Arctic plant species by fluctuating light regimes   /   Teeri, J.A.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 6, no. 3, Summer 1974, p. 275-279)
References.
ASTIS record 38955.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550063
Libraries: ACU

Plants of Saxifraga rivularis L., grown from high arctic (75 41 N) seed sources, flower during an uninterrupted light intensity regime of ca. 0.3 ly/min in a growth chamber. If this light regime is interrupted daily by 6 hr of darkness, or by 6 hr of low intensity light (ca. 0.1 ly/min), the plants are prevented from flowering. This flowering response is independent of several tested chamber temperature regimes. A light-intensity trigger mechanism in high arctic plants, if operative in the field, would have a high adaptive value similar to the day-night photoperiodic trigger mechanism of lower latitude plants. (Au)

H
Adaptation (Biology); Flowers; Light; Photoperiodism; Plant growth; Plant reproduction; Saxifraga; Seeds; Snowmelt

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Detritus transport by wind in a High Arctic terrestrial ecosystem   /   Teeri, J.A.   Barrett, P.E.
(Arctic and alpine research, v. 7, no. 4, Autumn 1975, p. 387-391)
References.
ASTIS record 38956.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.2307/1550182
Libraries: ACU

In a High Arctic lowland ecosystem wind transported organic matter is frequently deposited in late snowbank habitats on the slopes of raised beachridges. Analysis of this detritus indicates its principal source is the adjacent snowfree beachcrest. In some snowbank locations this wind transported detritus may account for 10 to 20% of the yearly accumulation of organic matter and may provide an additional supply of nutrients. (Au)

H, A, C, J
Beaches; Formation; Meadows; Plant nutrition; Plants (Biology); Snowdrifts; Soils; Tundra ecology; Wind erosion

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Variability in photoperiod and the inhibition of flowering in a high latitude population of Saxifraga rivularis   /   Teeri, J.A.   Tonsor, S.J.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 59, no. 3, Mar. 1981, p. 388-391, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 6158.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b81-052
Libraries: ACU

A population of Saxifraga rivularis L. collected at Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada (75° 41' N) exhibits a photoperiodic control of flowering in controlled environment chambers. The plants respond in a manner typical of long-day plants with flowering inhibited by either a 6-h daily dark period, or by a 6-h daily low intensity irradiance regime of incadescent light. The inhibition of flowering by 6 h/day of incandenscent light does not occur if the incadescent light is given in twelve 0.5-h doses, each followed by 1 h of red-rich high intensity irradiance. (Au)

H
Photoperiodism; Plant distribution; Plant physiology; Plant reproduction; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Biological research at the Arctic Institute field camp on Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Thibodeau, B.
Poster presented at the First Erindale College Symposium in Biology, 1990.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 31094.
Languages: English

Truelove Lowland on Devon Island (75 33 N, 84 40 W) is an excellent research area to study the limitations imposed upon plant growth. Close to the research station which is operated by the Arctic Institute of North America are several discrete sites with differing microclimate and environmental conditions. The High Arctic is mostly polar desert with sparse vegetation. Truelove Lowland is one of a small number of sites accounting for less than 6% of the arctic land mass with significant biological diversity. A wide array of different arctic plants and animals species are found in this small area. The range of soil conditions makes this an ideal site to study nitrogen limitation of plant growth. We here describe selected species for analysis of their response to nitrogen. (Au)

H, I
Arctic Institute of North America; Biology; Composition; Nitrogen; Plant growth; Plant-soil relationships; Plants (Biology); Polar deserts; Research; Research stations; Soils

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Pedogenesis in the sorted pattened ground of Devon Plateau, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada   /   Ugolini, F.C.   Corti, G.   Certini, G.
(Geoderma, v.136, no. 1-2, 1 Dec. 2006, p. 87-106, ill., maps)
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 60614.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2006.03.030
Libraries: ACU

In the High Arctic, the barren expanses of Devon Plateau, Devon Island, are affected by intense frost action that conditions geomorphic processes at the landscape level, soil formation at the profile level, and the establishment and distribution of vascular plants at microsites. In the High Arctic, in areas of patterned ground, frost action is responsible for both the accumulation of parent material through the segregation of fines in features here called "islands of fines" and for the development of soil profiles through cryoturbation in these features. At the landscape level, segregation of fines results in the development of patterned ground, specifically in the formation of sorted stripes, sorted circles and plugs that repeat themselves on the landscape. Plugs consist of cylindrical to conical soil masses protruding from the frost/permafrost table in the stony areas that may coalesce to form island of fines. Cryoturbation, the dominant soil forming process, is manifested by the appearance of convoluted horizons, injection of material, up-heaving of stones and soil mixing. But there are also non-cryoturbated soils with A-B-C vertical sequences. We have described, sampled and analyzed the soils simultaneously present in the islands of fines. Also, we have examined the plugs, the stony areas and the stony borders. Non-cryoturbated soils, Typic Haplorthels or Brunosolic Eutric Static Cryosols, occurred at the edges of the sorted circles, once the injection of heaved material has subsided. They showed an A horizon grayish brown, relatively rich in carbon and nitrogen, sandier than the underlying B horizon, which is characterized by the presence of illuvial silt caps. The C horizon is low in organic carbon and nitrogen and poorly rooted. Despite wet conditions and impeded drainage, because of the high pH, low organic matter content and low biological activity, oxidation/reduction processes are not well expressed. C-horizon material injected from the frost/permafrost table penetrated into the body of the island of fines, rupturing horizons and merging at the surface. These soils are Aquic Haploturbels or Gleysolic Turbic Cryosols. The major soil forming processes that are acting in the Haplorthels or Brunosolic Cryosols include: brunification, lessivage and decarbonation/carbonation. In the Aquic Haploturbels or Gleysolic Turbic Cryosols the processes are: cryoturbation, gleying and decarbonation/carbonation. Stony areas play the important role of trapping air-born dust that includes mineral and organic components. Also autochthonous living organisms dwell in these block fields. The air-born mineral fines together with those left by the receding ice-cap and those produced by weathering aliment the formation of plugs, islands of fines and the sorted stripes. (Au)

A, C, H, J
Carbon; Frost action; Frozen ground; Geology; Geomorphology; Moisture transfer; Mosses; Nitrogen; Patterned ground; Periglacial landforms; Permafrost; Physical properties; Plant distribution; Plant ecology; Plant-soil relationships; Plant-water relationships; Podzols; Sand; Silt; Soil chemistry; Soil classification; Soil moisture; Soil profiles; Soil texture; Soils; Weathering

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Arctic research review   /   United States. Office of Naval Research [Sponsor]
[S.l. : Arctic Institute of North America], 1961.
8 pieces : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Contains: Arctic research review - Ottawa, and Canada's national capital region - Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Canada's north - Welcome to Thule, 4683rd Air Defence Wing - Inuvik, place of man - This is the Arctic - Vacation guide to Canada's Northwest Territories - Northwest Territories, geographical aspects - Scientific research and northern development - The promise of the Canadian north - Mining in the Arctic - Devon Island expedition, 1960-1961 - Scientific program - Imperial Oil review, October 1960.
ASTIS record 32848.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

This portfolio contains pamphlets, speeches, and reports on the Arctic. The objectives of the report are: "1) To obtain an appreciation of programs and facilities for Arctic research by an on-the-ground evaluation and review. 2) To ascertain the requirements for future research." (ASTIS)

W, R, T, P, L, S, A
Acculturation; Geography; Hunting; Inuit; Mining; Research; Research stations; Social conditions; Towns; Transportation; Travels

G081, G0813
Canadian Arctic; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Contributions to the Tardigrada of the Canadian High-Arctic. 1. Freshwater tardigrades from Devon Island, Northwest Territories   /   Van Rompu, E.A.   De Smet, W.H.   Beyens, L.
(Canadian field-naturalist, v.106, no. 3, July-Sept. 1992, p. 303-310, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 43120.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

A list of thirteen species of Tardigrada from freshwater habitats on Devon Island (75 30 N) is given. The most frequently occurring species were Isohypsibius granulifer, I. papillifer bulbosus and Hypsibius dujardini. ... The present paper deals with the tardigrade species found in a small number of samples from freshwater habitats, collected on Truelove and Sparbo-Hardy Lowlands, Devon Island. ... (Au)

I, H, F, A
Animal distribution; Animal taxonomy; Coasts; Fresh-water ecology; Mosses; Plankton; Tardigrada; Tundra ponds

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Holocene paleolimnology of a High Arctic lake, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Vandenbygaart, B.J.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1991.
70 p.
Thesis (B.Sc.) - Dept of Geography, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1991.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32287.
Languages: English

The paleolimnology of a High Arctic lake formed by isostatic rebound on the north shore of Devon Island was studied. Examining the chemostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of lake sediments from Immerk Lake, a chronology of environmental change during lake development was determined. A study of the biostratigraphy concluded that the lake sediments cored contained a complete record of transition from marine inundation to the present freshwater lake phase. It was concluded that Br, Ca and As distributions were useful in distinguishing between marine, brackish and freshwater sediments. By analyzing certain erosion indicators in the sediments, information concerning the post-lake emergence environment was studied. Brackish and early freshwater sediments were high in concentrations of erosion indicators. Vegetation colonization and soil development in the catchment followed, resulting in decreases in the input of erosion indicators in the lake. A change from warmer to cooler conditions was estimated at about 3500 yr B.P., a documented date in literature on Holocene climatic change in the Queen Elizabeth Islands. (Au)

B, A, E, G, J
Bottom sediments; Chemical properties; Climate change; Composition; Cores; Erosion; Ice cover; Palaeoecology; Palaeogeography; Palaeontology; Recent epoch; Sedimentation; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


A key and annotated synopsis of the mosses of the northern lowlands of Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Vitt, D.H.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 53, no. 19, Oct. 1, 1975, p.2158-2197, ill., 1 map)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 12)
References.
ASTIS record 38899.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b75-242
Libraries: ACU

The moss flora of the northern lowlands of Devon Island (75 33 N, 84 40 W) is reported to consist of 131 species and 2 varieties. Forty-five of these are reported as new to the island. Sphagnum orientale L. Savicz. is reported as new to North America and Plagiobryum zierii (Hedw.) Lindb. and Polytrichum algidum Hag. & C. Jens. are reported as new to the Queen Elizabeth Islands. A key is given to the species and varieties, which is followed by a discussion of critical taxonomic and ecologic criteria for each species. (Au)

H, I, J
Animal waste products; Mosses; Muskoxen; Plant distribution; Plant growth; Plant taxonomy; Tundra ecology

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The bryophyte vegetation, production, and organic components of Truelove Lowland   /   Vitt, D.H.   Pakarinen, P.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 225-243, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16641.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... On Truelove Lowland, where 41% of the Lowland is composed of Carex stans dominated meadow, bryophytes, particularly mosses, form an almost continuous cover. The water budget, nutrient status, soil formation, depth of active layer, and growth of other plants are strongly influenced by this bryophyte layer (see also Crum 1972). In the drier habitats, mosses and hepatics usually play a minor role, with lichens and various vascular plants often forming a large part of the phytomass (Richardson and Finegan, Svoboda both this volume). In July and August, 1971 and 1972, field studies were undertaken to: (1) accurately describe the bryophyte vegetation; (2) determine the species diversity and composition of the Lowland areas; (3) analyze the amounts of bryophyte phytomass and production in the major vegetation types of the Lowland; and (4) relate production to differences of chlorophyll, inorganic and organic components, caloric content, microhabitat, and growth of bryophyte species. (Au)

H
Active layer; Bryophytes; Frozen ground; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


D.C. resistivity soundings on Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Vögtli, K.
(Journal of glaciology, v. 6, no. 47, 1967, p. 635-642, ill., 1 map)
References.
ASTIS record 40957.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Ice thickness and resistivity of an Arctic glacier have been systematically investigated by the geoelectrical method. Further measurements were carried out on the ice cap. Favourable conditions for soundings were encountered, since the ice masses proved to be generally homogenous, and there was a sufficient difference between the resistivities of ice and bedrock, while the surface layer differed only very little from the ice mass. A higher resistivity was found for bedrock than for the ice. (Au)

F, B
Electrical properties; Equipment and supplies; Glaciers; Ice caps; Measurement; Rocks; Thickness

G0813
Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut; Sverdrup Glacier, Nunavut


Soils of the Truelove Lowland and vicinity, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Walker, B.D.
Ottawa : National Library of Canada, 1977.
2 microfiches : ill., maps ; 11 x 15 cm.
(Canadian theses on microfiche, no. 30860)
Thesis (M.Sc.) - University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta., 1976.
Appendix.
Bibliography: p.118-125.
Paper copy collation: xvi, 171 p.
ASTIS record 3956.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

The Truelove Lowland and adjacent upland to the east were investigated to determine kinds and distribution of soils. The tentative Cryosolic Order was used to classify the soils to the subgroup level. ... Distributions of soil map units, based on the "soil series" or complexes of "soil series", are depicted on an orthophoto mosaic base with a scale of approximately 1:15,000. ... Generally, soils of the study area are alkaline, calcareous, base saturated, nonsaline, and coarse textured (sandy loam to sand) with variable coarse fragment contents. Organic layers and soils are generally quite fibrous and slightly acid to neutral in reaction. (Au)

C
Soil classification; Soil surveys; Soils; Theses

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Soils of Truelove Lowland and plateau   /   Walker, B.D.   Peters, T.W.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 31-62, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16629.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

... The prime objective of this paper is to depict local distribution of soils within Truelove Lowland. Mapping problems, alluded to above, were overcome through: (1) recognition of frost disturbance as a pedogenic factor; (2) adherence to the pedon concept (Soil Survey Staff 1960) as specified for northern soils (Canada Soil Survey Committee 1973); and (3) use of a tentative classification system for northern soils - the Cryosolic Order (C.S.S.C. 1973). Consequently mapping difficulties have been reduced to dependence upon complexities in parent material types and vegetation and drainage patterns. Such is the case on the Truelove Lowland sector of the study area. Soil map units relate, via legend format, soil subgroup classes (C.S.S.C. 1973) with parent materials, drainage patterns, periglacial features, and plant community types. It is hoped that the mapped distribution of these units (based on soil series or complexes) will provide a land base for interpretation or extrapolation of other ecological data gathered within the framework of the Devon Island I.B.P. program. A secondary objective was to characterize some of the major or significant soils of the study area. ... (Au)

C
Soil classification; Soils

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Comparison of the estimates of annual vascular plant production on Truelove Lowland made by harvesting and by gas exchange   /   Whitfield, D.W.A.   Goodwin, C.R.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 315-321, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16646.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

Annual above and belowground vascular plant production was measured by harvesting methods, for Dryas integrifolia and for hummocky sedge-moss meadow gramineae, by Svoboda (this volume) and Muc (this volume), respectively. On the same sites, Mayo et al. (this volume) measured whole plant net CO2 exchange by Dryas and by Carex stans using differential IRGA techniques. The latter measurements were made over 24 hr periods at irregular intervals during the growing season. This paper is an effort to compare these two sets of measurements using a simple curve-fit modelling approach. The procedure used is very similar to that of Scott and Billings (1964). This is not a self-consistent model of plant production and was not intended as such. It is a check of consistency between two very different measurement methods which should, within measurement error, give the same answer. ... (Au)

H
Plant respiration; Primary production (Biology)

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Microbiology and decomposition on Truelove Lowland   /   Widden, P.
In: Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, Canada : a High Arctic ecosystem / Edited by L.C. Bliss. - Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta Press, 1977, p. 505-530, ill.
References.
ASTIS record 16664.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

...The present paper deals primarily with the description of microbial populations as they occur in the field, and lays particular stress on the nature of the fungal populations and the response of individual isolates to varied environmental parameters. Some laboratory studies on bacteria are reported on here, but the responses of specific bacterial isolates have been studied in more depth by Nelson (this volume). During the present study an attempt was also made to obtain field data on the weight loss rates of natural plant remains (Carex stans litter and Dryas integrifolia litter). In order to gain some "index" of decomposition which could be compared directly with other I.B.P. study sites, weight loss of cellulose in the soil was also studied. Due to technical problems, no data on Dryas decomposition are available. (Au)

H, J
Biodegradation; Fungi; Microbial ecology; Soil microorganisms; Tundra ecology

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Populations of fungi in a High Arctic ecosystem   /   Widden, P.   Parkinson, D.
(Canadian journal of botany, v. 57, no. 21, Nov. 1, 1979, p.2408-2417, ill., 1 map)
(Devon Island IBP Project contribution, no. 36)
References.
ASTIS record 3305.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1139/b79-284
Libraries: ACU

A study of the fungal flora of soils, plant leaves, and litter was undertaken on the Truelove Lowland, on the north coast of Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada. A total of 53 taxa from 33 genera were identified, 27 from leaves and litter and 46 from soil, using soil-washing and plating as isolation methods. ... Use of direct observation methods showed that fungal biomass in meadow soils was much higher than in raised beach soils. ... In comparison with other tundra regions, the Truelove Lowland appears to have moderately rich mycoflora, containing taxa common both in temperate regions and in other tundra soils. Total fungal biomass in Truelove Lowland soils was found to be low in comparison with many tundra regions. (Au)

H
Biomass; Fungi; Tundra ecology

G0813
Arctic regions; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Heterotrophy in arctic sublittoral seaweeds : an hypothesis   /   Wilce, R.T.
(Botanica marina, v. 10, fasc. 3/4, Dec. 1967, p. 185-197, ill.)
References.
ASTIS record 43041.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

While working with arctic benthic algal populations off Devon Island, Canada when the sea was still frozen, I was impressed by the poor light conditions under the thick ice, even though the sun was high overhead. I began to wonder how these attached plants survive long periods without photosynthesis. Could they possibly be supporting themselves, at least partially, by some mode of nutrition other than photoautotrophy? This is not a new question. Kjellman (1883) was perhaps the first phycologist to suggest that deep water algae might not survive solely through their own photosynthesis in the arctic. Work with benthic plants in East Greenland prompted Lund (1958) to write: "The possibility suggests itself that the algae in question are, in fact, mixotrophic. The photosynthesis might even be of secondary importance as compared with the absorption of organic matter directly from the bottom of the sea." The question has been asked before - but not loudly. The answer to that question will be found in this paper. ... (Au)

H, G, J
Adaptation (Biology); Algae; Photosynthesis; Plant growth; Plant nutrition; Sea ice; Sea ice ecology; Solar radiation; Winter ecology

G0815, G0812
Devon Island waters, Nunavut; Mould Bay (Weather Station), N.W.T.


Applications of diatoms to environmental reconstruction on northeastern Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic   /   Wolfe, A.
Paper presented at the Ontario Association of Geomorphologists Annual Meeting, Queen's University, April 23 & 24, 1990.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 31082.
Languages: English

From field observations, the geomorphology of coastal lowlands on northeastern Devon Island may alternately be interpreted as highly dynamic (e.g. active hillslope and nivation processes, strong mechanical weathering) or relatively static (e.g. reflect periglacial features, weakness of soil development). The examination of lake sediments from Truelove Lowland attempts to address these questions of postglacial environmental stability. Analyses of modern diatoms, environmentally sensitive algae that preserve well in sediment, have provided analogs for a variety of limnological conditions. However, the subfossil floras from all cores investigated thus far indicate very little biostratigraphic change since the lakes' early Holocene isostatic isolation from the sea. This highly pervasive diatom assemblage, dominated by small benthic species of Frafilaria, seems to favour the hypothesis of stable Holocene conditions. However, it remains possible that the lake biota has a somewhat attenuated response to changes on land, or that the dominance of this diatom community is such that neither environmental fluctuations nor potentially successive ecological series have replaced it. (Au)

B, A, H, J
Algae; Bottom sediments; Climate change; Coring; Diatoms; Effects of climate on plants; Fresh-water ecology; Palaeogeography; Palaeontology; Plant distribution; Plant succession; Recent epoch

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Diatom geobotany, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Wolfe, A.   King, R.H.
In: 19th Arctic Workshop, March 8-10, 1990, INSTAAR, University of Colorado : program and abstracts. - Boulder, Colo. : INSTAAR, 1990, p. 96-98, ill.
ASTIS record 31083.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

In the High Arctic, palynology is hampered by low pollen production and poor dispersal of local pollen types, and therefore diatoms offer an attractive alternate source of biological proxy data for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. However, due to the paucity of taxonomic and ecological information regarding arctic diatoms, detailed surveys of modern floras are needed to justify subsequent paleoecological interpretations. Truelove Lowland (75 33 N, 84 40 W), a 43 km² polar oasis on northeastern Devon Island, is well suited for this type of study, since 22% of the lowland is covered by lakes and ponds representing a variety of environmental gradients with respect to morphometry, salinity, and substrate/sediment types. The modern freshwater diatom flora sampled comprises 126 taxa from 29 genera and 7 orders. The dominant genera are Navicula (20 taxa), Cymbella (18), Fragilaria (14), Nitzschia (9), Achnanthes (9), and Pinnularia (8), which represent a predominantly benthic littoral flora with some forms typical of subareal habitats. (Au)

H, B, J, F
Bottom sediments; Cores; Diatoms; Fresh-water ecology; Fresh-water flora; Lakes; Palaeobotany; Palaeoecology; Palynology; Plant distribution; Plant taxonomy

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Modern diatom assemblages and their limnological significance, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Wolfe, A.P.
London, Ont. : University of Western Ontario, 1989.
1 v.
Thesis (B.Sc. Honours) - University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., 1989.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 30192.
Languages: English

Modern samples of organic sediments, representing a variety of lacustrine, lagoonal, and marine littoral sedimentary environments were analyzed for siliceous microfossils, including diatoms, chrysophycean stomatocysts, and rhizopod scales. Six distinct ecological assemblages are defined by taxonomic differentiation and biogeographic distribution: large lowland lakes, shallow ponds, humic habitats, polar desert lakes, brackish lagoons, and marine littoral. The distinct nature of these environments serves to outline the various controls on high arctic diatom communities. Differences in salinity, productivity, and lake ice conditions play crucial roles in determining the floral composition at a given site. With this autecological information, more precise reconstructions from the Holocene fossil record are made possible. (Au)

B, H, J
Biological productivity; Bottom sediments; Diatoms; Fresh-water biology; Lake ice; Palaeobotany; Palaeontology; Plant distribution; Plant ecology; Polar deserts; Recent epoch; Theses

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Diatoms, lake sediments, and environmental history; three case studies from the Canadian Arctic   /   Wolfe, A.P.
Paper presented at the Geography Graduate Students' Conference, Penn State University, University Park, Penn., February 17, 1991.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 32245.
Languages: English

Three case studies demonstrate the use of paleolimnology in the reconstruction of environmental changes of different magnitudes and at different timescales. On northeastern Devon Island, a sediment core was recovered that embraces both transgressive and regressive facies of the most recent Quaternary sea level cycle. Beneath these fossiliferous shallow marine sediments, organic sediments containing a pioneering diatom flora of Fragilaria pinnata were dated to 27000 yrs. BP. This indicates a stable high arctic lacustrine environment that precludes the possibility of contiguous Late Quaternary glaciation in Jones Sound between Devon and Ellesmere Islands. In upland lakes on Cumberland Peninsula, the last 10000 years are preserved in sediment cores. A diverse diatom flora flourished until about 9000 years BP, when climate cooled during the Cockburn Stade of Late Foxe glaciation. After this shutdown of lake productivity, a primarily ecological succession of diatom ensued: Fragilaria spp., replacement by Pinnularia biceps, and finally the development of a planktonic flora with abundant Aulacoseira distans subspp. At the water supply reservoir of Pond Inlet, the upper 2 cm of a 40 cm core contain diatoms that suggest that deepening of the lake into a reservoir produced more favourable habitats for a variety of benthic lifeforms. (Au)

B, A, H
Bottom sediments; Climate change; Coring; Diatoms; Glacial epoch; Glaciation; Lakes; Palaeobotany; Quaternary period; Refugia

G0813
Pangnirtung region, Nunavut; Pond Inlet region, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Retrieval of cores for diatom and geochemical analyses from five High Arctic lakes, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Young, R.B.
Paper presented at the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, Ottawa, November 18-19, 1986.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28350.
Languages: English

Truelove Lowland (75 33 N, 84 40 W), Devon Island is a high Arctic 'oasis' which has undergone isostatic rebound for the past 10,000 years. As a result, the lowland is typified by a series of raised beaches separated by wet meadows and lakes which represent former littoral zones. The purpose of this project is to use diatom and geochemical information obtained from the sediments of lakes at different elevations in order to reconstruct the evolution of the Truelove Lowland. Diatoms will be used to delineate salt water/fresh water transition and any subsequent marine transgressions. The relative abundance of chemical elements within the sediments will be used to identify: erosional environments (K, Na, Al, Ti), soil leaching (Cl, B) and organic productivity (biogenic Si, Mn, Fe). Five lakes in the lowland region were sampled. Cores were taken through a hole drilled in the lake ice using a Livingstone corer. Sediments were extruded and subsampled in 20 cm units. Average core length was 65.5 cm. Further subsampling to 2 cm units was completed at the base camp prior to shipment to prevent liquifaction of the samples. (Au)

B, A
Beaches; Bottom sediments; Coast changes; Composition; Coring; Diatoms; Geochemistry; Lakes; Leaching; Meadows; Palaeogeography; Sea level

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


The reconstruction of paleoenvironmental changes in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Young, R.B.   Kelly, P.   Heyes, A.   Law, K.   King, H.
In: Student research in Canada's North : Proceedings of the National Student Conference on Northern Studies, November 18-19, 1986 / Edited by W. Peter Adams and Peter G. Johnson. - Ottawa : ACUNS, 1988, p. 215-220
References.
Abstract in English and French.
ASTIS record 28351.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU

An investigation of the paleoenvironmental record preserved in the surficial sediments in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. is presently underway. Glacioisostatic rebound over the last 20,000 years has resulted in an emerged coastal lowland containing a number of large lakes separated by a sequence of raised beaches. Isochrones based on precisely determined height and radiometric age determinations of the beaches depict the progressive emergence of the Lowland from the sea over time. Holocene soil development on these beaches is being studied through an analysis of variance of the soil physical, chemical and site characteristics. In places, the progressive accumulation of organic and inorganic sediments within the lakes has led to the formation of ice-cored palsa when the lakes were uplifted and drained. Cores have been obtained using an ice-corer from two palsa in the Lowland and one palsa in the Truelove Valley with a basal date of 6,900 + 115 years B.P. Lacustrine sediment cores have also been obtained using a modified Livingstone piston corer from four large lakes in the Truelove Lowland and one lake on the interior plateau to the east of the Lowland. The record of Holocene paleoenvironmental changes preserved in these sediments is being examined through an investigation of the pollen spectra and sediment geochemistry. It is believed that the soils and former lacustrine sediments contain a record of much of the environmental change that has occurred within the coastal lowlands during the Holocene. (Au)

B, A, C, H
Beaches; Bottom sediments; Coring; Formation; Geochemistry; Lakes; Palaeogeography; Palsas; Palynology; Recent epoch; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology); Soils

G0813
Devon Island, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Paleolimnology of two High Arctic isolation basins, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Young, R.B.
Paper presented at the Geographical Interuniversity Resource Management Seminar, London, Ontario, December 4, 1987.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28734.
Languages: English

The sediment record of two lakes, located in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., and isolated from marine influence by postglacial isostatic uplift is examined. Three cores from Fish Lake (FL1 length 66 cm, FL2 length 61 cm and FL3 length 78 cm) and one core from Phalarope Lake (PL2 length 78 cm) were analysed for geochemical composition by instrument neutron activation analysis on bulk samples and atomic absorption spectrophotometry on chemical extracts, diatom content by optical microscopy and mineralogy by X-ray diffraction analysis. Statistical analysis of the geochemical composition of the cores reveals that several distinct geochemical element combinations define sediment groupings. The delineation of saltwater and freshwater sediments is more precisely assessed by the use of a cluster analysis performed on a data set containing elements from all groups of the periodic table rather than a single element. However, discriminant analyses of groupings developed by cluster analysis suggest that higher amounts of As in sediments is indicative of saltwater sediments while greater amounts of Fe, U, Mo and a higher Fe:Mn ratio are characteristic of brackish water sediments in the lakes. (Au)

B
Bottom sediments; Composition; Diatoms; Geochemistry; Palaeohydrology; Sea level

G0813
Fish Lake, Nunavut; Phalarope Lake, Nunavut; Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Holocene environmental change in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T.   /   Young, R.B.   King, R.H.
Poster paper presented at the Canadian Arctic Islands, Canada's Missing Dimension Conference, Ottawa, November 21-24, 1987.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 28735.
Languages: English

Truelove Lowland, up to an elevation of 86 m ASL, is mantled with a sequence of raised beaches rising to a marine limit dated at 10,295 yr B.P. These deposits are the result of coastal emergence and marine regression, the consequence of postglacial glacio-isostatic rebound. During the first 2,000 years, coastal emergence averaged 2.2 m/100 years, decelerating rapidly. By 6,000 yr B.P. emergence had slowed to a rate of 0.95 m/100 years, and for the last 6,000 years it has averaged 0.24 m/100 years. Soil development and vegetative characteristics reflect the age and composition of the various postglacial deposits. During the coastal emergence, marine lagoons were isolated behind the raised beaches. Today, the larger lakes are freshwater and relatively deep (7.0-8.5 m). Subacustrine sediment cores, with an average length of 60 cm, have been obtained from these lakes using a modified Livingstone corer. These cores have been analyzed for biogenic Si, a proxy for lake productivity; total organic carbon, Cr, and extractable Na and K, as erosional indicators; free Fe and Mn, as a measure of paleoredox conditions; and Br as an indicator of oceanity. In addition, diatoms have been identified and counted. The slow accumulation of inorganic detrital material and the relatively high rates of organic sedimentation in the lakes provides a resolution for the interpretation of paleoenvironmental variations in the order of hundreds of years. Each stage in the ontogeny of the lakes appears to be characterized by a change in the chemistry and biology of the sediments. Current research is also attempting to establish a link between the proxy records of environmental changes provided by the terrestrial palynological record and sublacustrine palynostratigraphies. (Au)

B, A, H
Beaches; Bottom sediments; Composition; Formation; Glacial deposits; Lakes; Palaeogeography; Palynology; Recent epoch; Sedimentation; Sediments (Geology)

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


Sediment chemistry and diatom stratigraphy of two High Arctic isolation lakes, Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T., Canada   /   Young, R.B.   King, R.H.
(Journal of paleolimnology, v. 2, no. 3, Sept. 1989, p. 207-225, ill., maps)
References.
Not seen by ASTIS. Citation from NSTP.
ASTIS record 30193.
Languages: English
Web: doi:10.1007/BF00202047
Libraries: ACU

Three sediment cores from two lakes, Fish Lake and Phalarope Lake, in Truelove Lowland, Devon Island, N.W.T. were analyzed for diatoms and chemical composition. Multivariate statistical techniques using a range of chemical variables successfully isolated three sediment groupings in the cores. Allochthonous and autochthonous chemical components in the sediments have been used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. The two lakes began approximately 10600 years ago as shallow marine lagoons that were isolated from the sea as a result of glacio-isostatic rebound. Based on the presence of distinctive diatom assemblages, the three stratigraphic zones are identified as a basal marine zone, an intermediate and transitional brackish/marine zone and an upper freshwater zone. Following isolation from the sea, the lakes were flushed with freshwater produced by snow and ice melt. In Fish Lake, the period of transition from marine to freshwater, which began approximately 7000 years ago, lasted approximately 800 years. In Phalarope Lake, which was isolated from the sea approximately 5000 years ago, flushing by fresh water was completed only within the last 300 years. Fe, Cr, and Mo in the sediments are associated with the isolation phase when lake sedimentation is sensitive to the presence of brackish water and erosion within the lake catchments. In particular, the precipitation of Mo as MoS2 reflects the presence of hypolimnetic anoxia associated with lake isolation. During the early post-isolation phase the response of lake biota to an influx of nutrients is reflected in an increase in biological silica and organic carbon in the lake sediments. On the other hand, the generally low organic content of the sediments indicates that sedimentation in these lakes has been largely determined by variations in non-biogenic factors through time. During the mid Holocene the progressive stabilization of surface materials within the lake catchments is marked by decreasing Cr, As and Na in the sediments. At the same time, an increase in allochthonous Mn and Fe is attributed to progressive soil development. During the last 2500 years the catchments have experienced decreased erosion resulting in a decrease in both allochthonous clastic input and lake productivity. (Au)

B, J
Bottom sediments; Composition; Coring; Diatoms; Palaeoecology; Stratigraphy; Trace elements

G0813
Truelove Lowland, Nunavut


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