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Introduction to the Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies Program   /   Sutterlin, N.   Snow, N.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. iii-iv
ASTIS record 10774
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The primary objective of the EAMES program was to collect, collate and interpret environmental data in order to prepare Environmental Impact Statements to be submitted to the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. A secondary objective was to provide data to be used in the development of oil spill contingency plans. Within this context, two basic approaches emerge regarding the acquisition of environmental data: (1) survey techniques and (2) process-oriented studies. ... Most of the studies carried out were either comprehensive ship-borne operations or aerial surveys. Work was also undertaken from shore-based camps. Extensive use was made of remote sensing, by radar and satellites. ... The physical studies ... [comprised] three principal disciplines: oceanography, meteorology and geomorphology. ... The biological studies were primarily large-scale surveys, although there were several smaller-scale studies of specific features such as ice edges. The larger-scale studies were designed to document the distribution and abundance of organisms in all trophic levels .... Given the fact that the original reports were far too voluminous for distribution ... the decision was made to ask each of the scientists who contributed to the EAMES program to write up the essence of his or her study(s) as a scientific manuscript and subject it to the peer review system. The papers favourably evaluated would be published together in a single number of Arctic. ... This edition of Arctic contains that series of papers. ... The content of this issue is a reflection of the integrated, multi-disciplinary approach of the EAMES program and will permit the reader to see the ecosystem of the Baffin Bay/Lancaster Sound area as a whole, as well as the sum of its component parts. ...


Trophic relationships at High Arctic ice edges   /   Bradstreet, M.S.W.   Cross, W.E.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 1-12, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8298
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At ice edges in the Canadian High Arctic, seabirds and marine mammals eat arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) and to a lesser extent, zooplankton (calanoid copepods and Parathemisto) and ice-associated amphipods. Cod eat ice-associated amphipods, other ice-associated taxa (harpacticoid and cyclopoid copepods), and zooplankton. Calanoid copepods, Parathemisto, and the ice-associated amphipods studied (Onisimus glacialis, Apherusa glacialis, Gammarus wilkitzkii) all eat primarily diatom algae characteristic of the under-ice flora. From this information, a food web at the ice edge is constructed.


Under-ice biota at the Pond Inlet ice edge and in adjacent fast ice areas during spring   /   Cross, W.E.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 13-27, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8299
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Distributions of nutrients, flora and fauna on the bottom of the ice in Pond Inlet during May-July 1979 were examined with respect to distance from the landfast ice edge, but temporal variability and local spatial variability confounded interpretation. Timing of the ice algal bloom was most delayed under fast ice where snow depth was thickest and was negatively correlated with chlorophyll a content in bottom ice. The bloom occurred first at the ice edge where snow and ice thickness were least and were positively correlated with ice chlorophyll. Standing stocks of ice microalgae at each station were dominated by pennate diatoms, especially Nitzschia grunowii and N. frigida, and were not closely related to distance from the ice edge. High densities of nematodes and harpacticoid and cyclopoid copepodites in the bottom layer of ice were associated with high densities of microalgae, and maximum meiofaunal densities (approx. 50,000 individuals per square m) occurred in masses of algae sloughing off the ice. Macrofaunal communities on the under-ice surface included 9 amphipod and 1 mysid species, and were dominated by Apherusa glacialis, Ischyrocerus anguipes and Onisimus spp. Individuals of these species grew significantly from May to July. Macrofaunal densities were highly variable among both samples and stations, and were not obviously related to distance from the ice edge after allowing for local habitat effects, including influences of ice type (increased densities in rough ice), meltwater (decreased densities) and pan ice (increased densities).


Occurrence, habitat use, and behavior of seabirds, marine mammals, and arctic cod at the Pond Inlet ice edge   /   Bradstreet, M.S.W.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 28-40, ill.
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8300
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In 1979, 17 species of birds were seen during studies near the Pond Inlet ice edge. Northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) thick billed murres (Uria lomvia) and black guillemots (Cepphus grylle) all avoided the ice edge when bordered with heavy pack ice and all but kittiwakes used the ice edge primarily for feeding. Guillemots and fulmars occurred in highest numbers in water along rough and moderately rough landfast ice: murres and kittiwakes showed no preference for such areas or for the other habitat surveyed (smooth landfast ice). Narwhals (Monodon monoceros) white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and ringed seals (Phoca hispida) were the only marine mammals common at the ice edge. Whales repeatedly dived under the edge - probably feeding, searching for open water west of the ice edge, or both. Densities of seals near the ice edge were higher than elsewhere on landfast ice. Divers observed arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) close to the undersurface of landfast ice. Fish offshore were generally smaller, younger, and smaller-at-age than those inshore. Offshore, arctic cod were more numerous in areas with a rough under-ice surface than under smooth ice. Cod concentrated in crevices within rough under-ice surfaces. Inshore, cod were captured from ice cracks over shallow water. I conclude that vertebrates occur at ice edges for one or more of several reasons. Ringed seals and arctic cod live in close association with landfast ice: they probably occur near ice edges simply because landfast ice is present there. Ice edges seem to be primarily barriers against the further movements of whales toward summering locations. Finally, for murres and some other birds, ice edges seem to be favored feeding locations (relative to open sea conditions) due to greater access to preferred foods.


Vertical distribution of zooplankton in eastern Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay, July-October 1978   /   Buchanan, R.A.   Sekerak, A.D.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 41-55, ill.
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8301
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Zooplankton samples (n=150) collected from 23 July to 10 October 1978 at 19 oceanographic stations were analyzed for species composition, abundance, biomass and vertical distribution. Sampling was by closing nets hauled vertically at five depth intervals between 0 and 1900 m. At least 116 species were present in the macro-zooplankton of the study area. Species not previously reported from the area included the copepods Spinocalanus horridus, Chiridiella reducta, Derjuginia tolli, Neoscolecithrix farrani?, Pachyptilus pacificus, Haloptilus longicirrus?, Mormonilla polaris, and Monstrilla longicirrus?. In addition, small numbers of the previously undescribed adult male stages of the copepods Aetideopsis multiserrata and A. rostrata were found. Three copepod species that appear to be new to science were also collected. The high numbers of species, new records for the area, and previously undescribed species or stages collected reflect the relatively intensive sampling, particularly in deep water. In general, the zooplankton was numerically dominated by copepods, particularly the calanoids Calanus glacialis, C. hyperboreus, Pseudocalanus minutus, Metridia longa and Microcalanus spp. and the cyclopoid Oithona similis. Most of these species (exceptions: Metridia langa and Microcalanus spp.) were most abundant in the upper 50 m: total zooplankton numbers were also greatest there. However, one or more stages of each of these copepod species, except P. minutus, were present in depths as great as 1900 m. Factor analysis identified 10 zooplankton assemblages. Of these, two were virtually restricted to the upper 50 m, two were mainly in the upper 50 m but were also found throughout the water column, five were primarily deep water groups (one almost entirely restricted to deep water), and one was primarily an intermediate depth group.


Notes on two deep-water Calanoids (Aetideopsis rostrata and Neoscolecithrix farrani) from Lancaster Sound   /   Shih, C.-T.   Stallard, N.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 56-60, figures
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8302
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Two unusual calanoid copepods were collected in deep-water samples from eastern Lancaster Sound. The hitherto unknown male of Aetideopsis rostrata is described and the first record of Neoscolecithrix farrani from the western North Atlantic is reported.


Marine benthos in the eastern Canadian High Arctic : multivariate analyses of standing crop and community structure   /   Thomson, D.H.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 61-74, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8303
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Standing crop in 204 grab and diver-operated airlift samples taken in Lancaster Sound, Eclipse Sound, and northern and central Baffin Bay at depths of 5-1088 m was highest between 15 and 105 m. Standing crop was highest in Lancaster Sound and least in central Baffin Bay. Three species assemblages derived by factor analysis bore some similarities to communities described by other workers. Depth and location were better predictors of community composition and standing crop than were depth and substrate. The narrow range of grain size found in any one depth range probably accounts for the relative lack of substrate effect on standing crop and community composition. Differences among areas probably related to food availability. High standing crop and communities including filter feeders may be maintained to considerable depths in Lancaster Sound by high current speeds and possible high primary productivity. Currents are weaker and biomass lower in northern Baffin Bay than in Lancaster Sound. The weakest currents were found in Eclipse Sound and central Baffin Bay; deposit feeders and low biomass characterized depths >25 m in both areas.


Young-of-the-year cod (Boreogadus) in Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay   /   Sekerak, A.D.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 75-87, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8304
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Over 85% of all ichthyoplankton found in the study area in 1976 and 1978 were young-of-year (Y-O-Y) Boreogadus. Most of the remainder were seasnails (Cyclopteridae). Densities of Y-O-Y cod were related to season, depth, and (to a lesser degree) year and location. From June to at least mid-August, Y-O-Y cod were normally most abundant at 10-20 m depth and rare or absent at the immediate surface. Densities decreased below ~20 m and no Y-O-Y cod were caught at depths >250 m. After mid-August densities decreased at all depths sampled. More Y-O-Y cod may have been present in the study area in 1976 than in 1978, and Y-O-Y were significantly longer at a given date in 1976 than in 1978.


Spring migration and habitat use by seabirds in eastern Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay   /   McLaren, P.L.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 88-111, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8305
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The status and distribution, during spring and early summer, of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) and black guillemots (Cepphus grylle) were studied during aerial surveys in eastern Lancaster Sound (1976, 1978, 1979) and western Baffin Bay (1978, 1979). Fulmars were present in the study area by early May but most undertook a pre-laying exodus in late May before returning in early June to nest. During June and the first half of July, they were common along coasts and in offshore areas throughout the region. Kittiwakes returned in late May and numbers increased through June, both along coasts and offshore. Numbers offshore decreased after nesting, which begins in mid- to late June. Murres returned to the study area around mid-May and were abundant during June, especially near their colonies. Densities were generally highest along fast ice edges. Guillemots returned to the study area in the last half of May and were widespread along coasts, ice edges and in offshore areas during June. Densities were much lower after nesting, which commences in late June. Densities of fulmars, murres and guillemots were much higher along fast ice edges than along ice-free coasts: the opposite was true of kittiwakes. Offshore, fulmars and kittiwakes preferred waters with little or no pack ice, whereas murres and guillemots preferred moderate to heavy pack ice. These habitat preferences affected the distributions of the species within the region. Ice conditions in eastern Lancaster Sound were markedly different during each of the three years of study. Effects of different ice conditions on the species' distributions are assessed. Seabird distributions in six parts of the region are summarized.


Seabird concentrations in late summer along the coasts of Devon and Ellesmere islands, N.W.T.   /   McLaren, P.L.   Renaud, W.E.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 112-117, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8306
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The presence of large concentrations of northern fulmars and black-legged kittiwakes along coasts of Devon and Ellesmere islands was documented in 1976 and 1978 by aerial surveys. Fulmars were present along these coasts from late July until mid-September, with peaks in late August and early September along Devon Island, and mid-September along Ellesmere Island. Black-legged kittiwakes were abundant along Devon Island after mid-September, but common along Ellesmere Island from late August to late September. Densities of both species were significantly higher in front of glaciers than along coastlines.


The dovekie, Alle alle, as a spring migrant in eastern Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay   /   Renaud, W.E.   McLaren, P.L.   Johnson, S.R.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 118-125, ill.
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8307
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The distribution and numbers of dovekies during spring migration were studied by aerial surveys of eastern Lancaster Sound (1976, 1978, 1979) and western Baffin Bay (1978, 1979). Dovekies that nest in northwest Greenland migrated north through the study area during May. Extrapolations of recorded densities indicate that a peak of ~14 million dovekies may have been present in eastern Lancaster Sound and northwest Baffin Bay in mid-May 1978: fewer were present in May 1979, although the migration was more protracted and total numbers migrating through these areas may have been similar. Dovekies preferred offshore pack ice habitats with moderate to heavy ice cover. Possible reasons for the highly variable distributions in the three years are discussed.


Pelagic feeding ecology of dovekies, Alle alle, in Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay   /   Bradstreet, M.S.W.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 126-140, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8308
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Adult (AD), Subadult (SA), and hatching year (HY) dovekies were collected at sea in 1976, 1978, and 1979 (n=410) for food habits studies. In May and June, AD and SA dovekies ate mostly copepods (99.8% of dry weight in AD, 100% in SA); in August, amphipods became more important (59% in AD, 90% in SA). Adult males accompanied chicks to sea where both groups fed largely on Parathemisto amphipods (99.7% in AD, 97% in chicks). Once abandoned by the adults, HY dovekies ate Parathemisto (59.8% of dry weight), Apherusa glacialis (13.6%), and Onisimus glacialis (5.6%) amphipods; arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) (14.5%); calenoid copepods (5.5%); and other items (1%). Seasonal changes in diet were, in part, related to a presumed seasonal increase of suitable amphipods in surface waters. HY dovekie diets varied geographically and with year. Some food taxa were larger in dovekies collected in waters associated with an intrusive current flowing into and out of the mouth of Lancaster Sound than in those collected in offshore Baffin Bay. In 1978, Parathemisto and Apherusa glacialis were smaller than in 1979 or 1976: HY dovekies apparently compensated by taking more copepods. HY dovekies were smaller on a given date in 1978 but ate similar total amounts of food and grew at similar rates in all three years. The small size of amphipods in 1978 was probably due to unusually late breakup of ice and its probable inhibitory effects on primary and secondary production. In 1978, many non-breeding (AD and SA) dovekies molted in pack ice that persisted until mid-August. In 1979, when pack ice dispersed early, no non-breeding dovekies were collected in August.


Ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea) distribution in late summer and autumn in eastern Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay   /   Renaud, W.E.   McLaren, P.L.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 141-148, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8309
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Ivory gulls in western Baffin Bay and eastern Lancaster Sound were studied in 1976, 1978 and 1979 using aerial surveys. During September and October concentrations of hundreds of ivory gulls occurred along glacier fronts on southeast Ellesmere and northeast and southeast Devon islands, and where offal was available near the settlements of Grise Fiord and Pond Inlet. Dispersal (= southward migration) from coastal to offshore areas proceeded as pan ice cover increased in offshore areas, usually in late September or early October in Lancaster Sound and in mid-October in Baffin Bay east of Baffin Island. Lancaster Sound and northwest Baffin Bay may be a major autumn migration route for ivory gulls that breed in the central and eastern High Arctic and winter in southern Davis Strait and areas to the south.


Waterfowl populations in eastern Lancaster Sound and western Baffin Bay   /   McLaren, P.L.   McLaren, M.A.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 149-157, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8310
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The seasonal distributions of oldsquaws (Clangula hyemalis), common eiders (Somateria mollissima) and king eiders (S. spectabilis) were determined through aerial surveys in eastern Lancaster Sound (1976, 1978 and 1979) and northwest Baffin Bay (1978, 1979). Sightings of geese are summarized in an Appendix. The major spring influx of both eiders occurs about the second week of May but most oldsquaws do not arrive until the first half of June. In spring, all three species are rare in offshore areas, are most abundant along coasts in the northern half of the study area, and tend to depart to nesting areas during the last week of June. Oldsqaws molt along coasts of Lancaster Sound and northwest Baffin Bay, but both species of eiders undertake molt migrations. Three waves of eider out-migration were detected in 1976 and 1978. Distribution and movements within the study area are related to probable migrations routes and ice conditions.


Distribution, movements and abundance of polar bears in Lancaster Sound, Northwest Territories   /   Schweinsburg, R.E.   Lee, L.J.   Latour, P.B.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 159-169, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8311
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Mark-recapture studies show that polar bears are distributed at varying densities throughout Lancaster Sound during winter and spring. Major concentrations occur along the north and south coasts and the transverse floe edge at the mouth of the sound. As the ice melts, some bears move west whereas others move to nearby land areas. There is some evidence that as the ice forms, polar bears return from their summer locations to eastern Lancaster Sound. Polar bears of Lancaster Sound are part of the larger population whose western range extends to Barrow Strait, Prince Regent Inlet, Wellington Channel and Jones Sound. The southern and eastern range limits are unknown although this population may extend at least to Clyde River on northeastern Baffin Island and probably to Greenland. Maternity denning appears to be widespread over the study area probably because of the abundance of suitable habitat. We estimated a population of 1031 236 polar bears in Lancaster Sound during 1979: however, more estimates are needed to determine if this relatively high number is normal for the area.


Coastlines of the eastern Arctic   /   Sempels, J.-M.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 170-179, ill. (some col.), figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8312
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A computer approach was developed and used to analyse the characteristics of coastlines present in the eastern Arctic. Results of this analysis indicate that: 1) almost 75% of all coastlines include a beach; 2) backshores are mostly steep and made up of bedrock; 3) beaches are made up mostly of coarse sediments; 4) the most abundant types of coastal zones consist of steep rocky backshores without beach, and steep rocky backshores with colluvium and continuous boulder beaches; 5) the average slope of backshores and the size of the dominant beach sediment decrease towards the north; 6) fetch has little influence on coastal characteristics; and 7) coastal characteristics are determined primarily by the physiography of the adjacent land and by the nature of backshores.


Major features of the summer near-surface circulation of western Baffin Bay, 1978 and 1979   /   Fissel, D.B.   Lemon, D.D.   Birch, J.R.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 180-200, ill.
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8313
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In the summers of 1978 and 1979, an extensive physical oceanographic program was carried out in western Baffin Bay and Lancaster Sound. Data collected include satellite-tracked drifter measurements, CTD profiles and time series of subsurface currents. They indicate that the near-surface circulation of the area is dominated by the southward-flowing Baffin Current. This current, observed to extend at least as far north as Lady Ann Strait (76 N) and south to Cape Dyer (67 N), is largely confined to within 100 km of the coastline. It varies in both intensity and width with the strongest flows occurring where the current follows a cyclonic intrusion into and out of eastern Lancaster Sound; here in the core of the current the median near-surface (4 to 11 m) speeds are 75 cm/s, decreasing to 50 cm/s at 40 m depth and 25 cm/s at 250 m depth. To the east of Devon, Bylot and Baffin islands, the current is well-defined, but generally less intense with typical near-surface speeds of 30 cm/s. Important spatial variations occurred in the circulation of the area. In eastern Lancaster Sound, two distinct and alternating flow patterns were observed in the strong intrusive current in the summer of 1979. Transient large-scale meanders of the circulation were detected in the offshore portion of the Baffin Current off the east coasts of Bylot and Baffin islands. Between the eastern coastline of Bylot Island and the core of the southeasterly flowing Baffin Current, anticyclonic eddies of approximately 20 km diameter occasionally occurred.


Tidal currents and inertial oscillations in northwestern Baffin Bay   /   Fissel, D.B.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 201-210, figures, tables
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8314
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From moored current meter data obtained in 1978 and 1979 in western Baffin Bay and Lancaster Sound, a preliminary analysis was made of the tidal currents and interial oscillations in the area. The tidal currents are relatively small through much of the study area. Offshore, the largest of both the diurnal and the semi-diurnal tidal currents were in all cases less than 8 cm/s in amplitude. In nearshore locations, the tidal currents can be considerably stronger due to internal tides; for example, off Cape Hay on Bylot Island, the K1 tidal currents near the surface were determined to have an amplitude of 15 cm/s. Evidence of inertial oscillations was present in the records from the uppermost current meters on all moorings located at a nominal depth of 35 m. Typical amplitudes were 10 to 20 cm/s, with speeds as high as 35 cm/s being observed. The magnitude of inertial oscillations decreases rapidly with depth; at 250 m, they are greatly reduced in amplitude and are difficult to resolve from the semi-diurnal tidal currents. The inertial oscillations resulted, in large part, from changes in the local surface wind; at times of solid ice cover, their amplitudes were markedly reduced.


Seasonal variations in currents and water properties in northwestern Baffin Bay, 1978-1979   /   Lemon, D.D.   Fissel, D.B.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 211-218, ill.
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8315
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Year-long records of current speed and direction, temperature and conductivity were obtained from five current meter moorings in northwestern Baffin Bay. Significant seasonal changes in all these parameters were found, which closely followed the seasonal cycle of sea-ice cover. A general winter weakening of the near-surface currents (by a factor of 2 or more) was observed. Deeper currents exhibited a smaller decrease, resulting in a general decrease in baroclinicity during the winter. An exceptional case was observed off the north coast of Bylot Island, where the deep currents reversed. An increase in salinity combined with freezing temperatures was observed in the upper part of the water column during the winter. At some sites this uniform layer appeared to deepen at a steady rate of approximately 40-50 m per month, to a maximum depth between 200 and 250 m. It was not possible, however, to distinguish between the effects of local convection and horizontal advection in deepening the layer.


Iceberg motion in Lancaster Sound and northwest Baffin Bay, summer 1978   /   de Lange Boom, B.R.   MacNeill, M.R.   Buckley, J.R.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 219-233, ill.
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8316
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A radar station on Hope Monument, Devon Island, N.W.T., was operated from 7 July 1978 to 24 September 1978 to track the movement of icebergs in eastern Lancaster Sound and northwestern Baffin Bay. Data were recorded by photographing the radar screen every 20 minutes. Meteorological measurements were also made. The data were processed by computer to provide a statistical picture of the iceberg motions as well as tracks of individual bergs. The mean circulation pattern of the ice was well defined and variations about the mean did not greatly change the general form of the pattern. The dominant feature of the flow was a stream of icebergs moving with a mean speed of about 40 cm/s southward along the east coast of Devon Island from north of Philpots Island to Cape Sherard and then westward to Cape Warrender. At Cape Warrender, the bergs turned toward the centre of Lancaster Sound with directions ranging from southwest to southeast and average speeds up to 50 cm/s. East of the coastal stream in Baffin Bay, the icebergs moved slowly (<25 cm/s) westward to join the coastal stream, while south of the stream at the entrance to Lancaster Sound two large persistent eddies were observed. In Baffin Bay, variations in the flow field appeared to be in response to direct meteorological forcing while in Lancaster Sound no evidence of this response was found. The variations in iceberg motion in the sound appeared to be caused by changes in the currents.


A study of long-term satellite-tracked iceberg drifts in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait   /   Marko, J.R.   Birch, J.R.   Wilson, M.A.
Arctic, v. 35, no. 1, Mar. 1982, p. 234-240, figures
Eastern Arctic Marine Environmental Studies
ASTIS record 8324
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Long-term, satellite-tracked iceberg trajectories were analyzed relative to the larger spatial and temporal scales of iceberg drift in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait. Berg movements were concentrated in the core of the Baffin Current which flows along the continental slope in a primarily southerly direction. The net rate of southward movements was found to be governed by a combination of grounding and landfast ice entrapment which tended to be of particular significance in areas of the coastal shelf adjacent to major submarine canyon systems.


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