Hydrocarbon Impacts = Incidences des hydrocarbures

Key Publications

Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Program working report 1 : report of the first workshop   /   L.G.L. Limited, Environmental Research Associates   Environmental and Social Systems Analysts Ltd.   ESL Environmental Sciences Limited   Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada [Sponsor]   Canada. Environment Canada [Sponsor]   Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans [Sponsor]   Northwest Territories [Sponsor]   Yukon Territory [Sponsor]
[Hull, Quebec : Dept. of Indian and Northern Affairs], 1985.
121 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Appendices.
References.
ASTIS record 51650.
Languages: English
Libraries: ACU XQKNRC

The first workshop of the Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project (MEMP) was held in Yellowknife, NWT from March 26-30, 1985. A total of 57 participants attended this workshop, including representatives from hunters and trappers associations and oil companies, resource managers and scientists from the sponsoring government agencies, and members of several consulting firms. This report summarizes discussions in this workshop of major environmental and social issues associated with oil and gas development in the Mackenzie Delta and Valley. The overall objective of the Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Program is to recommend a monitoring and research program that will: a) address potential impacts; b) be app1icab1e and practica1; and c) be supported with full scientific and technical justification. The program is being conducted using techniques and procedures that were proven successful during the Beaufort Environmental Monitoring Program (INAC and Environment Canada 1984). The Yellowknife workshop was the first of a series of technical meetings and workshops that will be held during the design of research and monitoring programs to accompany hydrocarbon development and transportation activities in the Mackenzie Delta and Valley. The primary purpose of the workshop was to obtain the information necessary to construct conceptual models relating oil and gas development activities and facilities to their potential effects on the environmental resources and resource use in the study area. The conceptual models presented in this report will be used as a framework for the development of a series of discrete impact hypotheses. A systematic evaluation of these impact hypotheses will occur at a second workshop currently scheduled for late fall 1985. The 1985-86 MEMP Final Report produced after this second workshop will include a detailed discussion of each impact hypothesis, and recommendations of workshop participants regarding priority areas of research and monitoring. ... Appendix I provides a summary of past and present development proposals for the study area. Material included in this summary is described in greater detail in other documents. ... (Au)

Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project 1985-1986 final report   /   L.G.L. Limited, Environmental Research Associates   ESL Environmental Sciences Limited   Environmental and Social Systems Analysts Ltd.   P.J. Usher Consulting Services   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]   Canada. Environment Canada [Sponsor]   Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans [Sponsor]   Northwest Territories [Sponsor]   Yukon Territory [Sponsor]
[S.l. : s.n.], 1986.
xxviii, 308, 46, 5, 5 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(NOGAP project no. A.21 : Onshore environmental monitoring and research program)
Appendix A: Hydrocarbon development summary and scenario for a Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Program / R.A. Owens Environmental Services Ltd. in co-operation with LGL Limited - Appendix B: Land subsidence as a result of fluid withdrawal / J.E. McComiskey, Gulf Canada Resources Inc. - Appendix C: List of participants, 1985 Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project Workshop.
References.
BREA Report Type: Research and Monitoring Program Development.
BREA Baseline Data: No.
BREA Biophysical / Valued Components: Yes, 10 mammals, 4 birds, 7 fish, air quality, drinking water quality, landscape quality.
BREA Development Scenarios / Activities: Yes, 21 exploration, construction, operation and support activities evaluated.
BREA Impact Hypotheses: Yes, 25 biophysical and harvest impacts evaluated.
BREA Environmental Concerns Identified: Yes, described in Linkages and Hypothesis.
BREA Harvest Concerns Identified: Yes, described in Linkages and Hypothesis.
BREA Social Concerns Identified: No.
BREA Research / Monitoring Recommendations: Yes.
ASTIS record 20739.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/20739.pdf
Libraries: OORD ACU XQGLW

This report summarizes the results of the first year of MEMP [Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Program]. The overall objective of ... [MEMP] is to recommend a monitoring and research program that will: 1. address significant potential impacts; 2. be based on the best current understanding of industrial development scenarios and ecological processes; 3. have the capability to respond to changing industrial development scenarios and new information regarding ecological processes in the region; 4. be applicable and practical; and 5. be supported with a full scientific and technical justification. This report is the first product of a series of steps aimed at meeting the immediate objective of producing a plan for initiating research and monitoring activities. Most of the report describes possible effects of development uncertainties in regard to our predictive capability, recommended research plans and rationale for the recommended studies. Also included is a description of the methods used throughout the program, ... The Yellowknife workshop was designed to obtain the raw material that would allow for construction of conceptual models of effects of oil and gas development on the people and environmental resources in the study area. These conceptual models form the basis of the impact hypotheses and the research and monitoring recommendations ... The basic approach proceeds through eight tasks: 1. identification of valued ecosystem components (VECs); 2. identification of development activities; 3. identification of the temporal horizon and within-year resolution; 4. identification of the spatial extent and resolution; 5. identification of impact hypotheses that causally relate development activities to VECs; 6. screening of impact hypotheses for validity, relevance and credibility; 7. evaluation of impact hypotheses; and 8. design of research and monitoring programs. Execution of each of these tasks involves modeling, workshops or reporting and was accomplished through ... workshops and technical meetings involving northern residents, government scientists, industry representatives and consultants. For the 25 impact hypotheses that were developed, the conclusions and recommendations are as follows. Hypothesis No. 1: The presence of offshore drilling platforms, construction camps (and associated garbage) and gravel extraction will result in a decrease in the number of arctic and red foxes. VEC: Arctic fox and red fox; Conclusion: a) Gravel extraction - invalid for arctic fox - unlikely for red fox, b) Garbage - possible but of low significance; Recommendation: Garbage treatment and education. Hypothesis No. 2: Increased traffic on the Dempster Highway and roads on the North Slope will decrease the number of caribou and alter their distribution. VEC: Caribou; Conclusion: Likely valid; Recommendations: Studies on traffic and levels and control; distribution of caribou; harvesting information. Hypothesis No. 3: Gravel extraction, construction, seismic exploration and other development activities, and the presence of camps and garbage will decrease the number of grizzly bears and alter their distribution. VEC: Grizzly bear; Conclusion: Valid; Recommendations: Control by mitigative techniques, record grizzly bear kills. Hypothesis No. 4: Oil and gas development activities will alter the water regime and decrease muskrat populations. VEC: Muskrat; Conclusion: Invalid and not worth testing; Recommendations: No specific studies required. Hypothesis No. 5: Oil and gas development construction and clearing activities and the presence of an above-ground pipeline will change the abundance and distribution of moose. VEC; Moose; Conclusion: Unlikely; Recommendations; Monitor browse regeneration, record moose kills. Hypothesis No. 6: Oil and gas exploration and development activities that alter habitat permanently or temporarily will influence the distribution and abundance of marten. VEC: Marten; Conclusion: Unlikely and of low significance; Recommendations; No specific studies required. Hypothesis No. 7: Disturbance associated with hydrocarbon development in or near waterfowl staging, moulting or nesting areas will affect the abundance and distribution of waterfowl. VEC: Waterfowl; Conclusion: Possible but detection difficult due to natural variations; Recommendations: Mitigate possible effects through land use and education. Hypothesis No. 8: Disturbance and habitat alterations due to hydrocarbon development will alter the distribution and/or abundance of raptor species. VEC: Raptors; Conclusion: Likely but of low significance; Recommendations: No specific studies. Hypothesis No. 9: The presence of camps and garbage disposal sites will attract predators that will lead to changes in the local abundance and distribution of waterfowl. VEC: Waterfowl; Conclusion; Valid but of low significance; Recommendations: Proper disposal practices. Hypothesis No. 10: Chronic (episodic) spills of crude oil and diesel fuel near staging and moulting areas of nesting colonies will reduce the abundance of waterfowl. VEC: Waterfowl; Conclusion: Valid under some circumstances, but of low significance; Recommendations: Documentation of mortality of birds resulting from oil spills. Hypothesis No. 11: Land subsidence resulting from hydrocarbon withdrawal will change the abundance and distribution of waterfowl, fish and muskrat. VEC; Waterfowl, fish and muskrat; Conclusion: Unlikely to have significant effects if predictions on subsidence are correct; Recommendations: Methods to predict subsidence are uncertain; studies required on reservoir geology, terrain and permafrost distribution at Niglintgak; monitor ground surface elevations. Hypothesis No. 12: Air emissions resulting from oil and gas development and operations will adversely affect air quality. VEC: Air Quality; Conclusion: Invalid; Recommendations: Compliance with operational permits. Hypothesis No. 13: Increased local disturbance due to activities related to hydrocarbon development will result in decreases in fish quality. VEC: Fish; Conclusion: Invalid; Recommendations: None. Hypothesis No. 14: Improved access and fishing pressure will decrease the abundance of fish and affect their distribution. VEC: Fish; Conclusion: Valid likely to have significant effects; Recommendations: Distribution and population studies; investigate population response to exploitation; monitor harvests. Hypothesis No. 15: Waste discharges and accidental oil/chemical spills will lead to unpotable water and decreased acceptability of fish as a food source. VEC: Potable water and fish quality; Conclusion: a) potable water - unlikely but could have significant local effects, b) fish quality - unlikely but could have significant local effects; Recommendations: a) potable water - monitor results of regional studies, b) fish quality - continue present studies on metals and hydrocarbons in fish. Hypothesis No. 16: The construction and presence of linear corridors will affect the number, distribution and quality of fish, and fishing success. VEC: Fish; Conclusion: Valid and significant for fish numbers and distribution; Valid but insignificant for fish quality and fishing success; Recommendations: Mitigate significant effects through known techniques; site specific information on fish required in most cases. Hypothesis No. 17: Wolverines that are attracted to camps and garbage will be killed as nuisance animals, thus reducing the population. VEC: Wolverine; Conclusion; Unlikely; Recommendations: Mitigate possible effects through line trapping and relocation of nuisance animals. Hypothesis No. 18: Wage employment will change the harvest of white whales. VEC: White whale; Conclusion: Possibly valid in terms of harvest composition; probably invalid in terms of level of harvest; Recommendations: Continue monitoring white whale harvests. Hypothesis No. 19: Vessel traffic will decrease the harvest of white whales. VEC: White whale; Conclusion: Possible but unlikely; Recommendations: Continue current monitoring study. Hypothesis No. 20: Competition by non-locals will change the number of white whales landed and increase mortality in the population. VEC: White whale; Conclusion: Unlikely; Recommendations: None. Hypothesis No. 21: Increased or improved access associated with hydrocarbon development will increase the harvest of waterfowl, which will lead to a reduction in the number and alter the distribution of waterfowl. VEC: Waterfowl; Conclusion: Valid but unlikely; Recommendations: None. Hypothesis No. 22: Increased levels of wage employment will change the total annual harvest of resources by communities in the region. VEC: Mammals, birds and fish; Conclusion: Invalid under present conditions; Recommendations: Information on present wage employment and harvesting practices required to provide baseline information. Hypothesis No. 23: Changes in access will alter the harvest of birds, fish and mammals. VEC: Mammals, birds and fish; Conclusion: Valid for mammals and fish, but unlikely for migratory birds; Recommendations: Document current harvests of mammals and fish. Hypothesis No. 24: Industrial activities in harvesting areas will reduce the harvest of mammals, birds and fish because of conflicts between industry and harvesters over land use. VEC: Mammals, birds and fish; Conclusions: Possible at local level especially for trapping; Recommendations: Obtain harvest and land use information. Hypothesis No. 25: Increases in hunting by non-locals will restrict harvest by local natives. VEC: Birds and fish; Conclusions: Valid under present conditions; Recommendations: Document non-local harvests; document native harvests for selected species; animal population studies. (Au)

Summary of conclusions of the Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project   /   Fee-Yee Consulting Ltd.   DeLancey, D.   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Renewable Resources [Sponsor]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Dept. of Renewable Resources, 1987.
ii, 37 p. : 1 map ; 28 cm.
(NOGAP project no. H.04 : Renewable resources hydrocarbon development impact and planning guidelines)
Cover title.
Appendix.
BREA Report Type: Research and Monitoring Program Development.
BREA Baseline Data: No.
BREA Biophysical / Valued Components: Yes, described in record 20739.
BREA Development Scenarios / Activities: Yes, described in record 20739.
BREA Impact Hypotheses: Yes, 25 biophysical and harvest impacts evaluated.
BREA Environmental Concerns Identified: Yes.
BREA Harvest Concerns Identified: Yes.
BREA Social Concerns Identified: No.
BREA Research / Monitoring Recommendations: Yes.
ASTIS record 29256.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/29256.pdf
Libraries: NWYGI OORD ACU

The Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project (MEMP) addressed a number of environmental issues that are of concern to the residents of the MEMP Region - that is, the Mackenzie Valley from Fort Norman north, the Mackenzie Delta and the Beaufort Peninsula. The organizers of the MEMP project made an effort to include community representatives in the project and to ensure that community concerns were dealt with. However, the final MEMP report is a large, complex and often confusing document. ... In this document we have summarized the results of the MEMP project, and re-organized them for easier reference. The conclusions presented here were arrived at by the MEMP working groups after lengthy discussion. They are not official positions of the Department of Renewable Resources and do not necessarily reflect the research and monitoring priorities of the Department. ... This report presents, in summary form, the 25 hypotheses or possible problems, that were discussed at the workshops. For each problem we have outlined: a statement of the possible problem; background information; reasons why the problem was predicted; conclusion - why the problem is or is not likely to occur; research and monitoring recommended by the workshops; other recommendations. The possible problems have been grouped in three categories. Group A includes those problems which MEMP decided were likely to occur, and likely to have serious impacts (or impacts which could be serious if the problem is not dealt with). Group B includes those problems which MEMP decided were possible, or likely to occur, but were not likely to have serious impacts. Group C includes those problems which MEMP decided were likely to occur, but with very local and minor impacts. Group D includes those problems which MEMP decided were not likely to occur. ... (Au)

Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project - phase II, 1987 activities   /   L.G.L. Limited, Environmental Research Associates   Environmental and Social Systems Analysts Ltd.   Lutra Associates Ltd.   ESL Environmental Sciences Limited   Seakem Oceanography Ltd.   P.J. Usher Consulting Services   Renewable Resources Consulting Services   M. Miles and Associates Limited   Gell, A.   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
Ottawa : Indian Affairs and Northern Development, 1988.
xxxv, 254 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Environmental studies - Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, no. 56)
(NOGAP project no. A.21 : Onshore environmental monitoring and research program)
ISBN 0-662-16577-2
References.
BREA Report Type: Research and Monitoring Program Development.
BREA Baseline Data: No.
BREA Biophysical / Valued Components: Yes, described in record 20739.
BREA Development Scenarios / Activities: Yes, described in record 20739.
BREA Impact Hypotheses: Yes, 25 biophysical and harvest impacts evaluated.
BREA Environmental Concerns Identified: Yes, described in Linkages and Hypothesis.
BREA Harvest Concerns Identified: Yes, described in Linkages and Hypothesis.
BREA Social Concerns Identified: No.
BREA Research / Monitoring Recommendations: Yes.
ASTIS record 35035.
Languages: English
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/misc/35035.pdf
Libraries: ACU OORD

In the Final Report of the Beaufort Sea Environmental Assessment Panel (FEARO 1984), the need for research and monitoring programs to accompany phased oil and gas development in the region was emphasized. In this regard, the Panel commended Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Environment Canada on their initiative in sponsoring the Beaufort Environmental Monitoring Project. In 1985, a comparable program was initiated to determine research and monitoring priorities related to possible effects of hydrocarbon development and transportation in the Mackenzie Delta and Valley regions. This program is referred to as the Mackenzie Environmental Monitoring Project (MEMP), is following procedures similar to those employed in BEMP, and is jointly funded by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Governments of the Northwest Territories and Yukon. MEMP was inactive in 1986. In 1987 it was considered important to review recent relevant research, to comment on the need for revision of MEMP hypotheses and to provide an update of possible future hydrocarbon development plans for the MEMP study area. This report describes 1987 MEMP activities. Sufficient background is provided with the report so that readers, who may be unfamiliar with either BEMP or MEMP, can obtain an overall understanding of the entire program. ... The overall objective of ... [MEMP] is to recommend a monitoring and research program that will: 1. address significant potential impacts; 2. be based on the best current understanding of industrial development scenarios and ecological processes; 3. have the capability to respond to changing industrial development scenarios and new information regarding ecological processes in the region; 4. be applicable and practical; and 5. be supported with a full scientific and technical justification. ... This section briefly reviews current activities of the oil and gas industry in the region and discusses the options and projections for future development of hydrocarbon reserves. It is emphasized from the outset that most of the scenario presented in Owens (1985) remains valid except for the construction timing of specific transport systems. ... Table 3 and accompanying text summarizes recommendations concerning possible revisions of current biophysical hypotheses and possible needs for new biophysical hypotheses. ... Tables 4, 5 and 6 and accompanying text summarize the recommendations concerning possible revisions of current resource harvesting hypotheses and resource harvesting monitoring programs. ... However, the actual task of revising hypotheses or constructing new hypotheses or monitoring programs is not within the scope of this phase of MEMP. (Au)

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