Hydrocarbon Impacts = Incidences des hydrocarbures

Key Publications

Can't live without work. North Slave Metis Alliance environmental, social, economic and cultural concerns : a companion to the Comprehensive Study Report on the Diavik Diamond Project   /   North Slave Metis Alliance
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : North Slave Metis Alliance, 1999.
xviii, 300 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web, and in paper.
First printing, July 1999; Second printing, July 2000 ; Third printing, May 2001.
Appendices.
References as footnotes.
Cover title.
Includes a folded illustration.
ASTIS record 69173.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/North%20Slave%20Metis%20Alliance/061128_NSMA_Submission_withoutwork.pdf
Libraries: ACU

... Introduction: This report articulates and presents the concerns of the North Slave Métis about the environmental, social, cultural, and economic impacts of the Diavik project. If these impacts are known and properly managed, the Diavik mine may create jobs and improve the lives of our people at minimal cost to our community and the land and animals upon which we depend for survival. If the Diavik's impacts are not properly assessed, monitored and mitigated, it has the potential to destroy our lands and resources, our way of life and our people. Chapter Two describes who the North Slave Métis are, and how, as an organized society with inalienable Aboriginal and Treaty rights, we differ from other indigenous peoples of the region. ... Chapter 3.0 undertakes an analysis of recent case law regarding resource development on Aboriginal, Crown and un-surrendered lands. ... The methodology presented in Chapter 4.0 flows directly from the Constitution Act and recent case law regarding natural resource development on Aboriginal, Crown and un-surrendered lands. In this sense, not only is it constitutionally compliant, it enhances the ability of regulators to incorporate Aboriginal Peoples and their knowledge, issues and concerns into environmental and socio-economic impacts assessment. ... Chapter 5.0 articulates and presents the concerns of the North Slave Métis about the environmental, bio-physical and ecological impacts of the Diavik project. Also presented, where information exists, are discussions of the indicators that would tell us that various valued ecosystem components are being impacted by Diavik and diamond mining. Included within this chapter are discussions about the importance of the land and animals to the well-being of the North Slave Métis, as well as a brief indication of the extent of resource use around Lac de Gras by the Métis. ... Concerns of the North Slave Métis about the social, cultural and economic impacts of the Diavik project are articulated and presented in Chapter 6.0. ... Chapter 7.0 presents an extensive list of specific recommendations from the NSMA membership, in their own voice, about how their concerns could be addressed. Specifically, it presents recommendations relevant to properly assessing, monitoring and mitigating environmental, social, cultural and economic impacts on a range of valued ecosystem components.... Chapter 8.0 concludes our Phase One report with nine general recommendations that will enable us to construct a sustainable economy, community and future for our children, while creating certainty for government and industry and ourselves. ... Aboriginal groups, government and industry must find ways to live and work together in a sustainable manner. Can't Live Without Work... is the NSMA's vision for achieving this objective. ... (Au)

Specification of sustainability-based environmental assessment decision criteria and implications for determining "significance" in environmental assessment   /   Gibson, R.B.   Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency [Sponsor]
[Hull, Québec : CEAA, 2001].
iv, 42 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
(Research and development monograph series, 2000)
ISBN 0-662-31068-3
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
References as footnotes.
ASTIS record 69171.
Languages: English
Web: http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/241764/publication.html

Chapter 1: Introduction: Purpose and Background: Sustainability and significance: This research project has an immediate objective that lies within a broad task. The immediate objective is to prepare a foundation for guidelines on how to understand and apply the concept of environmental significance in assessments that adopt sustainability-based decision criteria. This would be easy if we had a well-established understanding of what adopting sustainability-based decision criteria might entail generally for environmental assessment in Canada. Unfortunately, no such understanding exists. ... The role of this report: In response, this report is an initial attempt to clarify the practical implications of adopting "sustainability" as the central decision criterion in environmental assessment in Canada, with special attention to the particular question of how consideration of "significance" may be affected. For the purposes of this work, "environmental assessment" is defined broadly to include processes applying to the preparation and approval of policies, plans and programmes (strategic level assessments) as well as those applying to projects and project-level activities. One of the defining challenges of environmental assessments of undertakings in this broad range has been determining the "significance" of undertakings, options, concerns, uncertainties and effects. This is in part because dealing with the significance problem so often involves addressing the difficult conjunctions of knowledgeable understanding and value-laden choice - the human and the ecological, the systemic and the particular, and the positive and the adverse - that are the most important and perplexing aspects of environmental assessment work. Implications for the significance problem therefore serve well to illustrate how a shift to sustainability-based criteria will affect environmental assessment practice generally. The basic working assumption underlying this research has been that a shift to sustainability-based environmental assessment decision criteria amounts to a fundamental resetting of purposes and priorities. Inevitably, this will affect many aspects of assessment design and implementation. The implications for significance considerations are only part of the story. The immediate purpose here is to build the foundation for a guidance document for considering significance in a working sustainability-based framework for environmental assessment. Much of the initial focus must be on how to construct the framework. The research team for this project has, therefore, attempted to build an understanding from the basics. We have gone back to the roots of the concept of sustainability and we have examined the range of sustainability interpretations and implementations, in Canada and elsewhere, to see what core of agreement there is on the principles, processes and methodologies to be applied. We have surveyed how sustainability objectives have already been integrated into environmental assessment processes in various progressive jurisdictions and we have examined how significance in particular has been addressed. The results of that work are reported in three separate background papers: Background Paper #1- Sustainability Theory, Application and Evaluation, prepared by Graham Whitelaw, Robert Gibson, Selma Hassan, James Tansey, Lorri Krebs and Doris Pokorny; Background Paper #2- The Treatment of Sustainability in the Project-Level Environmental Assessment, Strategic Environmental Assessment and Development Programme Approval Processes of Ten Jurisdictions, prepared by Jenna Watson and Jennifer Agnolin; and Background Paper #3- Significance in Environmental Assessment, prepared by David Lawrence. Drawing from these background documents and other sources, this synthesis paper will outline the key principles and process rules entailed by adoption of sustainability, identify the main implications for application to environmental assessment design, and illus trate this with special attention to the significance problem. The paper concludes with a review of the main problems still to be resolved and, where evident, the most promising possible solutions or route to solutions. This paper is certainly not meant to be the last word even on the general framework for applying sustainability-based criteria in environmental assessment. It was initially prepared as a discussion paper for a workshop with environmental assessment and sustainability experts held at the University of British Columbia in June 2001. The paper was revised substantially after that workshop. Even so, it remains a work in progress. For as we shall see, very little about pursuing sustainability is simple and perhaps nothing is final. ... (Au)

Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy : Mackenzie Valley five-year action plan (2004-2009) : conservation planning for pipeline development   /   Northwest Territories. Protected Areas Strategy Secretariat
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : NWT Protected Areas Strategy Secretariat, 2003.
35 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Report date: October 31, 2003.
Appendices.
ASTIS record 59166.
Languages: English
Web: http://reviewboard.ca/upload/project_document/EA03_007%2FTerms_of_Reference_and_Workplan%2FEA03-007_NWT-PAS%20Mackenzie%20Valley%20Five-Year%20Action%20Plan%202004-2009.pdf

Executive summary: Conserving lands that have ecological and cultural significance for the residents of the Northwest Territories (NWT) is a key policy commitment of both the federal and territorial governments. The Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND) and the Government of the NWT (GNWT) have committed to sustainable natural resource management and development (Federal "North of 60 Action Plan" for Sustainable Development 1997, GNWT Sustainable Development Strategy and Non-Renewable Resource Development Strategy 1999). As well, there are specific policy commitments for the protection of culturally and ecologically significant areas (Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy 1999), and for the provision of increased regulatory certainty to industry interested in the development of the NWT's natural resources (Improving the Northern Operating Environment 2001). With the increasing pace and scale of development in the NWT, it is becoming more challenging to meet the federal and territorial governments' commitments to developing our northern resources in a sustainable manner. In particular, the Mackenzie Valley is under increasing development pressure. The proposed Mackenzie Valley Pipeline is moving closer to becoming a reality and, if approved, will be the largest energy development project in the Northwest Territories and one of the largest in Canadian history. The environmental and regulatory process has begun and a formal application to construct a pipeline is expected in 2004. Completion of this process and pipeline construction is anticipated to be finished within five years. This development presents both major challenges and opportunities for the conservation of ecological and cultural values. To achieve a long-term balance of ecological, cultural and economic values in the Mackenzie Valley, a network of culturally significant and ecologically representative protected areas must be reserved prior to or concurrently with the development of the pipeline. To meet this objective and work within a timeframe that is relevant to communities, Aboriginal and regulatory decision-makers, governments and industry, immediate planning and action must occur. There is a unique, although time-limited opportunity, in the Mackenzie Valley to maintain the ecological integrity and natural connections that still exist. The Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy (NWT-PAS) provides an effective community-based tool for advancing culturally and ecologically significant areas to long-term protected status. The NWT-PAS Five-Year Action Plan (Action Plan) describes the strategic enhancement needed over the next five years to identify, review, establish interim protection and evaluate a network of protected areas in the Mackenzie Valley. The Action Plan focuses resources to meet the timeline of the proposed Mackenzie Valley Pipeline and provides increased capacity to the communities within the Mackenzie Valley to help meet their long-term conservation goals such as those identified in community conservation plans, land use plans, interim measures and land claims. This Action Plan is part of the general implementation of the NWT-PAS. The Action Plan conforms to the overall vision, goals and principles of the NWT-PAS, and respects the precedence of Aboriginal and Treaty land claims and rights. Advancement of sites under this Action Plan will follow the eight steps set out in the NWT-PAS which details an extensive planning process for protected areas establishment. As annual resources permit, general implementation of the NWT-PAS will continue throughout the NWT. Anticipating the number of sites that will be advanced in the next five years in the Mackenzie Valley is challenging, as the planning process is dependent on capacity and the conservation goals of the communities. For the purposes of the Action Plan, an estimate of sixteen (16) sites is being used. This estimate is based on the number of ecoregions that are directly impacted by the anticipated pipeline route and associated hydrocarbon development areas in the Mackenzie Valley (Map #1). Key objectives of the Action Plan: -Enhance Protected Areas Planning in the Mackenzie Valley by mapping ecologically representative areas, completing non-renewable resource potential mapping, and achieving cooperative implementation of the NWT-PAS at a regional level. Anticipated completion of this objective is March 2005. -Building Capacity to ensure that community and regional organizations have the ability to participate, including promoting and supporting candidate protected areas, and ensuring the NWT-PAS Secretariat is able to provide appropriate technical and administrative coordination. This objective will be ongoing, beginning in April 2005. -Ensuring Candidate Area Information Requirements are met for advancing sites. This objective will be ongoing as candidate areas are assessed through the NWT-PAS.-Increasing Communications with communities, stakeholders, government, industry and the scientific community on the goals of the NWT-PAS. This objective must be initiated in 2004-2005, but will be ongoing. The estimated total cost to the NWT-PAS for establishing protected areas in the Mackenzie Valley over the next five years is roughly $17.8 million (see Table 1). The majority of the anticipated costs are related to the technical requirements to carry out coordination, research and analysis for advancing candidate areas. A significant percentage of these costs are also related to building capacity to carry out the Action Plan at the community, regional and territorial level. The estimated cost for enhancing the NWT-PAS in 2004-05 is $940,000. From 2005 to 2009 the annual estimated cost for enhancing the NWT-PAS is $4,163,750. Based on these estimates, a cost-sharing arrangement will be determined by the NWT-PAS stakeholders (federal and territorial government, Aboriginal organizations, non-governmental organizations, and indus try). (Au)

Contaminant behaviour and impact in permafrost soils : a review of processes and potential impacts   /   Biggar, K.W.
[N.W.T.] : Environment Canada, Northern Division [distributor], 2004.
16 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
References.
Cover title.
Submitted to Environment Canada, Northern Division.
Report date: 31 March 2004.
ASTIS record 59101.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Environment%20Canada/060303_Attachment_3_to_EC_Cover_Letter_to_JRP.pdf

The intent of this portion of the report is to describe how salt and petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminants may behave in permafrost soils. Understanding of this behaviour can then lead to understanding of how old contaminated sites may behave with respect to contaminant release and transport. It may also lead to better understanding of how future contaminant management can be best implemented to minimize adverse environmental impact. The discussion will cover the following topics: -Permafrost growth and degradation due to: changes in soil thermal properties, changes in heat transfer with the atmosphere, and presence of water on the surface. -Potential impact of localized thawed zones (taliks); -Freeze, thaw, and water movement in the active layer; -Salts in frozen soils: impact on unfrozen water in frozen soils, freezing point depression, solute exclusion during freezing, and diffusive transport. -Petroleum hydrocarbons in frozen soils: free phase movement through frozen soil, potential transport away from drilling sumps, dissolution into unfrozen water, and potential impact on unfrozen water in frozen soils. Given the above understanding, a potential methodology will then be proposed to evaluate contaminated sites. This may be used to determine the extent of impact, to assist in the determination of required remedial activities, and to prioritize sites for remedial action. ... (Au)

Ecology of boreal woodland caribou in the lower Mackenzie Valley, NT : work completed in the Inuvik region, April 2003 to November 2004   /   Nagy, J.A.   Auriat, D.   Wright, W.   Slack, T.   Ellsworth, I.   Kienzler, M.   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development [Sponsor]   Species at Risk Habitat Stewardship Program (Canada) [Sponsor]   Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board [Sponsor]   Yukon Territory. Yukon Environment [Sponsor]
[Inuvik, N.W.T. : RWED, 2004].
vi, 54 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59121.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Government%20of%20the%20Northwest%20Territories/Rpt1_interim_bwc_report.pdf

Introduction: Until recently, little scientific knowledge was available for boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) that occur along the Mackenzie River Valley from the NWT/Alberta border in the South Slave Region to the Mackenzie Delta in the Inuvik Region. Unlike barren-ground (R. t. groenlandicus), Peary (R. t. pearyi), and mountain woodland caribou (R. t. caribou), these caribou had not been the focus of biological studies in the NWT. Threats to boreal woodland caribou habitat include oil and gas exploration and development, the potential for road and hydro development, increased tourism and other non-consumptive human activity, forest fire, and climate change. The degree of impact of these past human disturbances and wildfires on boreal woodland caribou in the NWT is not known, although where these woodland caribou occur elsewhere across Canada the cumulative effects of human activities and natural habitat disturbances have been shown to be negative to the point of caribou extirpation in many areas, including entire provinces (e.g., Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). At present, much of the boreal woodland caribou range in the Inuvik Region has been altered by past seismic work, wildfires, and road access (Figure 1). The Inuvik Region, particularly the Mackenzie Delta area, is currently experiencing a significant increase in oil and gas exploration and extraction activities. A pipeline along the Mackenzie River valley has been proposed to deliver natural gas to the south. These activities may have an impact on boreal woodland caribou and their habitats in the Inuvik Region. Linear disturbances such as seismic lines, roads, and cutlines, have been shown to significantly impact wildlife populations throughout the world. Many wildlife species have been documented to avoid habitats with high densities of linear disturbances (McLellan and Shackleton 1988). Renewed oil and gas development in the north will cause higher densities of linear disturbance, resulting mainly from seismic activity. Over 37,000 km of seismic lines were cut in the Mackenzie River delta from 1960 to 1990 (National Energy Board Records). Recent exploration activities in this area may increase line densities to over 2 km per square kilometer in some areas. The impacts of linear disturbance on wildlife in a northern environment have been poorly studied, however it is clear that permafrost terrain is easily degraded (Lambert 1972; Mackay 1970; Nicholas and Hinkel 1996; Zoltai and Pettapiece 1973) and vegetation is slow to recover (Billings 1987; Harper and Kershaw 1996). This suggests that: 1) disturbance is more likely to alter wildlife habitat in the north; and 2) any alteration of wildlife habitat will persist for a longer period of time. Climate change models for the Mackenzie River Valley predict an increase in wildfire frequency and severity (Kadonga 1997), increased snowfall across the region, the incursion of new species including forest pests (Sieben et al. 1997) and parasites (Kutz 1999), and significant changes in forest composition (Hartley and Marshall 1997). All of these could impact boreal woodland caribou, although the potential extent is unknown. In response to these changes, the Department of Resources Wildlife and Economic Development in partnership with the Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board began collecting baseline information on boreal woodland caribou in the Inuvik Region. Traditional knowledge of woodland caribou in these regions was documented during winter 2001/2002. In fall 2001 a project was initiated to collect baseline scientific information on boreal woodland caribou in the Lower Mackenzie River area (Inuvik Region). The primary objectives of this study are as follows: - obtain estimates of the number of boreal woodland caribou in the core study area - obtain estimates of productivity, recruitment, and survival (calf and adult female) rates - obtain estimates of home range size and seasonal movements rates - determine seasonal patterns of habitat use and selection including use of areas burned by wildfires and use of areas in relation to linear anthropogenic features such as seismic lines - map the relative probability of occurrence of boreal woodland caribou across the Inuvik Region using caribou use (satellite tracking) data and existing Landsat TM based vegetation maps - identify seasonal habitats that may be limiting for boreal woodland caribou in the Inuvik Region. This report summarizes work done in the Inuvik Region between April 2003 and November 2004. ... (Au)

Summary of evidence of Dene Tha' First Nation re: hearing order GH-1-2004 [Mackenzie Gas Project]   /   Dene Tha' First Nation
[Alberta : Dene Tha' First Nation, 2004].
[11] p. : 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
ASTIS record 59240.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367520

... Evidence of Shakir Alwarid. 1. Pursuant to Hearing Order GH-1-2004 ("the Hearing Order") regarding various applications to the National Energy Board ("NEB") for the Mackenzie Gas Project ("the Project"), the Intervenor, Dene Tha' First Nation ("Dene Tha'" ), will make submissions at the oral hearing concerning: (a) Issue 7 at Appendix 1 to the Hearing Order, namely, the terms and conditions to be included in any approval the NEB may issue; and (b) Issue 8 at Appendix 1 to the Hearing Order, namely, the appropriateness of the Applicant's Public Consultation Program and the adequacy of aboriginal consultation. Issue 7: Position of the Dene Tha'. 2. Dene Tha' takes the position that there are certain issues that must be addressed with respect to the enforceability of any terms and conditions which the NEB may place on any approval it may grant in respect of the application for the Project. 3. The position of Dene Tha', which has previously been communicated to the NEB, is that ... as the Project has been defined in both the Terms of Reference for preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Project as well as in the Joint Review Panel Agreement, it is not clear whether any terms and conditions that the NEB may attach to the Project (as defined in the TOR and Joint Review Panel Agreement) will be enforceable in Alberta. Issue 8: Position of the Dene Tha': 4. It is the position of Dene Tha' that the Applicant has failed to adequately consult with Dene Tha' in respect of the potential for the Project to infringe the Aboriginal and Treaty rights of Dene Tha' throughout the Traditional Territory of Dene Tha' in the Northwest Territories and Alberta, as shown in the map attached to this outline of Mr. Alwarid's evidence. 5. It is also the position of the Dene Tha' that the Applicant has failed to properly comply with the NEB's Memorandum of Guidance Concerning Consultation with Aboriginal Peoples, dated March 4, 2002. Finally, it is the position of the Dene Tha' that the federal Crown has also failed to properly consult with Dene Tha' in respect of the potential for the Project to infringe on Dene Tha' Aboriginal and Treaty rights throughout Dene Tha's Traditional Territory. ... (Au)

Intervention of the Government of the Yukon [to the National Energy Board Mackenzie Gas Project environmental review]   /   Yukon Territory. Dept. of Energy, Mines and Resources
[Whitehorse, Yukon: Dept. of Energy, Mines and Resources, 2004].
[4] p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title: National Energy Board.
ASTIS record 59241.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/343148

... 1. The Government of Yukon, as represented by the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources ("Yukon"), and its authorized representatives intends to appear at the public hearing as an intervener and hereby makes application for intervener status for this purpose. 2. Yukon's interest in this proceeding principally concerns the economic consequences which the Mackenzie Gas Project may facilitate in support of the exploration and development of natural gas in the Yukon Territory and other northern regions. Equally important are matters of public policy that arise in respect of impacts the Mackenzie Gas Project will have upon First Nation and other local communities. 3. Yukon is also interested in the issues raised by a request in the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline application for an order of the Board pursuant to Part IV of the NEB Act, approving the toll and tariff principles that are to apply to service offered by the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. 4. Yukon seeks, specifically, to ensure that the principles determined by the Board take into account matters concerning future expansion(s) or extension(s) in a manner consistent with basin opening pipelines regulated by the Board. This includes matters relating to toll design principles as well as methodology. Further, Yukon is interested in ensuring that such principles determined by the Board take into account matters related to open access and the means by which existing and available capacity may be offered to future shippers in a just, reasonable and non-discriminatory manner. These issues will be of fundamental importance to Yukon in creating certainty for both present and future exploration and development of natural gas resources in the Yukon Territory. 5. Yukon is also interested in issues and principles concerning economic access, future expansion as they relate to the application for the Mackenzie Gathering System and any approval or conditions of any approval issued under paragraph 5(1) (b) of the COGO Act. ... 8. Yukonbelieves that it is appropriate to amend Issue 5 to include broader consideration of the toll and tariff principles that concern access to and expansions or extensions of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeine. Yukon also believes that an amendment should allow for the consideration of economic access to and explansions or extensions of the Mackenzie gathering System. In replacement of Issue 5, Yukon proposed, therefore, the following two amendments to accommodate these matters: The consideration of toll and tariff regulation in respect of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline including toll and tariff principles applicable to the provision of service, access, expansions or extensions of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. The consideration of economic access to the Mackenzie Gathering System including principles, applicable to the provision of service, access, expansions or extensions of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. The consideration of economic access to the Mackenzie Gathering System including principles applicable to the provision of service, access, expansions or extensions of the Mackenzie Gathering System. 9. Paragraph 14 of the Board's Hearing Order GH-1-2004 raises the concept of technical conferences. Yukon endorses this concept, noting that it intends to appear and participate where the subject-matter is of relevance to Yukon's concerns and issues. ... (Au)

A peak into the future : potential landscape impacts of gas development in northern Canada   /   Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development   Holroyd, P.   Retzer, H.   Canadian Arctic Resources Committee [Sponsor]   Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. Yukon Chapter [Sponsor]   Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. Northwest Territories Chapter [Sponsor]
Drayton Valley, Alberta : The Pembina Institute, 2005.
38 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
ISBN 0-921719-77-9
Appendix A: Study area data sources and maps.
Indexed a PDF file available on the Web.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 56573.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.carc.org/2005/APeakintotheFutureReportJune72005.pdf
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/O%20Reilly%20-%20Kevin%20-%20citizen/OReilly%20Letter%20dated%2029%20June%202005%20to%20JRP%20re%20Materials%20for%20the%20Public%20Registry%20-%20Attach%20-%20A_Peak_into_the_Future_June-7-05.pdf
Web: http://www.cpawsyukon.org/resources/peak-future-report.pdf
Libraries: ACU

... Renewed interest in developing the oil and gas resources of northern Canada presents peoples of the North with economic opportunities as well as significant social and environmental risks. With large-scale development proposals submitted and pending, it is imperative that Northerners have access to quality information and develop a sound understanding of the oil and gas industry in order to make informed decisions about the potential environmental impact of these developments. ... Northerners have been provided with little information that illustrates potential scenarios for oil and gas development over a 30- to 50-year time period. Similarly, information about the potential cumulative, long-term ecological, economic, and social impacts of full-scale natural gas exploration and development is limited. The emphasis to date has been on individual gas projects (e.g., a seismic project, an exploration drilling project, the Mackenzie Gas Project). Such projects represent only one stage of a much larger development process. This project is intended to provide Northerners with an estimate of the extent and pace of gas field development that could occur if known and potential reserves of gas hydrocarbons are developed. A series of GIS maps of current and forecast gas developments in the three study areas have been included in Appendix A. This will provide Northerners with a visual tool to help them evaluate the density of seismic lines, wells, roads, pipelines, gas plants, compressor stations, and gas transmission lines on the land. The maps could be used in land use planning and to raise community awareness about the potential impacts of oil and gas development. This technical document will be complemented by a public report that includes a qualitative discussion of the environmental impacts associated with gas development. ... Based on current oil and gas reserve estimates and development proposals, this study aims to provide Northern communities with a 'picture' ofpotential cumulative gas development in three regions of the North. This information is intended to serve as a useful tool for communicating the scope and scale of potential gas development to Northerners. ... The study models the general pattern of gas field development over the next 30 years based upon proven and potential reserves and development plans for the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories (onshore only), the Colville Hills, Northwest Territories (Sahtu region), the Peel Plateau, Yukon Territory. The study does not identify the exact location of well sites or pipelines, but rather gives a representation of the overall density (e.g., percent of land under development). ... The Mackenzie Delta is located where the Mackenzie River empties into the Beaufort Sea. The study area for the delta includes the anchor fields as identified in the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) application as well as the remaining areas of the delta that have known gas reserves. Offshore areas were excluded from the analysis, yet contain almost twice as many reserves as do onshore areas. Colville Hills is located northeast of Norman Wells. The study area for Colville was drawn to include the Significant Discovery Licenses in Colville and the lands between each, for a total of approximately two million hectares to correspond with the area of reserves in the GLJ Report. The Peel Plateau is located in northeastern Yukon, bordered to the north by the Mackenzie Mountains and to the east by the Richardson Mountains. For study purposes, GIS maps were used to divide the Peel Plateau into the Peel Plain and Disturbed Belt given that there are significantly different potential reserves in each area that could result in different concentrations of development. ... Conclusions: This model demonstrates a rapid rate of gas development and a large linear and surface area footprint of development in the North. The findings suggest that Northerners can expect industrial development to increase significa ntly over a period of 10 to 20 years and then, unless more reserves are found, decline . The model shows that the rate of development and ultimate footprint will be similar to other mature gas fields in Western Canada's Sedimentary Basin that are now fully developed and that have left a significant surface disturbance on the landscape. This study has shown that the use of currently available best practices can reduce the footprint of development considerably, although the impact of gas development can never be entirely eliminated. The best available practices should be continuously employed and improved to reduce the ecological impacts of development. The modeling approach used in this study could be a tool used by regulators and companies to evaluate the effects of different and improved exploration, development and operational practices. ... Recommendations: In many areas of the North there is still the opportunity to choose where natural gas development can occur and which areas will be free of industrial development. Given the potential for rapid rate of development, there is strong reason to set aside conservation lands before natural gas development begins. Natural gas development can have a very large impact on the environment. Development, which consists of activity and infrastructure, can cause environmental disturbances to land, soil, water, wildlife, and vegetation. ... With a full picture of cumulative development, and an understanding of cumulative impacts associated with development, Northerners will be able to assess trade-offs and risks, and attempt to balance current objectives and related decisions that will affect Northern ecosystems and communities into the future. (Au)

Cumulative effects modelling of the Mackenzie Gas Project - scoping and development   /   Cizek Environmental Services   Cizek, P.   Canadian Arctic Resources Committee   Montgomery, S.   Canadian Arctic Resources Committee [Sponsor]
Ottawa : CARC, 2005.
27 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed a PDF file available on the Web.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 56574.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.carc.org/2005/MGP%20Development%20and%20Cumulative%20Effects%20Mapping%20(CARC,%20Jan.%2010%202005).pdf
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Canadian%20Arctic%20Resources%20Committee/MGP_Development_and_Cumulative_Effects_Mapping-CARC-Jan-2-05.pdf

... It was originally anticipated that mapping and modelling cumulative effects of induced natural gas fields would require a probabilistic approach where future gas wells would be identified based on a combination of geological potential and distance to proposed pipeline infrastructure. On October 7, 2004 the regulatory applications for the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) were submitted and released to the public. While the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) submitted to the Joint Review Panel does not contain any maps showing cumulative effects of induced development, the application to the National Energy Board contains a very detailed natural gas supply forecast prepared by Gilbert, Laustsen, Jung Associates Ltd., Petroleum Consultants, entitled Mackenzie Gas Project - Gas Resource Supply Study (GLJ Study). The GLJ Study identifies all the future wells required to supply the MGP until 2049 but does not provide any maps. Instead of pursuing a probabilistic dynamic modelling approach, it was decided to simply map out the induced development identified by the GLJ Study. In addition, a preliminary cumulative effects assessment was conducted using the United Nations Environment Program's "Global Methodology for Mapping Human Impacts on the Biosphere" (GLOBIO). ... Study area: The GLJ Study (Table 7, p. 50) identifies three general petroleum areas that could supply the MGP: 1. Mackenzie Delta & Beaufort Sea (NWT), 2. Eagle Plains (Yukon Territory), 3. Colville Hills (NWT). However, the GLJ Study (p. 56) states that the Eagle Plains are approximately 300 km from the planned pipeline route and would be uneconomical to tie-in on a stand-alone basis. As a result, the GLJ Study only considers the Mackenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea and the Colville Hills petroleum areas as economic gas supplies for the MGP. ... The study area is approximately 625 km x 680 km or 425,000 km². ... The GLJ Study identifies five gas supply scenarios: 1. Contingent Onshore Resources at 1.2 billion cubic feet per day or 34 million m³ per day (Figure 31, p. 55). 2. Contingent and Prospective Onshore Resources at 1.2 billion cubic feet per day or 34 million m³ per day (Figure 32, p. 63). 3. Contingent and Prospective Onshore and Offshore Resources at 1.2 billion cubic feet per day or 34 million m³ per day (Figure 33, p. 63). 4. Contingent and Prospective Onshore and Offshore Resources with Increased Pipeline Capacity at 1.8 billion cubic feet per day or 51 million m³ per day (Figure 34, p. 65). 5. Contingent and Prospective Onshore and Offshore Resources with NEB P50 Resource Estimates at 1.2 billion cubic feet per day or 34 million m³ per day (Figure 35, p. 65). This study mapped out Scenario #4, which is the maximum production scenario. ... Table #1 summarizes the estimated cumulative number of wells, linear kilometres of seismic, and length of pipelines using the “Contingent and Prospective Onshore and Offshore Resources at 1.8 billion cubic feet per day or 51 million m³ per day” scenario as presented in the GLJ Study. The GLJ Study does not describe the associated infrastructure (e.g. compressor stations, roads, borrow sites etc.) and it is beyond the scope of this project to develop an estimate. It is likely that the exploratory drilling and seismic activities would be phased over the course of several years. To simplify the modelling, each year in Table #1 and each of the subsequent maps represents a “snapshot” of the cumulative hydrocarbon activities that would have been carried out up to that particular year . ... [Scenarios were presented for the Proposed Mackenzie Gas Project - 2009, Induced Development - 2011, Induced Development - 2013, Induced Development - 2016, Terminal Development - 2027]. ... Conclusions and recommendations: The GLJ Study provides a straightforward basis for mapping the induced development and cumulative effects of the MGP without the need for probabilistic dynamic modelling. Mapping the results of the GLJ Study vividly illustrate s the actual implications of the MGP until 2027 with regard to future wells, feeder pipelines, and seismic activity. However, an estimate of the infrastructure associated with induced development such as access roads, compressor stations, and borrow sites is beyond the scope of this study. The main limitations of this approach are: 1. It assumes that the forecasts and assumptions in the GLJ Study are correct. 2. The random point and line generator software distributes wells and seismic lines randomly throughout each petroleum area without regard for more detailed geology or petroleum potential. 3. The automated script connects the new wells through feeder pipes based on the order in which the wells appear in the database, which may not necessarily be the order in which they would be drilled. 4. The feeder pipes generated by the automated script are straight and do not account for topographic constraints unless manually edited. 5. The best available estimate for future seismic activity involved calculating ratios of existing wells to historical seismic lines. These ratios may become reduced as petroleum exploration areas mature. 6. According to standard cartographic convention, the symbols for the hydrocarbon activities are sufficiently large to be easily legible on the small-scale maps. This exaggerates their actual physical footprint. It is noteworthy that the EIS for the MGP does not apply any “zones of influence” to its cumulative effects assessment. The GLOBIO methodology of predicting ecological effects from human activities was applied to the terminal development at 2027 (only in onshore areas and only in the terrestrial environment) to present the potential for cumulative effects from the Project. Further study is suggested to include all possible infrastructure in the maps and modelling (e.g., access roads, borrow pits, gathering systems, compressor stations), better mapping of potential development within the producing areas, and more precise zones of inf luence on the Mackenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea terrestrial/aquatic/marine ecosystems. Care will have to be taken to identify an appropriate Regional Study Area to address the "Modifiable Area Unit Problem" in order to meaningfully calculate how much of a given study area is impacted. It should be noted that the "Regional Study Area" defined in the EIS does not encompass all of the petroleum exploration areas where the GLJ Study states that induced development will take place. ... (Au)

A choice of futures : cumulative impact scenarios of the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Cizek Environmental Services   Cizek, P.   Canadian Arctic Resources Committee [Sponsor]
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : CARC, 2005.
45 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from the Web.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 58191.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.carc.org/pubs/carc%20cumulative%20effects%20presentation%20to%20JRP%20.pdf

Introduction: On January 5, 2005, Cizek Environmental Services completed an initial cumulative effects mapping project of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) for the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee (CARC). ... On May 1, 2005, the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee contracted Cizek Environmental Services to conduct further cumulative effects mapping of the Mackenzie Gas Project according to the following tasks: 1) Review and critique revised MGP cumulative footprint expected to be submitted by Imperial Oil on March 31, 2005. 2) Obtain GIS data in new submission from Imperial Oil; convert and import into compatible GIS format. 3) Develop more detailed spatial models for seismic, roads, and feeder pipelines; Consider petroleum fields not contained in Gilbert, Laustsen, Jung study. 4) Develop and map alternative scenarios with minimal impact seismic, helicopter supported drilling, multi-well pad directional drilling. 5) Develop maps and 3D visualizations of “business as usual” and “best practices” scenarios. On June 1, 2005, the Mackenzie Explorer Group (MEG), representing seven companies that have petroleum interests in the NWT who wish to ship gas through the MGP, submitted a study by Sproule Ltd., Geological and Petroleum Engineering Consultants, entitled Natural Gas Resource Assessments and Deliverability Forecasts, Beaufort-Mackenzie and Selected Northern Canadian Basins to the National Energy Board .... This project incorporates new data from the Sproule Study. ... This project reached the following conclusions: 1) The extent of human disturbance in the form of number of new producing fields, exploration wells required to find resource, linear km of new seismic, linear km of winter road, linear km of new pipelines is positively related to pipeline capacity and tends to increase exponentially in the 4.0 BCFD scenario. Simply put, reducing pipeline capacity reduces cumulative impacts. 2) Total linear corridor density (roads, pipelines, and seismic cut-lines) exceeds the extirpation threshold for woodland caribou (3.0 linear km/km²) in the Mackenzie Delta (onshore) both above and below the tree-line in all scenarios. Existing seismic cut-lines may have already reached the cautionary threshold for woodland caribou (1.0 linear km/km²). 3) Total linear corridor density reaches the cautionary threshold for woodland caribou (1.0 linear km/km²) in the Colville Hills only under the 4.0 BCFD scenario. 4) In the 4.0 BCFD scenario, total linear corridor density exceeds the extirpation threshold (3.0 linear km/km²) for woodland caribou in the Bonnet Plume Basin, Old Crow, and the Kandik Basin, total corridor density exceeds the critical threshold (1.8 linear km/km²) in the Eagle Plain, total corridor density exceeds the cautionary threshold (1.0 linear km/km²) in the Peel Plain, and total corridor density is below the cautionary threshold (1.0 linear km/km²) in the Mackenzie Valley. 5) Total open road density (all-weather roads, winter roads, and pipelines) does not reach the critical threshold for grizzly bear (0.6 linear km/km²) under any scenario. Under the 4.0 BCFD scenario, total open road density reaches less than one-third of the critical threshold for grizzly bear in the Colville Hills, Mackenzie Valley, Eagle Plain, and Peel Plain and reaches about one-half of the critical threshold for grizzly bear in the Mackenzie Delta, Bonnet Plume Basin, Old Crow, and Kandik Basin. 6) Conventional seismic cut-lines can be reduced through the use of minimal impact seismic techniques combined with under-canopy Global Positioning Systems (GPS). It is technically and economically feasible to reduce winter roads to exploration wells through the use of helicopter-supported drilling. 7) In order to achieve a total corridor density of less than 1.0 linear km/km², all new seismic lines in the Mackenzie Delta may have to be converted to minimal impact seismic lines under all scenarios. In the Colville Hills and Mackenzie Valley, no seismic lines have to be converted to minimal impact seismic lines under the 4.0 BCFD scenario. In the Eagle Plain, Bonnet Plume Basin, Old Crow, and Kandik Basin well over half the seismic lines have to be converted to minimal impact seismic lines under the 4.0 BCFD scenario. 8) By eliminating conventional seismic in the Mackenzie Delta and converting 90% of the remaining seismic lines to minimal impact seismic lines, the linear km of onshore conventional seismic can be reduced from 492,500 km to 23,962 km under the 4.0 BCFD scenario. 9) By accessing 90% of the exploration wells with helicopter instead of winter roads, new winter roads can be reduced from 26,820 km to 7,175 km under the 4.0 BCFD scenario. 10) Under the reduced impact scenario at 4.0 BCFD, there is substantial overlap between petroleum extraction and documented ecologically and culturally sensitive areas. In order to preserve these ecological and cultural values, it may be necessary to further reduce or prevent petroleum extraction in these and any other sensitive ecological and cultural areas. 11) Under the reduced impact scenario at 4.0 BCFD, there is substantial overlap between petroleum extraction and potential protected areas. In order to retain these areas in a pristine state as ecological and cultural benchmarks, it may be necessary to prevent petroleum extraction in these and any other potential protected areas. ... (Au)

Transport Canada's submission to the Joint Review Panel for the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Canada. Transport Canada
[Winnipeg, Man.] : Tansport Canada, 2005.
i, 13 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: December 13, 2005.
Contains a cover letter dated January 17, 2006, from Dave Murray, Regional Director General - Prairie and Northern Region of Transport Canada to Robert Hornal, Chair of the Joint Review Panel.
ASTIS record 58524.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Transport%20Canada/060117_TC_submission.pdf

... Transport Canada (TC) has evaluated the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), supplemental information and responses to Information Requests (IRs), all of which were provided by the proponent before November 18, 2005. TC's submission to the Joint Review Panel (JRP) on the proposed MGP results from a review of this information and, as such, TC may choose to modify the present submission based on new information or analysis provided by the proponent from that point forward. TC is responsible for transportation policies and programs and seeks to promote an integrated transportation system that is safe, secure, efficient, sustainable and environmentally responsible. ... The department also has a responsibility to regulate the project's associated transportation infrastructure, equipment and personnel in accordance with all applicable legislation and regulations within TC's mandate (e.g. Aeronautics Act, Railway Safety Act, Canada Shipping Act, Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA), and the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act). ... The purpose of this section is to identify and review key issues in the Environmental Assessment phase of the MGP associated with the protection of the public right to navigation and the protection of the environment as administered by TC under the NWPA; and to make recommendations to the JRP to address those issues. ... Volume 1, Section 1.6.6 describes the permit applications that will be required in order for the project to proceed. However, this section omits the identification of TC as the regulatory agency that may be required to issue Approvals under the NWPA and/or the National Energy Board Act (sections 108 and 109). Volume 2, Section 3.2.5.1 and Supplemental Information, Part A, Section 2 describes site preparation for the Niglintgak barge-based gas conditioning facility (GCF), which indicates that the river bottom will be leveled using dredging equipment. Currently the final set-down location has not been identified and dredging volumes have only been approximated. Therefore impacts to navigation cannot be determined. Volume 2, Section 3.3.2.2 describes the elevated flow lines required to transport the natural gas and natural gas liquids (NGLs) from the wells to the Taglu GCF. This section does not provide details on the location of the flow lines and the potential use of water crossings. Volume 2, Section 3.4.2.2, indicates that flow lines will be above ground to transport natural gas and NGLs from the wells on the north and south pads to the GCF at the north pad at the Parsons Lake field. However, there is no description of potential water crossings or crossing methods to be used. Volume 2, Section 6.2 describes barge-landing sites; however, dredging requirements for each site are not outlined and therefore impacts to navigation as a result of in stream work cannot be determined. Various tables within Volume 7, Section 4 of the environmental management component of the EIS refer to obtaining approvals from various levels of government regarding watercourse crossings. However, specific approvals are not discussed. Volume 7, Table 4.1 lists the notifications to Federal Authorities that the proponents are responsible for carrying out before and during construction. However the EIS omits reference to the NWPA, which is within TC's mandate. ... The EIS does not adequately address impacts to navigation or its significance as related to NWPA. ... (Au)

GNWT Beaufort-Delta regional workshop on the social impacts of the Mackenzie Valley Gas Project, Inuvik, NT, June 7 & 8, 2005   /   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Health and Social Services
[N.W.T.] : Dept. of Health and Social Services, 2005.
[1], 12, [42] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices
Title taken from cover.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: July 2005.
Draft report.
Running header on numbered pages: Draft report: GNWT Beaufort-Delta regional workshop on the social impacts of the Mackenzie Valley Gas Project.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Also available in French: "Atelier régional de Beaufort-Delta du GNTO sur le répercussions sociales du projet gazier du Mackenzie, Inuvik, TNO, 7 et 8 juin 2005".
ASTIS record 58537.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Government%20of%20the%20Northwest%20Territories/050818_GNWT_Beaufort-Delta_Report.pdf
Web: http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/pdf/reports/social_health/2005/english/mackenzie_valley_gas_project_beaufort_delta.pdf
Web: http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/pdf/reports/social_health/2005/french/mackenzie_valley_gas_project_beaufort_delta.pdf
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/health/58537E.pdf
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/health/58537F.pdf

... This workshop was intended to provide a forum for communities and governments to examine the anticipated social impacts of the Mackenzie Gas Project and to initiate collaborative planning to monitor and manage those impacts over the next twenty years. ... A group of corporations have joined together to develop three onshore natural gas fields in the Mackenzie Delta and to transport natural gas and natural gas liquids by pipeline to market. This project, known as the Mackenzie Gas Project, would span at least twenty years and is expected to have significant social impacts, however, it requires the prior approval of a Joint Review Panel. As part of this multi-year review process, the Government of the Northwest Territories has been working to ensure that the interests of potentially impacted communities are considered. In December 2004, the GNWT Department of Municipal and Community Affairs [MACA] held a conference in Inuvik for community leaders .... At this conference, a resolution was passed calling on the GNWT to convene another conference to address social impacts. Consequently, the deputy ministers of the social programs departments, along with the deputy minister of MACA, met in March to develop a framework for a proposed workshop. They decided to hold three regional workshops, one in each of the potentially impacted regions of the Beaufort-Delta, Sahtu and Dehcho (including Hay River). In order to gain community-level interest and involvement, community leaders were asked to choose participants to represent their respective communities. This report describes the Beaufort-Delta Workshop held in Inuvik on June 7 and 8, 2005 at the Town Recreation Centre. ... The workshops' goals were to provide a forum for communities and governments to examine the anticipated social impacts of the pipeline and to initiate collaborative planning to monitor and mitigate those impacts. This would include planning to complete community inventories of social programs and baseline profiles of social conditions. ... The workshop was organized around key questions that solicited the community prespective on social impacts and ways to address them. ... The answers to focus questions discussed at this two-day workshop in Inuvik will allow each community to better prepare for presenting their views at the upcoming public hearings in the Fall. The workshop was an excellent opportunity to network amongst communities in the region and in this way was a step forward in building community capacity as well as in developing regional strategies. The workshop may also serve as the basis for future collaboration and cooperation amongst the various levels of government in managing the social impacts of the pipeline. ... (Au)

GNWT Dehcho regional workshop on the social impacts of the Mackenzie Valley Gas Project, Fort Simpson, NT, May 30 & June 1, 2005   /   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Health and Social Services
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : Dept. of Health and Social Services, 2005.
[1], 10, [34] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: July 2005.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Also available in French: "Atelier régional du Deh Cho sur les répercussions sociales du projet gazier du Mackenzie, Fort Simpson, TNO, 30 mai et 1er juin 2005".
ASTIS record 58538.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Government%20of%20the%20Northwest%20Territories/050818_GNWT_Dehcho_Report.pdf
Web: http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/pdf/reports/social_health/2005/english/mackenzie_valley_gas_project_deh_cho.pdf
Web: http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/pdf/reports/social_health/2005/french/mackenzie_valley_gas_project_deh_cho.pdf
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/health/58538E.pdf
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/health/58538F.pdf

... This workshop was intended to provide a forum for communities and governments to examine the anticipated social impacts of the Mackenzie Gas Project and to initiate collaborative planning to monitor and manage those impacts over the next twenty years. ... A group of corporations have joined together to develop three onshore natural gas fields in the Mackenzie Delta and to transport natural gas and natural gas liquids by pipeline to market. This project, known as the Mackenzie Gas Project, would span at least twenty years and is expected to have significant social impacts, however, it requires the prior approval of a Joint Review Panel. As part of this multi-year review process, the Government of the Northwest Territories has been working to ensure that the interests of potentially impacted communities are considered. In December 2004, the GNWT Department of Municipal and Community Affairs [MACA] held a conference in Inuvik for community leaders .... At this conference, a resolution was passed calling on the GNWT to convene another conference to address social impacts. Consequently, the deputy ministers of the social programs departments, along with the deputy minister of MACA, met in March to develop a framework for a proposed workshop. They decided to hold three regional workshops, one in each of the potentially impacted regions of the Beaufort-Delta, Sahtu and Dehcho (including Hay River). In order to gain community-level interest and involvement, community leaders were asked to choose participants to represent their respective communities. This report describes the Deh Cho Regional Workshop held in Fort Simpson on May 30 and June 1, 2005 at the Town Recreation Centre. ... The workshops' goals were to provide a forum for communities and governments to examine the anticipated social impacts of the pipeline and to initiate collaborative planning to monitor and mitigate those impacts. This would include planning to complete community inventories of social programs and baseline profiles of social conditions. ... The workshop was organized around key questions that solicited the community prespective on social impacts and ways to address them. ... The answers to focus questions discussed at this two-day workshop in Fort Simpson will allow each community to begin the process of developing collaborative community action plans for managing the social impacts of the pipeline, if it is approved. The workshop was an excellent opportunity to initiate a dialogue between the GNWT and communities about how to move forward on building community capacity. The workshop my also serve as the basis for future collaboration and cooperation in managing the social impacts of the pipeline. ... (Au)

GNWT Sahtu regional workshop on the social impacts of the Mackenzie Valley Gas Project, Norman Wells, NT, September 30, 2005   /   Lutra Associates Ltd.   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Health and Social Services [Sponsor]
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : Lutra Associates, 2005.
[1], 16, [23] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices.
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: October 2005.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project.
Also available in French: "Atelier régional du Sahtu sur les répercussions sociales du projet gazier du Mackenzie, Norman Wells, TNO, le 30 septembre 2005".
ASTIS record 58540.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Government%20of%20the%20Northwest%20Territories/060202_GNWT_General_Submission_Sahtu_final_report.pdf
Web: http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/pdf/reports/social_health/2005/english/mackenzie_valley_gas_project_sahtu.pdf
Web: http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/pdf/reports/social_health/2005/french/mackenzie_valley_gas_project_sahtu.pdf
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/health/58540E.pdf
Web: http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/health/58540F.pdf

... The Sahtu Workshop was the third in a series of three regional workshops .... A group of corporations - known as the Producers - have come together to develop three onshore natural gas fields in the Mackenzie Delta and to transport natural gas and natural gas liquids by pipeline to market. This project, known as the Mackenzie Gas Project, is expected to span approximately twenty years and to have significant impacts. In December 2004, the GNWT Department of Municipal and Community Affairs [MACA] held a conference in Inuvik for community leaders and representatives of governments, industry and regulatory bodies. ... At this conference a resolution was passed calling on the GNWT to convene a conference to examine the anticipated social impacts arising from the MGP. In March 2005, the deputy ministers of the social programs departments, along with the deputy minister of MACA, met to develop a framework for a workshop on the social impacts of MGP. In June 2005, workshops were held in Inuvik (Beaufort-Delta Region) and Fort Simpson (Deh Cho Region). In September 2005, an opportunity arose to hold the Sahtu Workshop in conjuction with events planned by the GNWT .... The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for communities and the GNWT to come together to examine the anticipated social impacts of the MGP and begin working together to plan for and develop the capacity to monitor and mitigate these impacts. ... The Sahtu Workshop was organized around key questions to gather community prespectives on social impacts and ways to address them. ... The Workshop provided an opportunity for Sahtu communities and the GNWT to come together to begin discussion of the potential social impacts of the MGP. Unfortunately, the limited time (i.e. one day) did not allow for in-depth discussion of issues. The workshop will, however, serve as the basis for future collaboration and cooperation between Sahtu communities and various levels of government in managing the social impacts of the pipeline. ... (Au)

Written evidence of interveners submission to the National Energy Board, hearing order GH-1-2004, Mackenzie Gas Project, submitted by CRA - a coalition representing Alternatives North, the NWT Literacy Council, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Mackenzie, the National Anti-Poverty Organization, the Northern Territories Federation of Labour, and the Public Service Alliance of Canada North   /   Alternatives North
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Alternatives North, 2005.
40 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Partial contents: Attachments: Evidence for link between the Mackenzie Gas Project and the Alberta Tar Sands - Where will gas from the Mackenzie Delta Go? Bitumen development! - Natural gas supply for oil sands : Oil Sands Supply and Infrastructure Conference, February 24, 2004 / Steve Clark.
ASTIS record 59055.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367703

Our submission provides comments about the following issues listed in Hearing Order GH-1-2004: the estimated cost of construction of the Mackenzie Valley, the economic feasibility of the proposed project, the potential commercial impacts of the proposed project, the suitability of the design of the proposed project, the ability of the proponent to manage risk and financial liabilities related to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed project, the appropriateness of the Applicant's public consultation program and the adequacy of aboriginal consultation, the need for the proposed project, the terms and conditions to be included in any approval the NEB may issue. ... Conclusions: Given the major concerns we have raised and the lack of information about the true costs of the project, we recommend that the NEB not approve the Mackenzie Gas Project as it is currently proposed. If the NEB approves the project, we recommend the following terms and conditions: 1) The proponent should use a defined amount of renewable energy in project construction and operations (e.g. 30%). 2) The Federal government, in consultation with the GNWT, should coordinate a public review of the royalty regime and change the royalty and tax regime before any natural gas flows out of the NWT. 3) Mackenzie gas should be used to replace coal-fired and diesel-generated power plants elsewhere in Canada and should not be used to fuel the Alberta tar sands. 4) The proponent should delay construction at least two years, until northern residents complete training to maximize project job opportunities. The proponent should make specific commitments about training a certain proportion or number of women and Aboriginal people. 5) The Government of Canada should settle any outstanding land claims, such as in the Deh Cho Region, before the project is approved. 6) The proponent should identify specific commitments for the number of northerners who get direct project jobs, including specific commitments for women and Aboriginal people. 7) The Government of Canada, the Government of the Northwest Territories, and interested Aboriginal governments should sign a devolution agreement before the project is approved. 8) The proponent should cap the rate of flow to maximize the lifespan of the pipeline and allow NWT residents to better retain economic benefits. The proponent should earn the industry average rate of return on its investment but not the exaggerated rates that rapid extraction of natural gas would provide. 9) Mackenzie Valley communities should have access to the natural gas at a fair price. 10) The proponent should be required to use best practices as outlined in the Pembina report. 11) The proponent should be required to provide full and liquid financial security to cover remediation and reclamation activities for the MGP. (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project NEB hearing order GH-1-2004. Written evidence of Environment Canada. Submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005   /   Canada. Environment Canada
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Environmental Protection Branch, Environment Canada, 2005.
31 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Appendices.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
References.
Submitted on behalf of Environment Canada by Chuck Brumwell, Manager, Northern Division, Environmental Protection Branch.
ASTIS record 59058.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367754

... The Department of the Environment (Environment Canada) has reviewed information filed by the Applicants in support of their applications pursuant to the National Energy Board Act and the Canadian Oil and Gas Operations Act to construct and operate the Mackenzie Gas project (MGP). The proposed project will include three onshore gas fields in the Mackenzie Delta area, the Mackenzie Gathering System, the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline and related facilities. This submission presents Environment Canada's outstanding issues based on information provided in the applications as well as the supplemental information provided in the information requests in the National Energy Board process and the Joint Review Panel process. If any new or corrected information relative to the issues before the National Energy Board is brought forward by the Applicants or otherwise becomes available before or during the hearings, the comments, conclusions and recommendations provided in this submission may be reconsidered and amended accordingly. Environment Canada's submission focuses on the management of air emissions from the MGP and on ensuring that the construction, operation and decommissioning of that portion of the MGP located within the Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary is undertaken in a manner consistent with the ecological sensitivity of this federal protected area. Following this Introduction, the submission is divided into 4 parts: Chapter 1 provides an overview of Environment Canada's mandate; Chapter 2 provides specific comments and recommendations relating to air emissions; Chapter 3 addresses issues of concern relating to the Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary; and Chapter 4 summarizes the recommendations extracted from the text of Chapters 2 and 3. A list of potential witnesses and references are attached as Appendices to this submission. ... Conclusions - Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary: 3.30 Environment Canada has responsibility to ensure that activities within the KIBS, authorized by permit pursuant to the Migratory Birds Sanctuary Regulations, are consistent with the protection of migratory birds or eggs, nests or habitat within the Sanctuary. 3.31 Although each application for a permit is considered individually on its merits, Environment Canada has established an upper limit of 1% (6.23 square kilometres) of long term cumulative impact on habitat within the KIBS. 3.32 In order to reduce the disturbances to migratory birds, certain activities within the KIBS are restricted at specific times. In the MGP project area, it is likely that activities related to construction, operation, monitoring and decommissioning of the project will be restricted between the months of May and October. ... Air Emissions Management: Should the NEB decide to issue a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to the Applicants, Environment Canada recommends that the NEB consider making the certificate subject to the following conditions: 1. To meet the intent of the CWS for PM and Ozone, the MGP should be designed and operated using pollution prevention principles and best available economically feasible technologies to appropriately manage the emissions of PM and of precursors to PM and ozone. 2. To meet the intent of the Canada-wide Acid Rain Strategy, the MGP should be designed and operated using BATEA and BMPs to appropriately manage the emissions of SO2 and NOx. 3. Incinerators operating at construction work camps and other facilities in the MGP have the potential to emit mercury and dioxins and furans. Any incinerators used in the MGP should be required to meet the emission limits in the Mercury CWS as well as the CWS for Dioxins and Furans. 4. Should the MGP employ any glycol dehydrators for gas conditioning, BATEA and BMPs should be employed to reduce benzene emissions. 5. Before commencement of pipeline construction, the Applicants should be required to provide a more detailed submission on final design choices regarding compressor facilities and pipeline operation, addressing the following: i) a compilation of all of the measures to mitigate methane leakage and venting throughout the system, from gas processing, compressor stations and the mainline piping and valve systems; taking into account new best practices under development in the natural gas industry; ii) details on how overall system operation optimization and maintenance scheduling would be done to maximize system reliability and safety and to minimize methane releases; iii) details on design choices for the Inuvik gas processing plant for the capture of exhaust energy; and iv) details on the various compressor stations regarding unit size, efficiency and conformity with the CCME National Emission Guidelines for Stationary Combustion Turbines. Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary: Should the NEB decide to issue an Authorization to construct and operate facilities within the KIBS, Environment Canada recommends that the NEB give special consideration to the long term impacts of such activities on migratory bird habitat. (Au)

Written evidence : Mackenzie Gas Project, National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004, submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005   /   Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : DIAND, 2005.
19 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
The following appendices to this report must be linked to from the second URL provided for this record: Appendix A: Mackenzie Gas Project route characterization / C. Burn [described by ASTIS record 69127] - Appendix B: Mackenzie Gas Project review of strain-based design - loadings / W. Savigny, A. Isherwood, and A. Baumgard [described by ASTIS record 69128] - Appendix C: Mackenzie Gas Project review of strain-based design - pipe materials and propoerties [sic] / T. Kaiser and B. Roggensack [described by ASTIS record 69129] - Appendix D: Mackenzie Gas Project review of stream crossings - design, construction and operation - preparation of NEB written evidence / E.K. Yaremko [described by ASTIS record 69130] - Appendix E: Mackenzie Gas Project monitoring / A. Isherwood [described by ASTIS record 69131].
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Includes a list of proposed INAC witnesses.
ASTIS record 59059.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/Item/View/367794

Introduction and Mandate: 1.1) Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) has responsibilities for land and water management in the Northwest Territories. INAC's mandate is derived from the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, the Territorial Lands Act, the Northwest Territories Waters Act, the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, the Canada Petroleum Resources Act and the Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act. 1.2) INAC's main interest in this project concerns the suitability of the proposed project, issue number 6 of the National Energy Board's List of Issues, December 23, 2004. In particular, INAC is interested in the engineering design for the construction, operation and maintenance of the Mackenzie Gas Project's chilled, high pressure natural gas pipeline from the Inuvik Processing Facility to the Northwest Territories-Alberta boundary and the effects on land and water resources in the NWT given that there is no precedent for construction and operation of a chilled, large diameter, high-strength, high pressure, relatively thin-walled pipeline using Limit States Design (strain-based), in cold regions. INAC's written evidence is grouped according to the following categories: - Appendix A: Route characterization; Appendix B: Strain-based design - Loadings; Appendix C: Strain-based design - Pipe Mechanics and Materials; Appendix D: Stream Crossings; and Appendix E: Monitoring. 1.3) Each of these categories is discussed separately below and a detailed technical analysis for each category is appended to this body of evidence [the second url provided for this record will provide links to these technical analyses] and completes our written evidence. A summary of the recommendations follows the main body of our written evidence. A list of proposed witnesses is also attached to the end of the overall submission. (Au)

Written evidence of Mosbacher Operating Ltd. (GH-1-2004)   /   Mosbacher Operating Ltd.
[Alberta] : Mosbacher Operating Ltd., 2005.
19 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Six figures, all in separate PDFs, accompanied the written evidence of MOL and can be linked to from the second URL provided in this record.
ASTIS record 59069.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/Item/View/367899

[Mosbacher Operating Ltd.] "MOL" respectfully submits to the National Energy Board that the Application(s) as presently constituted fail to achieve the minimum standard necessary to support approval. While the objections of MOL are specific to the circumstances of MOL, we respectfully submit that they are indicative of inherent inequities underpinning the approach of the Applicants that, if approved, would ultimately impede the efficient optimization of the production from the existing resources, potentially resulting in substantial economic waste, sub-optimal resource exploitation, greater than necessary environmental impacts and consistently inhibit the viability of the applied-for infrastructure. The Applicants are applying to facilitate their own resource development, but are also applying to open an important incremental production basin for the benefit of Canada. The terms under which the basin is initially made accessible to the broader energy exploration industry and energy hungry markets, will ultimately bear upon, if not dictate, the economic limits of the resource development, particularly as they relate to small interest owners such as MOL. This stark fact requires that the Board look well beyond the narrow interests of the specific Applicants, and consider the broader interests of all potential resource developers that may be captive to the gathering, processing and pipeline infrastructure that is ultimately approved to be in the public interest by the Board. ... Specifically, MOL is concerned that if the development proceeds as applied for in those Anchor fields: Reserves from MOL lands would be drained by the Anchor field applicants; Resources within MOL lands could be rendered unrecoverable, by increasing development risks and altering reservoir dynamics; and/or MOL may be forced to spend large sums of money on the drilling of unnecessary wells and the construction of unnecessary production facilities, thereby similarly and unnecessarily increasing the development area footprint. (Au)

Policy evidence of the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT)   /   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : RWED, 2005.
6 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
ASTIS record 59074.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367816

... Q2: Why does the GNWT support the Mackenzie Gas Project? A2. The Mackenzie Gas Project will provide enormous opportunities for Northwest Territories (NWT) residents and other Canadians. This project is crucial to the socioeconomic future of the NWT's people and communities and is a cornerstone of the GNWT's plan for the present and future economic development in the NWT. For the NWT public, the pipeline represents employment, investment, and business opportunities and the pride of becoming a net contributor to Canada's economic well-being. It offers self-reliance and the opportunity for NWT residents to provide a good standard of living and quality of life for their families. It provides the opportunity to diversify our economy. The pipeline and resulting exploration will lead to new business opportunities for NWT companies, including manufacturing and value-added opportunities. New infrastructure possibilities and options, such as the potential for a Mackenzie Valley Highway, will provide impetus to expand our bustling tourism industry. The Mackenzie Gas Project is much more than the means by which specific natural gas reserves will be moved to southern markets. The project is the first step in connecting the significant producing region located in the NWT to North America's energy infrastructure. All indications are that there are very significant natural gas and oil reserves in the Mackenzie Delta and Basin and their development is a key to the economic future and prosperity of the territory. To realize that potential, it is crucial that the first major corridor be established appropriately and that the first major pipeline be viewed in the context of its long-term territorial significance. That significance takes two forms. First, the anchor fields are anticipated to continue production for at least 20 years and a significant royalty stream will result. While the GNWT does not currently receive any benefit from royalty revenues, the GNWT is confident that current devolution discussions will lead to a more advantageous structure under which the royalty revenues available from production in the anchor fields will benefit NWT residents. Second, it is particularly important to consider the longer term in the context of this pipeline because of its basin opening potential. Just as the original oil discoveries in Alberta in the 1940s started an industry which is reaching its peak some 70 years later, the development of territorial oil and gas reserves has the potential to fundamentally alter the territory's place in the Canadian Federation over the very long term. The selection of the appropriate corridor and the appropriate project design to start this process will thus have very long-term implications. If the project is done right, those implications can be uniformly positive. ... (Au)

National Energy Board Canada in the matter of certain applications for projects in the Mackenzie Delta and the Mackenzie Valley area of the Northwest Territories (collectively called the "Mackenzie Gas Project" or "MGP") ... and in the matter of National Energy Board ... hearing order GH-1-2004; ... pre-filed evidence of Paramount Resources Ltd.   /   Paramount Resources Ltd.
[Calgary, Alta.] : Paramount Resources Ltd., 2005.
28 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 59077.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367913

... Summary observations on MGP application: Paramount concludes its evidence by summarizing its key positions, grouped under key ratemaking and regulatory principles enunciated by the NEB. Requirements of the NEB Act: "... notably, the requirement that tolls must be just and reasonable, and must not be unjustly discriminatory." While the applied-for variable cost of service methodology may meet these requirements on a minimum basis as they relate to the natural gas pipeline, the same cannot be said of the NGL pipeline. That said, Paramount does not agree with the proposal for reasons discussed above, and recommends a fixed cost of service methodology, with periodic reviews in which reasonableness and prudence may be tested. Cost Causation: " ... tolls should be guided by the principles of cost-causation and user pay." As indicated in this evidence, the applied for postage stamp, even with the 80% application, is not appropriate for the MGP and does not reflect costs, which are largely distance-related. Further, no specific circumstances exist suggesting departure from well accepted volume-distance methodology. Paramount recommends the use of the volume-distance methodology, with or without zones, as appropriate. Economic Efficiency: "In striving for economic efficiency, the Board is of the view that the impacts on customers with limited options as well as the impacts on existing infrastructure are relevant considerations. This is consistent with the Board's mandate which, in practice, includes both the concept of 'protecting' and 'enabling'. Protection suggests that proposals be assessed in light of their impacts on existing systems, customers and market conditions. Enabling suggests that pipelines and other market participants should have the tools to compete effectively and fairly." Given the lack of detailed financial and contractual information, coupled with the proposed postage stamp toll, MGP is not advancing a pipeline financial model that provides for an economic, efficient, competitive natural gas and associated liquid supply to be developed. Further, given the application to have the NGL pipeline built and operated under COGOA, and previously discussed reasons as to why the NEB should regulate the NGL pipeline, the NEB needs to enable this recommended change. Prevention of Abuse of Market Power: "In the Board's view, this implies the prevention of discriminatory pricing, of inappropriate barriers to the efficient functioning of the market, and of favourable treatment of affiliates. ... Market power must not be allowed to be abused, in terms of both substance, which would need to be proven, and in terms of appearance and perception." Given the overwhelming dominance of the three major producer/owners of the MGP system, it is critical that the Board order MGP to provide an Operating Code of Conduct as soon as possible and in any event no later than the commencement of the oral section of this proceeding. Open Access and Transparency: "The Board reiterates the oft-repeated principle that shippers are to know in advance of negotiations the terms and conditions of access to a pipeline. ... The Board is guided by the principle that transparency with respect to the relationship between a regulated entity and its affiliates is important." The Applicants have not submitted a facility application that provides transparency or openness regarding access and tolls and tariffs. In contrast, their position on a number of issues, including access to the NGL pipeline, and a Code of Conduct, is a throwback to a past era of closed negotiations, with terms and conditions imposed by the pipeline operator. Innovation: "Past Board decisions that did not support a specific proposal do not necessarily indicate that, given current and expected market conditions, the same decision would be reached today." The fact is that this Application contains few, if any, innovative measures, that might be viewed as helpful in facilitating northern resource development by parties other than the producer owners. With Paramount's proposed enhancements on NEB regulation for the NGL pipeline, revised toll and tariff proposals and increased transparency, including a Code of Conduct, the project would provide further economic benefits to the North. (Au)

Hearing order GH-1-2004, National Energy Board, in the matter of the Mackenzie Gas Project : written evidence of Sahdae Energy Ltd.   /   Sahdae Energy Ltd.
[N.W.T.] : Sahdae Energy Ltd., 2005.
31 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Appendix.
ASTIS record 59080.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367767

... This evidence is being filed by Sahdae to provide information and analysis concerning the proposed use of electric drive compression at certain facilities to be constructed for the Mackenzie Gas Project (the “MGP”). This evidence also demonstrates that the MGP would derive substantial operational and economic benefits if the proposed electric drive compression is operated using a long term supply of hydroelectricity from the Great Bear hydroelectric project. ... Sahdae is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Northwest Territories Power Corporation (“NTPC”). Sahdae has been established by NTPC to develop the Great Bear hydroelectric project with its Aboriginal partners. NTPC is a statutory corporation, with responsibility under its enabling legislation, the Northwest Territories Power Corporation Act, to generate, transform, transmit, distribute, deliver, sell and supply energy throughout the Northwest Territories on a safe, economic, efficient and reliable basis. ... Q4. Why has Sahdae chosen to file evidence in this proceeding? Sahdae believes that the use of hydroelectricity and electric drive compression to meet the MGP's compression needs will provide greater operational, economic, environmental and societal benefits than the use of natural gas turbine compression. Sahdae also believes that certain MGP compression facilities should be designed and constructed to permit hydroelectricity to satisfy compression needs at these facilities subsequent to the commencement of the Project. ... Q5. What is the Great Bear Hydroelectric Project? A5. The Great Bear Hydro Project is a project to design, build, operate and maintain hydro-electric generation and transmission facilities to supply and deliver electricity to the MGP and communities located in close proximity to these facilities. The project's facilities include a run-of-the river 27 meter high earth filled dam on the Great Bear River near the St. Charles Rapids site, a 126 Mw hydroelectric station, approximately 600 kilometers of 237 kV transmission line, and associated substations. ... Q10. Which MGP compression facilities does Sahdae believe should be operated with electric drive compression and supplied by hydroelectricity? A10. Sahdae has identified the proposed gas turbine compressors at each of Little Chicago and Norman Wells Compressor Stations, as well as the two residual gas outlet gas turbine compressors proposed for the Inuvik Area Facility, as MGP compression facilities which are suitable for operations with electrically driven compressors supplied by hydroelectricity. Q11. When can hydroelectricity be available? A11. Hydroelectricity can be available as early as January 1, 2012 depending upon the successful completion of the development and regulatory approval process. Q12. Can hydroelectricity be available at the same time as the proposed 2009 commencement of the Mackenzie Gas Project? A12. No. It is not possible to successfully complete the steps required to construct and commission the Great Bear facilities by the proposed 2009 MGP commencement date. ... Q17. What is Sahdae's proposal for the use of electric drive compression? A17. Sahdae's proposal consists of two options: (1) replace the proposed gas turbine compressor at each of the Little Chicago and Norman Wells Compressor Stations and the two gas turbine residual gas outlet compressors at the Inuvik Area Facility with electrically driven compressors; or (2) proceed with the proposed gas turbine compressors at each of these facilities, and incorporate in the design and construction of these facilities all necessary piping interconnections to accommodate electrically driven compressors which would be installed at a later date when hydroelectricity from the Great Bear Hydro Project becomes available. ... Under Option 1, electrically driven compressors would be installed at the Inuvik Area Facility and at the Little Chicago and Norman Wells Compressor Stations during their construction, and be in service at the commencement of the operation of the Inuvik Area Facility and Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. As Great Bear hydroelectricity would not be available initially, electricity supply would be provided by an on-site gas-fired power generation facility. When Great Bear hydroelectricity becomes available, the on-site gas-fired power generation facility associated with the respective electric drive compressor would be put on standby, and would provide backup power should there be an interruption in hydroelectricity supply. As compression is already provided by electrically driven compressors at these facilities, when hydroelectricity becomes available, it would simply be a switch in supply source. In that regard, minimal interruption to MGP operation is expected. ... . Under Option 2, gas turbine compressors would be installed at the outset as contemplated by the project proponents. When Great Bear hydroelectricity becomes available, electrically driven compressors would be installed at the Inuvik Area Facility and at the Little Chicago and Norman Wells Compressor Stations, and the gas turbine compressors at these facilities would be put on standby and provide backup compression if necessary. All necessary piping interconnections would be installed at these facilities at the outset to effect a more efficient switch over when hydroelectricity becomes available. Q79. What are the advantages of Sahdae's recommendation? A79. Installing the electric drive and gas turbine generator set as backup will meet all the criteria identified in response to NEB Information Request Item 1.4(a). As noted previously, electric drives have the advantage over gas turbine compressors for unlimited cold starts, wider speed range, and faster run up time, they can accommodate operational changes much more effectively than gas turbines. Combined with the ability to be remotely controlled, electric drives offer a significantly more efficient solution than gas turbines to handle both planned maintenance and system upsets. Furthermore, installing electric drives at the outset would give the MGP proponents the flexibility to use Great Bear hydroelectricity when it becomes available. Q80. Do you have any concluding remarks? A80. Yes. Based on a comparison of electric drive compression versus gas turbine compression, the use of electric drive compression and Great Bear hydroelectricity to meet the compression needs at the Inuvik Area Facility and at the Little Chicago and Norman Wells Compressor Stations will result in 24 significant economic benefits to the users of the facilities, and will provide 25 significant socio-economic benefits to the residents of the Northwest Territories. Accordingly, Sahdae believes and recommends that the Mackenzie Gas Project should be planned and designed to use electric drive compression so as to provide the MGP the opportunity to use Great Bear hydroelectricity when it becomes available. ... (Au)

Key harvesting issues pertaining to the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Gartner Lee Limited   Sahtu Renewable Resources Board [Sponsor]
[N.W.T.] : Sahtu Renewable Resources Board [distributor], 2005.
ii, 33 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Appendics.
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
References.
Report date: August 2005.
Reference: GLL 50342.
ASTIS record 59083.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/384652

... In considering its concerns with respect to the Mackenzie Gas Project, the SRRB [Sahtu Renewable Resources Board] has prepared a series of recommendations that they would like the JRP [Joint Review Panel] to consider. These recommendations are supported by rationale for the recommendations and are ordered accordingly: direct project impacts; cumulative impacts; follow-up and monitoring; and research/baseline. ... Harvesting/Wildlife Compensation: The SRRB recommends the involvement of the community Renewable Resource Councils in the negotiations related to harvest compensation (Ch. 18 S D-M LCA). The primary contact for the Proponent is the district land corporations. There is no indication in the EIS that the impact and benefit agreements are including matters related to harvest compensation. The SRRB recommends that the MGP project not be allowed to proceed with construction without the completion of the harvest compensation agreements. The SRRB is aware in other parts of the Mackenzie Valley (i.e., Kakisa) where compensation agreements were not reached before the project was constructed and that these agreements are still outstanding three years later. The SRRB recommends that the RRCs and Land Corporations actively work on a consistent approach to harvesting compensation arrangements. The SRRB recommends that a regional harvesting compensation arrangement be taken i.e., all the communities use the same approach. The SRRB recommends that members of the respective RRCs be allowed to participate as observers of the construction and operational process to ensure that the impact to harvesting is kept minimal and within the conditions of the harvesting agreement. The SRRB recommends that the harvesting compensation arrangements include training programs/activities for youth to stave off cultural loss. Proponent should fund these programs. ... Pipeline/Rights-of-Way management: The SRRB recommends that any rights-of-way should be allowed to regrow to the width ofa vehicle that may be required for access purposes. It is the SRRBs understanding that there are no minimum standards for regrowth of rights-of-way and that it is at the discretion of the regulatory agencies and the proponent (J-P. Lennie-Misgeld, MVLWB, pers. comm.; L. Matthews, NEB, pers. comm.) to establish the amount of required regrowth and revegetation. As the main instrument for wildlife and forest management, and for concerns of cumulative impacts, the SRRB recommends that the rights-of-way should be as narrow as possible, taking into account safety and legal concerns (also see cumulative effects later). The SRRB recommends that rights-of-way be designed with appropriate blind corners to reduce the site lines and reduce travel corridors for predators in particular. This will reduce the anxiety of prey species needing to cross these areas. It should also assist, though, probably not eliminate the possibility of southern species migrating northward along these new “corridors” as has been happening in other parts of the NWT (see the range extension of bison to Rae-Edzo). The SRRB recommends that revegetation should be done with native plant species. The SRRB has already noted invasive species in the Sahtu as a result of other development activities. The SRRB does not want to promote the spread of invasive species. As well, prior to bringing equipment into the Sahtu for construction purposes, the SRRB expects that the equipment will be thoroughly cleaned to reduce the possibility of exotic species being transported into the area. The SRRB recommends that ice roads be constructed for ease of traversing. The embankments should not be an impediment to crossing. ... Proponent Wildlife Management Plan: The SRRB recommends that they be involved in the final preparation and review of the wildlife management plan to be prepared and to be implemented in the Sahtu including the bear, fox, wolverine and other scavenger animals' management plans. These plans should c over garbage, defensive kills, feeding animals, harassing animals, etc. ... Air Traffic: The SRRB recommends that air traffic movement be kept to a minimum. The SRRB would like to see air traffic restrictions be developed and enforced for low-flying aircraft, helicopters, etc. These restrictions should be included in Wildlife Management Plans. Best Practices: The SRRB recommends taking a holistic approach to the application of any “best practices” where the ecosystem is managed versus its individual components. Therefore, the SRRB recommends the establishment of 'Best Practices' approaches that will reduce the potential for cumulative impacts especially loss of wildlife habitat and loss of access to preferential harvesting areas. Included in these measures should be the establishment of thresholds or limits to acceptable change for corridor densities, habitat availability, patch sizes, stream crossing densities, special habitat features, and other environmental features. Also see cumulative impacts next and Appendix D. The SRRB recommends that the approach for cumulative effects assessment in the EIS be reconsidered on a regional planning basis as described in the above documents. This will establish a reference point for future development and give an indication of proximity to the change that can be tolerated by the species. The SRRB sees this as the only means by which they can track basic needs and ensure that impacts to wildlife and harvesters never reach critically low levels that would require drastic conservation measures. ... Cumulative Impacts: Establishment of a basic needs level for wildlife. The SRRB recommends the establishment of basic or minimum needs levels for wildlife as an initial indicator and threshold of change against which to measure current and future impacts. The basic needs information can be used to determine habitat size and quality necessary to maintain wildlife species at critical levels for the Sahtu Dene-Métis. The SRRB feels that the use of basic needs levels is an appropriate measure for the conservation of wildlife species. The SRRB may establish, modify or remove total allowable harvest levels if required for conservation and to the extent necessary to achieve conservation (Section 13.5 SDMLCA). To assist the JRP, the basic needs levels have been calculated for barren ground caribou, moose, marten, broad whitefish, lake whitefish, and scoter (black duck species) (Table 3). The SRRB recommends using these values to determine habitat size and quality. The SRRB also recommends that appropriate adjustments be made for wildlife harvesting undertaken by outfitters, non-beneficiaries and non-Sahtu residents. We also expect that there be put in place mandatory reporting of harvest stats for GNWT residents and non-beneficiaries who harvest in the Sahtu. This would have to be done in collaboration with the GNWT. (Au)

Greenhouse gas emissions calculations for the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development   McCulloch, M.   Neabel, D.   Francis, E.   Sierra Club of Canada [Sponsor]   Ecology North [Sponsor]
Drayton Valley, Alta. : The Pembina Institute, 2005.
33 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
ISBN 0-921719-71-X
Appendices.
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Report date: May 2005.
Presented by Sierra Club of Canada to the National Energy Board as evidence relating to Mackenzie Gas Project review.
ASTIS record 59084.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367494

This report was prepared for and resourced by Ecology North and the Sierra Club of Canada. The primary purpose of this report is to demonstrate the full extent of potential greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) from the Mackenzie Gas Project, based on its Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and associated reports. The Pembina Institute reviewed the relevant sections of the EIS and the initial responses to ensure the information provided was accurate and complete. The conclusions of this review were that: Generally, the data used in the EIS and its application was considered reasonable. There is a lack of transparency in how GHG emissions from power generation and compression were calculated. Information provided in the initial responses around well testing and blowdown events are incomplete. Overall, the total maximum annual GHG emissions, based on the base case maximum of 34 Mm³/d, appear to be an acceptable estimate (pending review of compression and power generation GHG calculations). Based on this review, further questions were generated for the project proponents. These questions are provided in Section 2.2. ... (Au)

Sufficiency of cumulative effects assessment   /   Canadian Arctic Resources Committee
[Ottawa] : CARC, 2005.
[11] p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 59089.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Canadian%20Arctic%20Resources%20Committee/CARC.pdf

... Conclusion: According to "Annex 2 to the Schedule: Factors to be Considered During Review" of the "Agreement for an Environmental Impact Review of the Mackenzie Gas Project": "The Environmental Impact Review will have regard to the protection of the existing and future social, cultural and economic well-being of residents and communities and will include a consideration of the following factors: 1. The impact of the Project on the environment, including the impact of malfunctions or accidents that may occur in connection with the Project and any cumulative impact that is likely to result from the Project in combination with other projects or activities that have been or will be carried out; 2. The significance of any such impact; 3. Any comments from the public that are received during the Environmental Impact Review; 4. Measures that are technically and economically feasible and that would mitigate any significant adverse impact of the Project on the environment ...". The Joint Review Panel does not now have sufficient information before it to consider these factors and proceed to public hearing because: 1) The Proponent has not identified and assessed the cumulative impact of exploration wells to find the undiscovered resources necessary to supply the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. 2) The Proponent has not identified and assessed the cumulative impact of seismic programs and associated cut-lines to find the undiscovered resources necessary to supply the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. 3) The Proponent has not identified and assessed the cumulative impacts of allweather and winter roads necessary to access exploration wells and gas fields required to supply the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. 4) The Proponent has reduced the number of undiscovered gas fields necessary to supply the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline as identified in its own submission to the National Energy Board without providing any explanation. 5) The Proponent has not used realistic assumptions regarding the time necessary to reclaim the physical footprint of cumulative infrastructure to a natural state. 6) The Proponent has not provided a spatial analysis of the overlapping cumulative impacts, contrary to the Terms of Reference adopted by the Joint Review Panel. 7) The Proponent has not identified and assessed the cumulative impacts of exploration costs and exploration-related employment. 8) The Proponent has not identified and assessed the cumulative impacts on airport capacity of rotating an estimated 13,142 construction-related and operation-related workers (not including exploration workers) in and out of the NWT. 9) The Proponent has not identified and assessed the cumulative impacts of an additional 1,248 construction-related and operations-related resident jobs (not including exploration jobs) on in-migration to the NWT. 10) With the exception of stating that "Winter based construction would contribute to reducing effects because of frozen conditions and the limited presence of wildlife." (p. 11-33), the Proponent has not identified any mitigation or follow-up strategies with respect to all the above cumulative impacts, contrary to the requirements of the Terms of Reference. (Au)

A review of the socio-economic impact assessment of the Mackenzie Gas Project - key issues for EMLC [Ernie McDonald Land Corporation] beneficiaries   /   Ernie McDonald Land Corporation
[Norman Wells, N.W.T]. : Ernie McDonald Land Corporation, 2005.
11 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
ASTIS record 59104.
Languages: English

... Sixty-seven [out of a total of 223] of EMLC's [Ernie McDonald Land Corporation] beneficiaries live in Norman Wells and the rest live elsewhere in Canada. ... The Mackenzie Gas Project ... is a major development proposed in the Sahtu Region. For this reason, the EMLC is interested in consulting its beneficiaries of the Norman Wells area on the project. ... From the EIS review, the one-on-one meetings and the community meeting, the following recommendations can be brought forth to the [Joint Review] Panel. ... -Timing of procurement information: EMLC would need at least one year of lead-time to prepare for procurement opportunities for the pipeline. The barge season for Norman Wells is from June to October of each year and the organization would need a 3-6 month notice to ship goods on the barge. The winter road is in operation from January to the end of March of each year and the organization would also need 3-6 months notice to transport goods on the road. The more lead time that is given by the Proponent, the better. ... -Independent Monitor: An independent monitor should be present when the company opens the bids from potential businesses. The monitor could ensure: compliance, bid selection, fair decision. The monitor could exist for each region or district. It could consist of a committee comprised of the proponent and different representatives from the region.. -10% Preference in bidding: The proponent should consider a minimum of 10% preference to aboriginal businesses in bidding. The EMLC suggests this as part of its negotiation in the access and benefits agreement. ... -Camp Infrastructure: The Proponent should negotiate directly with the community of Norman Wells (including EMLC and the town) in its deliberations regarding the potential uses of camp components following the completion of the Project. -Transportation Infrastructure: The proponent should consider building an all-weather road from Wrigley to Norman Wells. Individual Family & Community Wellness: ... the Regional Liasison Officer for the MGP in Norman Wells, ... should consider conducting 'house to house' information sessions with community members. Alternatively, the MGP or the GNWT could continue the funding of 'field workers' to individually visit homes and discuss the project. ... Education Attainment and Services: The territorial government should upgrade the existing Aurora College trailer in Norman Wells. This would enhance the community's ability to facilitate training sessions for the MGP. (Au)

Ecology of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Mackenzie Delta oil and gas development area : 2004 annual report   /   Edwards, M.A.   Derocher, A.E.
Edmonton, Alta. : University of Alberta, Dept. of Biological Sciences, 2005.
29 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Report date: March 31, 2005.
ASTIS record 59116.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/sites/enr/files/delta_grizzly_project_2004_annual_report.pdf

Executive Summary: The Mackenzie Delta Grizzly Bear Research Program is a partnership between the Government of Northwest Territories, Department of Resources, Wildlife, and Economic Development (RWED) (Inuvik Region) and the University of Alberta (UA) that focuses on management issues and questions related to grizzly bears and the development of a pipeline to export oil and gas resources from the Arctic to southern markets. Research activities within the study entitled “Ecology of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Mackenzie Delta oil and gas development area” include the collection of baseline ecological information and fine-scale habitat use and movement patterns, the delineation of annual and seasonal grizzly bear distributions, and the identification of key habitats and resources. The collection and analysis of this data in a scientifically rigorous format is required in order to provide tools for land managers to integrate grizzly bear conservation into land management at the pre-development stages. The Mackenzie Delta study area is approximately 20,000 km² and is bisected by the proposed pipeline route. This area includes the Mackenzie Delta watershed, Richards Island, the lower Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula, and the habitats between the Caribou Hills and Husky Lakes. Over the past 3 years hydrocarbon-exploration and -extraction activities have been increasing. RWED in the Inuvik Region, with support from the Inuvialuit Game Council, the Wildlife Advisory Council (Northwest Territories), and Hunters and Trappers Committees from Aklavik, Inuvik, Paulatuk, and Tuktoyaktuk, initiated a study in fall 2001 to look at the influence of seismic activity on denning bears and a subsequent study was started in 2003 to obtain current information on the numbers, distribution, and general movements of grizzly bears in the Mackenzie Delta and east to the Nunavut border. In spring 2003 the UA began working with the RWED. To date, 24 grizzly bears have been fitted with GPS radiocollars that record location information at 4-hour intervals over a 24 hour period. In July 2004, 6 of the 10 collars deployed in 2003 were removed using the attached remote collar release mechanism. Of the 15 collars deployed in 2004, two malfunctioned at the end of August resulting in only a partial sample for these research bears. In 2005, the remaining 4 collars deployed in 2003 will be removed and an additional 16 grizzly bears will be GPS radiocollared. In total, it is anticipated that 29 to 39 bear-years of information will be available for analysis. Fine-scale distribution and movement patterns of research bears within the development area were delineated for the 2004 active period (April to November); the process of developing a grizzly bear habitat selection model was initiated; vegetation characteristics at the microsite scale were recorded for a subsample of research bears; the additional sampling of training sites to construct a vegetation classification model was conducted and marks the completion of this part of the analysis; grizzly bear food samples were collected to develop a geographically distinct stable isotope index for the region; and a program was initiated with the University of Saskatchewan to begin analysis of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope for the Mackenzie Delta grizzly bear population. In addition, the numerous granting agencies were approached to help support the project. This progress report details the actions taken, methods, and preliminary results for the 2004-2005 fiscal year and discusses plans for the upcoming 2005-2006 fiscal. (Au)

Seasonal ranges of the Cape Bathurst, Bluenose-West, and Bluenose-East barren-ground caribou herds   /   Nagy, J.A.   Wright, W.H.   Slack, T.M.   Veitch, A.M.   Aklavik Hunters and Trappers Committee   Behdzi Ahda Renewable Resources Council   Deline Renewable Resource Council   Ehdiitat Renewable Resource Council   Fort Good Hope Renewable Resource Council   Gwichya Renewable Resource Council   Inuvialuit Final Agreement Implementation Program [Sponsor]   Inuvik Hunters and Trappers Committee   Kugluktuk Hunters and Trappers Organization   Nihtat Gwich'in Renewable Resource Council   Norman Wells Renewable Resource Council   Paulatuk Hunters and Trappers Committee   Tetlit Gwich'in Renewable Resource Council   Tuktoyaktuk Hunters and Trappers Committee   Tulita Renewable Resource Council   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development [Sponsor]   Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board [Sponsor]   Inuvialuit Game Council [Sponsor]   Nunavut Wildlife Management Board [Sponsor]   Parks Canada [Sponsor]   Sahtu Renewable Resources Board [Sponsor]   Tuktut Nogait National Park [Sponsor]   Wildlife Management Advisory Council (N.W.T.) [Sponsor]
[Inuvik], N.W.T. : RWED, 2005.
viii, 37 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Manuscript report - Northwest Territories. Dept. of Renewable Resources, no. 167)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment (where the report was described as a draft).
Manuscript report number for this report was found on the NWT Wildlife Division website under Research, Manuscript Reports. However, it was described as having 9 pages, as opposed to this "draft" report which had 8 pages in the main report, as well as 7 pages of tables and 22 pages of maps, for a total of 37 pages.
ASTIS record 59118.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.srrb.nt.ca/index.php?option=com_docman&view=document&alias=1410-seasonal-ranges-of-the-cape-bathurst-bluenose-west-and-bluenose-east-barren-ground-caribou-herds&category_slug=responses-to-information-requests&Itemid=697
Web: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.160.7115&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Satellite tracking data obtained for Cape Bathurst, Bluenose-West, and Bluenose-East barren-ground caribou during March 1996 to May 2004 were analyzed to define the seasonal and cumulative ranges of each of these herds. Location data were grouped into the following 8 seasons: calving/post calving (1- 25 June), early summer (26 June-15 July), mid summer (16 July-7 August), late summer (8 August-7 October), fall/rut (8-31 October), fall/post rut (1-30 November), winter (1 December-31 March), and spring, spring migration, and precalving (1 April-31 May). Seasons used were similar to those defined for those defined for the Porcupine caribou herd. Maps showing the geographic extent of the seasonal and cumulative ranges used by each herd are provided. (Au)

Migratory birds and important bird areas : technical review of the Mackenzie Gas Project environmental impact statement [by] Nature Canada, June 2005   /   Ecovision Inc.   Schultz, C.   Hazell, S.   Nature Canada [Sponsor]   Participant Funding for the Joint Review Panel Process for the Mackenzie Gas Project [Sponsor]
Ottawa : Nature Canada, 2005.
48 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
This report is included under the Sierra Club of Canada submission to the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project.
ASTIS record 59158.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Sierra%20Club%20of%20Canada/Sierra%20Club%20of%20Canada%20-%20MigratoryBirdsandIBAs.pdf

... This report by Nature Canada is a technical review of the adequacy of the Mackenzie Gas Project environmental impact statement (EIS) and additional information volumes in addressing birds and their habitat. The report is intended to assist the Joint Review Panel in addressing identified gaps and deficiencies in environmental assessment information relating to migratory birds and habitat. The report focuses on four main areas of concern to Nature Canada that emerged from its review of the Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in relation to migratory birds, as follows: 1. The EIS did not follow the Migratory Birds Environmental Assessment Guideline which was produced by Environment Canada as a guide to best practice in environmental assessment of migratory birds (Milko, 1998). 2. Other than bird species selected as wildlife valued components (VCs), the only other birds addressed were species at risk listed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), the Northwest Territories or Alberta. Species identified as conservation priorities nationally and/or continentally such as shorebirds in the Canadian Shorebird Conservation Plan (Donaldson et al. 2000) were not considered. 3. The species selected as VCs to act as surrogates for other wildlife failed to adequately address the requirements of significant bird species. 4. Important Bird Areas (IBAs - internationally significant areas of critical bird habitat - were not documented nor were potential impacts on these areas assessed in the EIS. The Nature Canada report briefly addresses the first three concerns, primarily to highlight gaps in the EIS. It provides a compilation of bird species of documented conservation concern known from the study area and outside the study area that are at risk of being impacted by the Project. Important Bird Areas which hold highly significant concentrations of birds and are thus vulnerable to direct disturbance and/or habitat loss or disruption are described in relation to the Project and potential impacts discussed. ... 3. Important Bird Areas within the Mackenzie Gas Project Regional and Local Study Areas: Five Important Bird Areas, together comprising almost 6,700 square kilometers, are entirely or partially within the Regional Study Area in the Northwest Territories. Four of these - the Mackenzie River Delta IBA, the Kuguluk River IBA, the Lower Mackenzie River Islands IBA and the Middle Mackenzie River Islands IBA - are globally significant, and one - Brackett Lake IBA - is continentally significant. A map of the Mackenzie Gas Project Regional and Local Study Areas showing the five Important Bird Areas is given in Figure 3.1. Each of the five IBAs in the Regional Study Area is described in subsequent sections below with information on how they meet IBA criteria and conservation issues. An additional coastal area east of Tuktoyuktuk that meets IBA criteria that was not identified in the initial IBA identification phase completed in 2001 is also described. Two globally significant IBAs outside the Regional Study Area - Mills Lake (part of the Mackenzie River near Fort Providence) and Beaver Lake (in the western bay of Great Slave Lake where the Mackenzie begins) - are also addressed due to concerns that they could be affected by Project-related barge traffic coming down the Hay River to the Mackenzie River. ... Nine areas of high conservation value were identified in the Mackenzie Gas Project EIS Additional Information for the Joint Panel Review (March, 2005). Areas of high conservation value considered included: hunting areas; undisturbed areas; areas with high species diversity; travel corridors; areas with unique habitats; and areas with high habitat diversity. Definitions did not specifically include the areas of concentration of migratory birds, such as breeding areas, colonies, spring and fall staging areas, and wintering areas or Important Bird Areas, as listed in the Information Requirements section of the Migratory Bird Environmental Assessment Guideline (Milko, 1998). The areas identified are Caribou Winter Range in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region; Travaillant Lake and Thunder River in the Gwich'in Settlement Area; Brackett Lake and Great Bear River in the Sahtu Settlement Area (Tulita District); and Blackwater River, Ochre River, River Between Two Mountains, Willowlake River and Sambaa K'e Mbedzh in the Deh Cho Region. Of the nine areas of high conservation value only one overlaps with an Important Bird Area -continentally significant Brackett Lake IBA. ...VI. Conclusion: Our review of the Mackenzie Gas Project EIS identified some serious deficiencies regarding the potential impacts of the Project on migratory birds and their habitats. This report focused on a number of key concerns and addressed these within the limited scope of funding available for review and analysis of available information on migratory birds pertinent to the Project. The concerns are: (1) the six globally significant Important Bird Areas, one continentally significant Important Bird Area, and one candidate globally significant Important Bird Area that may be negatively impacted by the Project; and (2) the potential impacts of the Project on shorebird, waterfowl and landbird species that have been identified as species of conservation concern and the inadequacy of Wildlife Valued Components to address the needs of these species or other birds that occur in notable numbers (such as within the IBAs). Canada has a continental and global responsibility to conserve migratory bird populations which it shares with other countries, particularly those that occur in continentally and globally significant concentrations and those which have been identified as a conservation concern. Had the EIS followed Environment Canada's Migratory Birds Environmental Assessment Guideline these and other issues concerning the impact of the Mackenzie Gas Project on migratory birds would likely have been adequately addressed. (Au)

Impacts of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline : impacts on [West Point] First Nation   /   West Point First Nation
Hay River, N.W.T. : West Point First Nation, 2005.
[6] p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title from a fax submission.
Report date: November 10, 2005.
Submitted by Chief Karen Felker, Chief of West Point First Nation.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59161.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/West%20Point%20First%20Nation/051110_Felker_to_Hornal.pdf

... The main concern that has been evident since West Point First Nation was formed is that because we are in the municipal boundaries of Hay River we are not recognized as a Government and therefore our concerns go unheard. ... We have high drop out rates and next to nothing for economic development for our members. Out of 71 band members we would say that 40 members don't have money management skills and this is a problem for our community. When this [MGP] project is underway, the members of our First Nation will not have any proper training to have an ongoing job to sustain themselves due to poor money management skills. ... We try to create jobs, but they are for very short periods due to lack of funding and resource people to maintain steady employment for our band members. The demand for employment is high in our community, but due to our funding and short periods of joint ventures, it is hard to compensate our membership. [Add to this] the fact that members have little or no experience in the work force other than the fishing industry. ... Our greatest fear for development is that we will not benefit and not have a sustainable economic base for our band members. ... Our fear, as the governing body of West Point, is that once the pipeline has been build we will still be in the same situation we are in now, with no sustainable jobs and [too few] resource people to keep up with the high demand that this project [has placed] on our First Nation. ... Most of our members have been impacted by alcohol and we have recovered from it and we continue to better our lives with the lessons it has taught us all. But with the new drugs that are plaguing our communities, it is far worse than what we have already suffered. Our children and elders are the ones who will suffer the most. If this issue isn't addressed soon, we will not have a strong voice in leadership for our community and our members. ... (Au)

[Submission on the issue of sufficiency of information on the public registry to proceed to public hearings : Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment, Joint Review Panel]   /   O'Reilly, K.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Kevin O'Reilly, 2005.
[2, 6, 5] p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
This record refers to 3 separate PDFs listed on the Public Registry for the Review of the Mackenzie Gas Project: Kevin O'Reilly - submission on the issue of sufficiency of information on the Public registry : PowerPoint presentation - sufficiency of MGP cumulative effects assessment; PowerPoint presentation - sufficiency of MGP contribution to sustainability; Cover Letter.
Date on cover letter: June 29, 2005.
ASTIS record 59235.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/O%20Reilly%20-%20Kevin%20-%20citizen/Sufficiency%20of%20MGP%20Cumulative%20Effects%20Assessment.pdf
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/O%20Reilly%20-%20Kevin%20-%20citizen/Sufficiency%20of%20MGP%20Contribution%20to%20Sustainability.pdf
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/upload/interveners/o%20reilly%20-%20kevin%20-%20citizen/kevin%20o’reilly%20letter%20on%20sufficiency.pdf

Please consider this letter and the other two PowerPoint files as my written submission on the issue of sufficiency of information on the public registry to proceed to public hearings. Please note that there have been some corrections and small additions to the PowerPoint file on Sufficiency of Information on the MGP Contribution to Sustainability as I presented it during the EIS Conference yesterday. In summary, I do not believe that there is sufficient information on the public registry to proceed to public hearings, based on what I have heard at the EIS Conference, and certainly with regard to the issues of cumulative effects and sustainability. I believe that the best way to fill existing information gaps on the two matters mentioned above, is through another focused Information Request by the Panel followed by public technical conferences under the auspices of the Joint Review Panel. These sessions must be open to all intervenors, but I would not anticipate that all would attend or participate. In the interest of scheduling these at an appropriate time to meet the needs of the majority of the intervenors and to allow the proponent adequate time to file a number of outstanding items, it would be best to schedule these technical conferences in the fall of 2005. I do not believe it is in the best interest of anyone to proceed straight to hearings or to attempt to resolve deficiencies through another round of IRs alone. I wish to make a few observations on the EIS Conference. The facilitation was generally well done given the severe time constraints. The lack of Aboriginal and community participation should not be attributed to a lack of interest. The problem, in my view, was with the timing of the event and the lack of participant funding to meaningfully be involved in the Conference. I noted the almost total absence of any organized government participation. Not one written submission or PowerPoint presentation. Although several government representatives referred to the work of the Joint Coordinating Committee and how this was transformed into subsequent IRs, no attempt was made to discuss if the IR responses met the information deficiencies that had been identified. I will not speculate on any causes for the appalling lack of government participation, but wish to remind the Panel of their authority to compel the production of materials and individuals to assist with their important work. In closing, there would not have been much of a Conference if it were not for the participation of the NGO community and individual intervenors. I trust that the value of this participation has been proven, especially given the inadequacy of participant funding. Although I appreciated the opportunity to participate in the Conference, I resent having to do the work that I expect my public governments to do as part of their role in building a civil society. (Au)

Comments on insufficiency of cumulative effects assessment in the MGP EIS   /   Montgomery, S.
[N.W.T. : Shelagh Montgomery], 2005.
4 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Report date: June 28, 2005.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 59276.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Montgomery%20-%20Shelagh%20-%20citizen/050628_MONT_sufficiency_submis.pdf

In the brief time allotted I wish to address information insufficiencies that pertain to cumulative effects of the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project. Without these insufficiencies being addressed prior to having this process go to Public Hearings, the Panel will not be able to make truly informed recommendations at the end of the Environmental Review. Likewise, in our role as intervenors we will not be able to provide the Panel with the evidence necessary for informed conclusions to be drawn. This may sound like an exaggeration, placing such weight on what has been identified as just one other issue during this three-day conference; however, cumulative effects are not simply a component feature in a piece-by-piece environmental review. Cumulative effects are broad reaching, touching on the biophysical, social, cultural, and economic aspects. Considering the magnitude of the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project, and its implications for changing the face of the North as we know it today, cumulative effects should not be minimised and sloughed off as "not significant" or "too complex" simply because their assessment requires more than sticking a probe in the ground and coming up with a number. That said, I will touch on a number of areas that highlight the insufficiencies currently before us. The first addresses reasonably foreseeable projects. ... [Also touched upon briefly are: social and economic cumulative effects issues like construction-related employment, in-migration, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal population balance, transportation, safety, health and social services, native land claims, and wildlife impacts.] (Au)

Air emissions management framework for the upstream oil and gas sector : final report   /   Clearstone Engineering Ltd.   Picard, D.   Canada. Environment Canada [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : Clearstone Engineering Ltd., 2005.
vii, 73 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
Appendices.
References.
Report date: October 20, 2005.
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. This version was indexed.
Also available from the Web.
ASTIS record 69125 describes the Environment Canada report that references this work.
ASTIS record 69126.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/441350
Libraries: ACU

The upstream oil and gas (UOG) sector is a complex industry characterized by a diverse range of sources, activities, phases of operation and types of emissions. Although a wide-range of contaminants can be emitted during each phase of operation (e.g., drilling, production, processing and transportation), many are not measured or reported. The types of emissions include volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from flaring and tank storage/loading, and criteria air contaminants (CACs) from fuel combustion. Mandatory emission reporting is required in most jurisdictions, although many compounds are exempt because they are below specified thresholds. While the focus of this report is air quality issues, greenhouse gas (GHG) co-benefits are also considered. GHG's are emitted from both combustion and fugitive sources. Alberta has taken the lead in developing air emission requirements specific to the upstream oil and gas sector in Canada. ... Currently, CAPP, the Small Explorers and Producers Association of Canada (SEPAC) and Environment Canada are sponsoring the development of best management practices (BMP) to assist the upstream oil and gas (UOG) industry in managing fugitive emissions from the sources most likely to contribute significantly to fugitive emissions and which would be most cost effective to address. This BMP is scheduled to be released by the end of 2005. ... The traditional "prescriptive" or "command and control" approach to regulating air emissions is being replaced with a "performance" (or results-based) approach in jurisdictions around the world. This latter approach places a greater emphasis on setting objectives to be reached, and accepts voluntary measures developed by industry and its associations. The shift to a results based approach allows governments to respond to changing practices and technologies, and shifts the burden of auditing and inspection from government to industry. On the other hand, performance-based standards are more difficult to enforce and offer less guidance, which may cause problems for smaller companies, contractors and suppliers. In addition to applying prescriptive and performance standards, some companies and regulators are experimenting with management tools, such as an environmental management systems (EMS). The overall goal for a regulator is to find the right mix of regulatory, co-regulatory, incentive, and voluntary mechanisms to suit the jurisdiction and the types of oil and gas operations being regulated. The setting of clear short term and long term objectives remains a key responsibility of the regulatory authority having jurisdiction. While these objectives are important for the information of all stakeholders, they are a critical consideration for industry in deciding to commit to the high costs and risks of developing Canada's northern and offshore frontiers. Moreover, it is essential that the government establish the necessary capacity to enforce and continually evaluate the effectiveness of its regulatory programs, as well as stay abreast of, and adapt to, emerging environmental issues. (Au)

Appendix A : Mackenzie Gas Project : route characterization   /   Burn, C.   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
[S.l.] : C. Burn, 2005.
19 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
References.
This document is Appendix A of the report described by ASTIS record 59059 ("Written evidence : Mackenzie Gas Project, National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004, submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005" by Indian and Northern Affairs).
Report date: June 2005.
Available as a PDF file on the DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69127.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/368012

... The Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) is a proposal to build an infrastructure unique in the permafrost regions of North America. ... But nowhere in North America is there a large diameter, high pressure, chilled pipeline transporting gas through hundreds of kilometres of permafrost terrain. The terrain varies from the relatively cold, continuous permafrost of the Beaufort Sea coastlands to the sporadic discontinuous permafrost in southern N.W.T., where frozen ground is, or is close to, thawing. The unique and pioneering nature of this project demands a thorough and conservative approach to engineering design. ... we recommend that the National Energy Board require, as a condition of its Certificate, that geotechnical field investigations and subsequent laboratory tests be conducted before final route selection and clearance of the right-of-way. Further, the Board should approve engineering designs for major stream crossings keyed to delineated geotechnical conditions before clearing of the right-of-way begins. ... we recommend the National Energy Board require delineation of unfrozen spans along the proposed right-of-way in discontinuous permafrost between Norman Wells and Thunder River, using a combination of geophysical methods and continuously sampled boreholes before construction proceeds. The data collected should be assessed to determine the locations where physically significant pipe strain may be anticipated, and intrusive remediation works are expected to be necessary during operations. These locations must be identified and presented to the Board in advance of pipeline construction, together with site-specific mitigation plans for reduction of pipe strain at these locations. ... We recommend that the National Energy Board require field characterization of ground temperatures along the proposed right-of-way before clearing. This information should be presented to the Board, along with an assessment of how such up-to-date determination of field conditions influences predictions of frost heave and thaw settlement along the route, particularly at the locations identified as critical spans. ... we recommend the National Energy Board receive field delineation of near-surface ground-ice occurrence along the proposed right-of-way; and in particular, the occurrence of massive icy bodies, including ice wedges, north of Inuvik before construction proceeds. These data should be presented to the Board along with mitigation plans to prevent melting of ice wedges, other bodies of massive ice, and ice-rich soils following clearing and construction along the right-of-way, including the disturbance associated with traffic, trenching, and construction cuts. ... (Au)

Appendix B : Mackenzie Gas Project : review of strain-based design - loadings   /   BGC Engineering Inc.   Savigny, W.   Isherwood, A.   Baumgard, A.   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
Vancouver, B.C. : BCG Engineering Ltd., 2005.
[32] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
References.
This document is Appendix B of the report described by ASTIS record 59059 ("Written evidence : Mackenzie Gas Project, National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004, submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005" by Indian and Northern Affairs).
Report date: June 2005.
Available as a PDF file on the DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69128.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/368015

... geohazards account for between 7% and 12% of onshore pipeline incidents .... For most of its history, the pipeline industry has taken a reactive approach to geohazards. Incidents were viewed as random and unpredictable .... Hazard identification is an explicit component of this process. Environmental loading mechanisms, which encompass geohazards, represent one hazard category that must be addressed .... The Proponent identifies four principal environmental loading categories: [1] differential frost heave, [2] differential thaw settlement, [3] slope failure, [4] seismic effects. Frost heave and thaw settlement are dealt with at some length in documents provided by the Proponent, which affords INAC an opportunity to critique the Proponent's risk assessment approach and risk control strategies, but only in relation to these two hazards. The same opportunity is unavailable for seismic effects, slope hazards, hydrotechnical events, and other possible environmental loading mechanisms. ... Despite the Proponent's assertion that frost heave and thaw settlement are the only uncertainties that the Mackenzie Gas Project faces, it is INAC's position that the Project is without precedent in Canada or elsewhere, and its strain-based limit states design leaves little room for error related to the magnitude and rate of strain demand as well as strain capacity of the pipeline. Thus, the Project requires risk assessment of all possible environmental loadings (singular and then combined) together with the strain capacity of the pipelines during both shut down and operation. ... Following is a more in-depth discussion of the environmental loading considerations that INAC considers should be included. ... RECOMMENDATIONS. 1. There exists the potential for the interaction of several loading effects or multiple events to occur in short succession, and which could have a significant effect on to the strain-based design. The potential of multiple effects should be evaluated in light of the details provided from the completed geotechnical investigations, including the effects of an increase in the number and distribution of unfrozen spans, or a change in the predictions relating to frost heave and/or thaw settlement. The Proponent should be required to satisfy the Board that its final design is capable of accommodating multiple loading effects. 2. The Proponent should satisfy the Board that the design will account for the potential for increased strains due to frost blisters at locations along the pipeline where heave and settlement are also occurring. 3. Slope stability failures can occur as a physical impact to the pipeline, significantly denting or rupturing the line, or by deforming, bending or stretching the line when the pipeline is carried along as part of the failed or entrained materials. The Proponent should identify potential slope stability failure sites and demonstrate that the maximum extent of the failure or run-out path for all forms of slope stability failures are incorporated into the project design. 4. Forest fires have the potential to remove the insulating cover which will induce terrain degradation, permafrost thawing, slope instability and increased sedimentation to water bodies. The Proponent should identify which areas have been previously impacted or have the potential to be impacted by forest fire over the expected life of the project and demonstrate that appropriate mitigation measures have been included in the project design. 5. The occurrence of earthquakes could impose significant environmental loads and subsequent strain on the pipeline. Therefore, the Proponent should satisfy the Board that the direct and indirect effects of earthquakes are accounted for in the pipeline design and appropriate mitigation measures. (Au)

Appendix C : Mackenzie Gas Project : review of strain-based design - pipe materials and propoerties [sic]   /   Noetic Engineering Inc.   Kaiser, T.   Roggensack, B.   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
Edmonton, Alta. : Noetic Engineering Inc., 2005.
16, xvii-xviii, p. 19-60 : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
Appendices.
References.
This document is Appendix C of the report described by ASTIS record 59059 ("Written evidence : Mackenzie Gas Project, National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004, submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005" by Indian and Northern Affairs).
Report date: June 2005.
Partial contents: Appendix C-1: Limit states design review / A. Palmer (BGC Engineering Inc.) and Noetic Engineering Inc. - Appendix C-2: Stress and strain - Appendix C-3: Pipe limits sensitivity study / V. Yung and T. Kaiser - Appendix C-4: Analytical approximation of maximum bending moment capacity
Available as a PDF file on the DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69129.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/368018

... Strain-based design allows material deformation that would not be allowed under more conventional design bases. ... the design proposed for the MGP pipeline is unique in terms of how it places reliance on many advanced design features: 1. Strain-based design anticipating displacement-load-induced strains in the order of 2%, nearly an order of magnitude larger than the elastic strain associated with the yield stress. 2. Utilization of high-strength materials: X80 and possibly as high as X120 as developments in materials engineering progress. 3. Maximizing the utilization factor, up to 80%. 4. Development of project-specific specifications for post-yield material properties and an associated quality assurance program necessary to extend the strain limits of the system. 5. Supporting development of new In-line Inspection systems capable of providing measurements consistent with monitoring requirements to detect pipeline movement and deformations. ... (Au)

Appendix D : Mackenzie Gas Project : review of stream crossings - design, construction and operation preparation of NEB written evidence   /   Northwest Hydraulic Consultants Ltd.   Yaremko, E.K.   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
Edmonton, Alta. : Northwest Hydraulic Consultants Ltd., 2005.
7 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
References.
This document is Appendix D of the report described by ASTIS record 59059 ("Written evidence : Mackenzie Gas Project, National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004, submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005" by Indian and Northern Affairs).
Report date: June 2005.
Available as a PDF file on the DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69130.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367798

... The Proponent has submitted documents that outline what his approach will be in the design and construction of stream crossings along the proposed pipeline system. The purpose of this document is to summarize our review of these documents in the context of whether or not the Proponent has adequately exhibited an understanding of the design factors to be addressed, and further, whether he has developed a design approach that will lead to construction of robust stream crossings for all conditions that are likely to be encountered. ... Conclusions: 1. The conceptually designed open-cut method stream crossings for the NG line have been based on so little quantitative data that they essentially provide limited insight to what the actual final design will be. 2. Several of these conceptual designs limit establishing a design pipeline profile to only the valley bottom, while realistically the crossing design must extend to both valley rims. 3. None of the designs incorporate consideration of continuous permafrost along valley wall slopes. At present, we have no idea what the Proponent's design approach will be to mitigate potential problems associated with grading, backfilling and controlling ditch and surface drainage in permafrost conditions on valley slopes. 4. In several cases, proposed sagbend locations would result in excavation depths within potentially frozen materials that seem uncomfortably large and impractical. 5. It is unclear whether proposed HDD stream crossings for the NG pipeline will be incorporated with the NGL pipeline, or whether the latter might involve the open cut crossing method. 6. Frost bulb impact on shallow groundwater flow along streams has been acknowledged as a potential problem by the Proponent. However, we have no idea at this time of how many streams might be impacted, what amount of modeling will be undertaken to establish which stream crossings will require a mitigation plan and what will be the Proponent's approach in obtaining the necessary site specific data for frost bulb modeling. ... RECOMMENDATIONS. ... (1) For streams that require 'designed' open-cut crossings, it is necessary that a 'crossing' be viewed as extending from valley rim to valley rim. A 'design' must include a comprehensive river engineering analysis (regime assessment; stream surveys; scour estimates; channel stability; a recommended top of pipeline profile within the valley bottom); detailed design drawings for river control structures), as well as a geotechnical analysis of valley slopes (supported by sufficient bore holes to characterize ice-rich soils; construction grading plans; special backfill requirements; a surface drainage plan appropriate for ice-rich soils; ditch block arrangement; mitigation plan to protect the thermal regime of the valley slopes; finished grades). ... (2) The Proponent must submit a 'typical' stream crossing design that incorporates a requirement to deal with a situation where there are ice-rich bank materials. In this case, an appropriate special ditch backfill would be used to mitigate potential thermal impacts in response to thawing of ice-rich material during the summer months following construction when access is likely to be impossible. ... (3) Frost bulb at stream crossings. The field data on the thermal regime of river sediments must be obtained in order to delineate sediment temperatures and talik extent at stream crossings. These data must be used in site-specific predictions of the development of frost bulbs around the gas pipeline beneath the stream bed. These predictions should be presented to the Board before construction begins, along with an assessment of the impact of such frost bulbs on interflow behaviour and pipeline integrity. ... (4) NGL pipeline - It is recommended that the Proponent submit detailed crossing designs for Major streams for the liquids line. The treatment of this line at 'designed' crossings relative to the NG line design must be established. (Au)

Appendix E : Mackenzie Gas Project : monitoring   /   BGC Engineering Inc.   Isherwood, A.   Canada. Dept. of Indian Affairs and Northern Development [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : BGC Engineering Ltd., 2005.
8 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
References.
This document is Appendix E of the report described by ASTIS record 59059 ("Written evidence : Mackenzie Gas Project, National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004, submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005" by Indian and Northern Affairs).
Report date: June 2005.
Available as a PDF file on the DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69131.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/368021

... The following material demonstrates the importance of inline inspection (ILI) monitoring of the condition of the proposed pipeline; and that ILI is a key to the success of the strain based design for the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. ... The Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) will offer many challenges for ILI monitoring. The proposed low operating temperature, high pressure and gas speed are beyond the capability of the most ILI tools. As it will be years before the first inspection surveys are required, these operating restrictions will likely be overcome by working with tool vendors. ... no ILI tools are able to measure local plastic deformation on the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline. ... The estimated cost of a deformation survey along the entire length of the NP530 mainline is $1,283,400 (2005). ... Should the National Energy Board decide to issue a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to the proponent, INAC recommends that the NEB consider making the Certificate subject to the following conditions: 1. The Proponent should provide a detailed risk assessment of the geohazards along the proposed pipeline route along with an evaluation and mitigation strategy to maintain the integrity of the pipeline. 2. The Proponent should provide the Board with detailed information on the specifications for the tools and an implementation plan for developing and using the tools. The Proponent should also provide the Board with the method or specifications that will be followed for the interpretation, resolution, comparison, and harmonization of the ILI measurements with the PIPLIN analyses and the laboratory strain capacity testing. 3. The cost of an ILI run will be significant and the tendency during operations could be to decrease the monitoring frequency. The Proponent should provide to the Board an operation plan specifying an ILI frequency for at least the first ten years of operations. 4. The Proponent indicates that aerial patrols will be used to monitor upheaval buckling, slope instability, frost bulb growth, and seismicity. The results of landslides and seismic activity can be noted from the air, however the features on the ground that may signify incipient failure cannot be observed from an aircraft. Only the extreme results of upheaval or frost bulb growth will be noted by an aerial patrol. The Proponent should provide to the NEB a monitoring plan that ILI will be carried out for the life of the pipeline. (Au)

North Yukon conceptual oil and gas development scenario and local benefits assessment   /   Fekete Associates Inc.   Vector Research   Yukon Territory. Dept. of Energy, Mines and Resources [Sponsor]
[Calgary, Alta. : Fekete Associates, 2005].
74 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
References.
ASTIS record 69163.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.emr.gov.yk.ca/oilandgas/pdf/fekete_report_final.pdf

Executive Summary: Development scenarios in this report are based on the resource estimates previously prepared by the Yukon Geological Service ("YGS"). Of the six North Yukon geological basins, Eagle Plain has the greatest potential for development and is the focus of this report. Peel Plateau is secondarily addressed. The YGS study identifies a gas resource of 5.39 Tcf at Eagle Plain, enough to supply a 20" gas pipeline for more than 20 years. Development of the North Yukon gas resources depends on prior construction of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline ("MVP") or the Alaska Highway Pipeline Project ("AHPP"). The optimal pipeline route for a North Yukon Gas Pipeline is along the Dempster highway to connect with the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline at Inuvik. Start-up of the Mackenzie Valley pipeline is predicted to occur in 2014. North Yukon gas is predicted to begin flowing by 2017. Based on available geological data, it is predicted that exploration activity will be focused in the southeastern part of the Eagle Plain basin. Drilling activity is predicted to commence in earnest in 2008, once construction of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline has been approved. A total of 873 wells are ultimately predicted to be drilled at Eagle Plain. Multiple directional wells are expected to be [drilled] from pads, thereby reducing surface disturbance. Employment levels will peak at 1500 during pipeline construction. The on-going direct employment level is estimated to be 178 year-round positions plus another 153 jobs during winter. Secondary jobs are estimated to be 100 to 200. Royalty revenue from gas production is estimated to be 61.9-143.4 MM$ per year. Although Yukon and First Nations governments will receive significant royalty revenue, the bulk of the royalties will flow to the federal government. The major benefit of oil and gas development to the Yukon people is therefore not in the royalty revenue but rather in direct investment, local business development and ensuing taxes. Oil development may proceed separately from, and possibly in advance of, a gas pipeline. Oil production from Eagle Plain could conceivably meet much of the demand for refined petroleum products within the Yukon. A framework has been presented in which the socio-economic effects of oil and gas development can be weighed and considered with respect to the span, degree and timing of each effect. (Au)

Natural gas resource assessments and deliverability forecasts, Beaufort-Mackenzie and selected northern Canadian basins   /   Sproule Associates   Chipperfield, J.L.   O'Blenes, M.J.   Drummond, K.J.   Mackenzie Explorer Group [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : Sproule Associates, 2005.
[174] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
Appendix A: Resource assessment, Beaufort-Mackenzie and selected northern Canadian basins, probability of field size distributions.
ASTIS record 69169.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/367937

This study was conducted by Sproule Associates Limited (Sproule) at the request of the Mackenzie Explorer Group, which consists of the following seven companies: Anadarko Canada Corporation, BP Canada Energy Company, Chevron Canada Resources, Devon Canada Corporation, EnCana West Ltd., Nytis Exploration Company Inc., and Petro-Canada Oil and Gas. The locations of the basins addressed in the study are shown in Figure 1. Scope of Work: The study consists of two major components: natural gas resource assessments for the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin and selected northern Canadian basins, and unconstrained resource-based natural gas production forecasts for the identified resources. Resource Assessments: The scope of work for the resource assessment called for the selected basins to be addressed in varying levels of detail, from an independent assessment of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin and Colville Hills, to a review of other selected Northwest Territories and Yukon basins. The assessments were to be based on publicly available studies rather than being developed from first principles; specifically: The assessment for the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin was to be based on the play definitions of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) and discovered field assessments of the National Energy Board (NEB); The assessment for Colville Hills was to be based on studies by the Canadian Gas Potential Committee (CGPC), the Northwest Territories government, the GSC and others; and The assessments for the other selected basins in the Northwest Territories and Yukon (Peel Basin, Eagle Plains, Old Crow, Kandik, Bonnet Plume and Mackenzie Plain) were to be based on published estimates, primarily those of the NEB, GSC and CGPC. In addition to estimates of undiscovered resource volumes within the selected basins, the resource assessment was to provide expected field size distributions by geological play and geographical supply area. The report was also to include a compilation of published assessments of the undiscovered resources in the Arctic Islands, recognizing that the Arctic Islands will ultimately provide long-term gas supplies for a northern pipeline development. Published assessments reviewed for this purpose include studies by the GSC, CGPC, Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI), the NEB, and the Circum-Pacific Map Project (CPMP). The resource assessments were conducted by Drummond Consulting (Drummond), recognized as an expert in this field, under contract to Sproule. ... (Au)

The Government of the Northwest Territories general submission to the Joint Review Panel on the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Northwest Territories
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : Government of the Northwest Territories, 2006.
ii, 70 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: February 2, 2006.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 58521.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Government%20of%20the%20Northwest%20Territories/060202_GNWT_General_Submission.pdf
Libraries: XQKNRC

Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited, ConocoPhillips Canada (North) Limited, Exxon Mobil Canada Properties Limited, Shell Canada Limited and the Aboriginal Pipeline Group (the Proponents) are proposing to bring gas from the Mackenzie Delta to southern markets. The Mackenzie Gas Project (the Project) includes development of natural gas fields, gathering lines and processing facilities in the Mackenzie River Delta of Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT) and transportation of natural gas and natural gas liquids through pipelines along the Mackenzie River Valley. ... The GNWT recognizes that the Project is critical to the long-term strategic interests of the NWT and to the social and economic future of residents and the communities. ... The Project has the potential to provide enormous opportunities for NWT residents and other Canadians. ... Longer-term implications for the Mackenzie Valley and the NWT must be considered in the context of the Project's basin-opening potential. The Proponents seek to create a very significant infrastructure corridor that will provide for the movement of all natural gas, liquids and oil discovered in the NWT to southern consumers. Costs with respect to environmental disruption or disturbance should be minimized, particularly in regards to the long-term use of the right-of-way to ensure the preservation of the NWT's unique natural environment and support for its wildlife and the traditional or cultural pursuits of NWT residents. Similarly, the route must be selected in a way that respects the significant socio-economic implications its selection will have for the communities and people of the NWT. ... Based upon the information currently available on the JRP's Public Registry, the GNWT maintains its qualified support for the Project. The GNWT intends to continue working with the Proponents and other Interveners throughout the public hearing phase of the environmental review of the Project. The GNWT anticipates that some of the identified issues, including concerns of others, will be resolved as more information and commitments are provided by the Proponents through the hearing phase of the environmental impact review. The GNWT will participate in the hearing phase to learn more about the Project, concerns of others and to consider adjustments to its preliminary recommendations to the JRP. The preliminary recommendations presented in this submission are designed to ensure that the Project is undertaken in a way that is environmentally, socially, culturally and economically sustainable. The recommendations are based upon a review and analysis of information available at this time and take into consideration the mitigative or remedial measures and commitments proposed by the Proponents on the JRP's Public Registry to date. These recommendations are intended to strengthen existing commitments and address areas not covered by proposed mitigative, remedial measures and commitments on the Joint Review Panel's Public Registry to date. It is it is integral to the GNWT that: (i) the Proponents implement commitments on Project-related impacts; (ii) the Project be subject to ongoing monitoring, mitigation and reporting; and, (iii) the Proponents complete a Socio-Economic Agreement with the GNWT. Should the JRP recommend that the Project proceed, the GNWT anticipates that the JRP will resolve any outstanding issues in its final report to the federal and responsible ministers. The GNWT provides its General Submission and preliminary recommendations to assist the JRP in entering the public hearing phase. (Au)

Fisheries & Oceans Canada intervention on the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : DFO, 2006.
51 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices.
References.
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: January 19, 2006.
Includes a cover letter, dated January 19, 2006, from Marc Lange, Assistant Manager of the Mackenzie Gas Project for Fisheries & Oceans Canada, to R. Hornal, Chair of the Joint Review Panel.
ASTIS record 58522.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Fisheries%20and%20Oceans%20Canada%20(DFO)/060119_DFO_Intervention_&_Cover_letter.pdf

This document is submitted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) to the Joint Review Panel (JRP) regarding DFO's consideration of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). In DFO's intervention, it considers the following information: The proponents' Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and supporting documents; The proponents' response to Information Requests (IRs) from DFO and other parties; and Technical sessions carried out with the proponent to clarify existing information and methodologies. Based on this analysis, DFO provides recommendations for consideration by the JRP. While this document forms the departmental submission, further detail to support the recommendations may be provided at various stages before and during the JRP hearings. The DFO analysis and recommendations in this intervention are based on all material available by mid November 2005. DFO may choose to modify this intervention or recommendations based on new information or analysis filed by the proponents or obtained from other sources. ... The MGP encompasses a range of climatic, geologic, vegetation and aquatic environments, ranging from Arctic to sub-arctic and north-temperate ecozones. The proposed pipeline will intersect over 600 streams and rivers between its origin in the gathering fields in the Mackenzie Delta, and its destination in Northern Alberta. ... All watercourses that directly or indirectly support fish or fish habitat fall under the mandate of DFO. ... The fisheries of lakes along the proposed route could be impacted directly or indirectly by the project, and as such are of interest to DFO. The three supply fields and pipeline gathering system in the Mackenzie Delta region will also result in activities in the Mackenzie estuary where marine mammals and fish concentrate or migrate through at various stages of their life cycle. Anadromous fishes carry out long migrations between spawning, rearing and overwintering areas to and from the Beaufort Sea and the Mackenzie River. ... The potential project-related impacts are of concern to DFO with respect to the Department's regulatory roles, and role with comanagement bodies under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement. In conclusion, all waterbodies in the project area will be considered in DFO's review of the project, as they potentially support fish and/or fish habitat. Given the relatively undisturbed nature of the project setting, it is critical that the project be carried out with minimal impacts to the aquatic ecosystem. ... (Au)

Health Canada's written intervention for the Mackenzie Gas Project environmental assessment : presented to the Joint Review Panel, January 2006   /   Canada. Health Canada
[S.l.] : Health Canada, 2006.
31 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: January 13, 2006.
ASTIS record 58525.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Health%20Canada/060113_HC-MGP-submission.pdf

Health Canada (HC) is involved in the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project as a federal authority providing expert information and knowledge to the Joint Review Panel under subsection 12(3) of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA). HC is providing information in its possession on areas related to its mandate to help Canadians maintain and improve their health. Specifically, HC has comments related to this environmental assessment on environmental exposures influencing health, including noise, air quality, drinking water quality, and the contamination of country foods. Furthermore, HC has general comments on the social determinants of health. HC recognizes that the influence of the project on the social determinants of health is not systematically to be considered within the scope of CEAA. Rather, these comments are offered in the spirit of contributing to the integration of science-based evidence with population health. Finally, HC also has detailed comments on accidents and malfunctions. In order to protect health and safety, project-related accidents, malfunctions, emergencies and outbreaks of infectious disease must be considered in project planning. In summary, HC's recommendations to the Joint Review Panel are as follows: that noise monitoring be undertaken in workers' sleeping quarters; that the proponent undertake a risk assessment for effects on drinking water; that the proponent uphold the principle of Keeping Clean Areas Clean with respect to air quality; that the proponent monitor contaminants in country foods; that an assessment of the impact on the Mackenzie Valley housing market be undertaken by the proponent and appropriate steps taken to mitigate risks related to overcrowding; that the proponent work with social and public health experts to improve the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment and monitor the impacts of the project on the social determinants of health; and that a detailed emergency response plan be prepared. (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's summary submission for the Mackenzie Gas Project : presented to the Joint Review Panel, January 17, 2006   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
[Ottawa] : Natural Resources Canada, 2006.
iv, 32 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendix.
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: January 13, 2006.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Contains a cover letter dated January 17, 2006 from Frank Des Rosiers, Director General of the Strategic Policy Branch of Natural Resources Canada, to Robert Hornal, Chair of the Joint Review Panel.
ASTIS record 58528.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/060117_NRCan_Cov_letter_&_summary_submission.pdf

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is a registered intervener in the Joint Review Panel (JRP) environmental assessment (EA) review of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). NRCan is participating in the JRP review as a department with expertise relevant to the project. NRCan has no regulatory role with respect to the EA process. The purpose of this submission is to present an overview of NRCan's role vis-à-vis the project, its participation in the JRP environmental review process, and to provide a summary of the topics examined in its technical review, and to highlight the department's resulting recommendations to the JRP. NRCan has reviewed the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) filed by the proponents as well as the supplementary information provided subsequently and during the three phases of information requests (IRs) that followed the release of the EIS. ... NRCan has focused its review on matters directly related to its mandate, and is offering comments and recommendations in this submission that it believes will assist the JRP in making informed decisions during the preparation of its report and recommendations about the proposed project. Based on the review of the EIS and of the additional information, NRCan's reviewers have identified over 25 subject areas that it wishes to bring to the attention of the JRP. The primary focus of NRCan's submission is on geoscience aspects of the Mackenzie Gas Project. ... Reviews on material technology for the pipeline are also provided. This submission consists of two main sections. Part 1 provides an outline of NRCan's mandate, its role relative to the project and to the EA review process, and its participation in the JRP review process. Part 2 provides an overview of the technical review undertaken by NRCan. ... (Au)

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) intervention to the Joint Review Panel on the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   Canada. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Natural Resources Canada, 2006.
[2], vii, 64 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm + 1 cover letter (1 leaf ; 28 cm).
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices.
Cover title.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: January 13, 2006.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 58529.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Indian%20and%20Northern%20Affairs%20Canada/0060113_INAC_Cover_Letter_&_Submission.pdf

... INAC has focussed its review on environmental, social and economic issues that may arise from the MGP and that are directly related to INAC's legislated environmental and regulatory mandate .... INAC's comments and recommendations are intended to assist the JRP in its examination of the proposed development and in making its recommendations. ... Chapter 2 presents INAC's review of biophysical data presented in the EIS related to the potential for land and water impacts and also examines the process used by the Proponent to assess significance. ... In some cases, due to the limited information provided as support for the Proponent conclusions, and absence of scientific certainty to support certain project aspects, it has sometimes been difficult to fully assess the potential environmental impacts of specific activities and proposed mitigation. As a result, INAC is concerned that potential environmental effects could be greater than that predicted by the Proponent. ... it is difficult to predict the potential impact of the project on the availability of granular materials in the project area. ... Potential [permafrost] impacts may include frost bulb formation, erosion or slope instability, and blocked or diverted water flow. However, mitigation of these potential effects has not yet been proposed by the Proponent. ... The MGP will involve the winter construction of watercourse crossings .... The level of detail provided by the Proponent through the EIS and responses to IRs does not provide an adequate evaluation of this potential for uncontrolled sediment release and the predicted impacts. ... INAC is concerned that the potential for metal leaching or acid rock drainage or related impacts associated with exposed bedrock and fill has not been adequately considered. ... The conventional use of ditch blocks (e.g. sand bags or foam) to manage groundwater movement through the seasonally thawed ground in the vicinity of the pipeline has been proposed. Limitations of this method, however, have not been considered. ... The topics covered in Chapter 3 include a variety of issues that pertain to environmental management and that relate to the Proponent's Environmental Compliance and Environmental Monitoring Program (ECEMP) including long term follow up and monitoring plans. ... it is our view that gaps remain in the Proponent's monitoring and mitigation plans. ... The ECEMP should include details about the type, frequency, duration, and methods proposed for monitoring, and provisions for northern participation. ... INAC requires that decommissioning and reclamation activities planned over the life of the project be integrated within the project design. ... INAC has in some instances been unable to verify or adequately assess the reasoning behind conclusions and impact predictions for biophysical cumulative effects of the project. ... INAC is unable to verify the Proponent's predictions regarding project impacts on areas of High Conservation Value (HCV), specifically as it relates to the establishment of a network of protected areas, due to an incomplete evaluation of the ecoregions referenced in the PAS Action Plan. ... This project will produce an unprecedented volume of baseline, mitigation and monitoring information. ... This work should be undertaken in partnership with governments, Aboriginal organizations, industry, and non-government organizations, building upon existing initiatives to support effective stewardship of lands and resources. INAC presents issues of concern related to socioeconomic impacts in Chapter 4. ... INAC anticipates that the MGP could result in a number of positive socio-economic effects in the NWT including: employment opportunities: increased personal income, skill development among the northern labour force, business opportunities, economic diversification, and other sustainable economic activities. INAC also recognizes that negative socio-economic impacts from the MGP in the NWT could include: impacts on traditional economic activities related to traditional culture; pressure on family life resulting from extended periods of time away from homes and communities; impacts on communities resulting from currently employed persons moving to MGP employment; as well as the impacts of an increasingly significant wage economy. ... Given the importance of hunting, fishing and trapping to Aboriginal peoples in the NWT, it is essential that any major impacts to the traditional economy be identified, and mitigation measures be considered. ... The Proponent has provided limited analysis on impacts regarding employment and participation in wage and salary employment, and related issues. ... It is important that Aboriginal and Northern businesses supplying goods and services have full and fair opportunity to compete for MGP related business contracts. ... The Proponent's SEMP [Socio-economic Management Plan] identifies principles and approaches for some socio-economic issues, but does not provide specific commitments. In addition, commitments have not been made beyond the construction phase of the MGP. ... The MGP is a large trans-regional project, involving numerous stakeholders and participants. Managing the socio-economic impacts resulting from the project requires a cooperative effort. ... (Au)

National Energy Board hearing order GH-1-2004 submission of Inuvialuit Regional Corporation   /   Inuvialuit Regional Corporation
[Inuvik, N.W.T.] : Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, 2006.
5 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
ASTIS record 59061.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/406035

... Although the Inuvialuit will be provided with significant economic opportunity throughout Project construction and operation, it will be the Inuvialuit that will feel the brunt of both the primary and long term social, cultural and environmental impacts of those elements of the Project that are constructed within the Inuvialuit Settlement Region and the ongoing developments that will follow. ... It is the IRC's position that the public interest requires that the tolls charged for transportation services be just and reasonable, that fair and reasonable access to the MGS be provided and that there be no unjust discrimination in either the charges or the provision of transmission and related services on the MGS. ... IRC is concerned to ensure the orderly development of the resources in the Beaufort-Mackenzie Delta region. ... The provision of fair and reasonable access to prospective shippers on the MGS will act to avoid any premature or unnecessary proliferation of gathering lines to serve field development beyond those of the Project prononents. ... Summary: Reasonable terms of market access and the orderly and economic design, construction and expansion of natural gas transportation infrastructure within an environmentally sensitive region are important public interest considerations. It is respectfully submitted that the NEB should ensure that these issues are addressed in order to provide for a truly basin-opening, open access pipeline system that will create a healthy environment for continued investment in the North, a sustainable economy in the Beaufort Sea/Mackenzie Delta Region, and foster the mutual interests of owners, non-owners, the Inuvialuit and all Canadians. (Au)

Alternatives North opening statement to the Joint Review Panel Mackenzie Gas Project, Feb. 14th, 2006   /   Alternatives North
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Alternatives North, 2006.
8 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 59087.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Alternatives%20North%20Coalition/ANC_Opening_Statement_Inuvik_060214.pdf

As interveners, we focus on social and economic impacts, public participation, and plain language communications. Within the Joint Review Panel's Terms of Reference, we're particularly interested in the following issues: -The need for, purpose of, and alternatives to the project. -The labour force, including the number of workers, where and when they work, where they come from, and where and how they will be housed. -Education, training, and skills, including what jobs northern people may or may not be qualified for. -National, regional, and community economic impacts, including revenue that different governments may make or money they have to spend because of the project. -Human health and community wellness, including literacy and education, poverty and homelessness, regional and local support systems, health and wellness programs, and local perceptions of health and wellness. -Infrastructure and institutional capacity, including schools and health services, housing, roads, garbage, and other community services. -Social and cultural patterns and cohesion, including how the project affects families, women, communities, and Aboriginal culture. -Socio-economic and cultural policies and commitments, including what the proponent or government agencies plan to do to help reduce or get rid of any negative impacts. -Cumulative social impacts, including subsequent, induced development related to the pipeline. -Contributions of the project to economic, social, environmental and cultural sustainability. ... From the beginning, we have voiced our concerns that the environmental review process is split into two separate parts - the Joint Review Panel and the National Energy Board. We believe that a single, integrated review would better serve the public interest, and indeed all northerners. We have raised concerns about participant funding. We recognize that the JRP is not responsible for participant funding, but we believe that the issues related to participant funding directly affect the JRP process and hearings. We believe that the amount of funding is quite inadequate - that this creates an uneven playing field and detracts considerably from the quality of the review. Lack of participant funding means the public cannot participate effectively. The JRP could help to compensate for this lack of funding by allowing some experts to participate in technical hearings by teleconference, as we have requested in a separate motion. Teleconference participation has been allowed at hearings in the NWT before and would still allow the panel to assess the qualifications of the experts. ... We expect the hearing process to provide an opportunity for the public to discuss and share their ideas about a variety of issues. Here are some issues that we believe are particularly important to discuss: 1) How the timing and pace of development can allow northerners to maximize employment, training, and other economic benefits, and minimize the damage to the environment? 2) Natural resources belong to the people of the north. Once they are gone, they are gone. We have one opportunity to benefit from resource extraction. How can we ensure a fair return to the public purse to extract and export gas from the NWT and Canada? What portion of the economic rent do we set aside in a trust fund for future generations? 3) What are the true costs and benefits of the project? What are the incremental costs to different levels of government and to the environment; what are the benefits of employment and economic rent? How do the true costs balance with the true benefits? Is this sustainable? 4) What is the end use of the gas? The end use of any of our natural resources matters. We need only to remember the end use of the uranium out of Great Bear Lake to affirm how important this is. So it matters how our natural gas will be used, where it ends up. 5) How can we use this natural gas to help Canada meet its own energy needs, and to make the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy in the context of a national energy strategy? 6) How can we make natural gas available to local communities, at a reasonable price? 7) How can we design and fund integrated management systems, to apply best practices, and to protect the environment? 8) How can we design and fund independent monitoring and reporting systems to keep track of social and environmental effects of the project? How will northern people participate in monitoring and reporting? (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review written submission - Joint Review Panel technical hearing on theme 2 : physical environment - land, water, and air. Topic 3(a) project routing and design in relation to the physical environment : Mackenzie Valley Pipeline and Mackenzie gathering system routing and design (March 14-17, 2006); climate change impacts / adaptations and effects of the environment on the project   /   Canada. Environment Canada
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : Environment Canada, 2006.
15 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Appendix A: Overview of key climate change research in Canada's North - Appendix B: Information requests.
References.
Cover title.
Submission dated: February 24, 2006.
ASTIS record 59091.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Environment%20Canada/060224_wr_sub_EC_Mar14-17-06.pdf

... Due to the direct impact that these changes could have on the project design, construction and operation, and the potential contribution to the cumulative effects of the project on terrestrial and/or aquatic ecosystems, it is essential that potential climate change/variability be considered in the planning and design of any facility to be built in the Mackenzie Valley/Delta. It is EC's view that, following the second round of Information Requests, environmental issues pertaining to the impacts of climate change on the MGP have still not been adequately addressed by Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited (IORVL) in its environmental assessment. Details which remain to be resolved are outlined in EC's technical comments, along with the Department's recommendations. The key issues dealt with in this submission include: i) Climate variability / climate change considerations for the MGP; and ii)Incorporation of climate change science into follow-up and monitoring of the MGP. ... Based on the information provided in the EIS, and the responses of the proponent to questions submitted through the IR process, EC believes the proponent has failed to adequately account for climate change and variability in its EIS and in its project planning and design (See Appendix B). ... Therefore, EC remains concerned about the potential hazard from the interactions between climate change, variability and extreme events on project components over the lifespan of the project. ... Recommendation To The Joint Review Panel: Climate change modelling employed by the proponent should properly incorporate the upper limit temperature scenarios (i.e. the 'high' projected annual and winter temperature changes over the upper and lower Mackenzie Valley; the 86% percentile of projected increases, as outlined in Burn, 2003) to ensure that the safety margins built into the design are adequate to cover the range of future temperature conditions including their variability and extremes. ... Recommendations To The Joint Review Panel: 1. The proponent should develop and implement a collaborative, long-term plan to suitably assess climate change/variability effects on the project and project interactions with VECs over the entire project area. 2. The proponent should conduct a thorough analysis and review of the observed climate variability and change over the project region and report its findings at regular intervals (eg every five years) throughout the lifetime of the project. Climate reports should include proper documentation of calibration procedures, error analyses, identification of corrections in instrumentation, and interpretation of seasonal trends and/or extreme events in the data including any identified impacts of climate change on the project. 3. The proponent should utilize information from the existing territorial lightning detection network to aid in the identification and mitigation of possible fire threats to the pipeline. ... Conclusion: The Mackenzie Basin has experienced some of the greatest warming over the last 50 years. Model projections of future warming in Arctic regions and further increases to precipitation (e.g. Walsh et al. 2005) suggest even further changes to the climate of the Mackenzie Basin. The technical basis for IORVL concluding that climate variability/climate change is unlikely to affect the structural integrity of the pipeline and associated anchor field facilities during all phases of the project (i.e. all phases over the next 30-40 years) has not been demonstrated. EC remains concerned about the potential hazard from the interactions between climate change, variability and extreme events on project components over the lifespan of the project. Climate variability and change poses a potentially serious threat to the structural integrity of the project, and appropriate assessment, monitoring, and mitigation/adaptation approaches must be incorporated as early as possible. (Au)

Sound propagation from the Taglu gas conditioning facility under two sound abatement conditions   /   ATCO Noise Management Ltd.   Canadian Wildlife Service [Sponsor]
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.?] : CWS [distributor], 2006.
iii, 30 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Appendix.
Project no. 672700.
EC/CWS report: Sound propagation from the Taglu gas conditioning facility under two sound abatement conditions - attachment to EC letter to IORVL dated 28 April 2006 re: Questions regarding facility design in relation to noise that were deferred from Joint Review Panel Hearing on March 20th, 2006.
Report dated: February 23, 2006.
ASTIS record 59092.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/603488

Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) contracted ATCO Noise Management (ANM) to conduct an analysis of the noise output for the Taglu Gas Conditioning Facility located in the Kendall Island Migratory Bird Sanctuary with standard acoustical installations and with maximum noise abatement scenarios. The scope of work requests ANM to supply: 1. A letter outlining the current approach to noise management being used by the proponent of the Mackenzie Gas Project for the Taglu Gas Conditioning Facility. The current approach is contained in a public document titled Noise Modelling Methods, prepared for Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited (IORVL) by AMEC Americas Limited (AMEC), February 2005. 2. A detailed, quantitative analysis of sound propagation of the above mentioned facility using ANM's own model and expertise in: a. Baseline conditions as designed by proponent; b. Conditions with an ANM "standard" acoustical installation; c. Conditions with "full noise abatement technology" applied. As the basis for the more detailed analysis, CWS directed ANM to the following public documents prepared by IORVL: 1. Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Mackenzie Gas Project, Volume 5, Biophysical 1A, Section 3, Noise, August 2004. 2. Production Facilities, Section 6.1, Application for Approval of the Development Plan for the Taglu Field, Project Description, August 2004. 3. Data from IORVL on inputs and assumptions used in the noise modeling exercise prepared by AMEC including a site plan for the Taglu GCF, all provided via Information Request EC 3.02. ANM submitted its review of the acoustical methodology provided in Noise Modelling Methods in a letter dated October 21, 2005. This report fulfills the second requirement of the contracted scope of work. Provided herein is a quantitative analysis of sound propagation from the Taglu facility for two levels of sound abatement. To conduct the analysis, ANM reviewed information contained in the above public documents and the Cadna/A acoustic model developed for the purpose of the EIS and obtained in the Information Request EC 3.02, 5th Dec 2005. These public documents contained insufficient technical data from which to fully re-create the "baseline conditions as designed by the proponent." ANM used sound power levels (Lw's) derived directly from equipment vendors, or field measurements of similar installed equipment collected by ANM, to model the facility. Conclusion: ... The best practice mitigation scenario for data provided by IORVL and the specified Taglu GCF layout includes: Upgrade of 2x Taurus 70 exhaust silencers manufactured from stainless steel 316L, assuming the upgrade is completed during the 'procurement' stage of the project. Upgrade of 1x Centaur 50 exhaust silencer manufactured from stainless steel 316L, assuming the upgrade is completed during the 'procurement' stage of the project. Upgrade of 52x Cooler Fans to 'Howden SX type' or equivalent super-low noise fans, assuming the upgrade is completed during the 'procurement' stage of the project. Installation of noise barriers around fans. (Au)

Key migratory bird terrestrial habitat sites in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut   /   Latour, P.B.   Leger, J.   Hines, J.E.   Mallory, M.L.   Mulders, D.L.   Gilchrist, H.G.   Smith, P.A.   Dickson, D.L.
3rd ed.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Environment Canada, 2006.
121 p. (in 7 parts) : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from PDF files on the Web.
This report is in seven parts: Environment Canada Occasional Paper "Key migratory bird terrestrial habitat sites in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut" - Part 1 of 7, Part 2 of 7 etc. (each with a distinct URL) that can be located in Environment Canada's submission to the JRP, the first URL provided in this record.
Parts 1 and 2 are especially relevant to the Mackenzie Gas Project, and describe migratory bird habitat in the Beaufort Sea region, Mackenzie Delta, Mackenzie River region and the Kendall Island Migratory Bird Sanctuary. The second URL provided in this record links to part 1, the third URL links to part 2.
Appendices.
Bibliography: p. 108-116.
Cover title.
Report dated: March 2006.
Occasional paper of Canadian Wildlife Service.
First edition: ASTIS record 15934.
Second edition: ASTIS record 35367.
ASTIS record 59095.
Languages: English
Web: http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/317630/publication.html

This report identifies 83 key terrestrial habitat sites for migratory birds in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. These sites support at least 1% of the Canadian population of at least one migratory bird species (or, in some cases, subspecies). Sites also include marine and freshwater habitats where the value of the terrestrial habitat is intimately linked to the presence of aquatic habitats. Data for the identification of sites were drawn from existing published and unpublished reports and personal communications. In this updating of key terrestrial habitat sites in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, eight new sites have been added and two have been removed. Four sites listed in the previous editions have been combined under a single location. Many of the sites recognized in earlier listings have been revised, some quite substantially. Eighteen of the key terrestrial habitat sites overlap with existing Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, and two sites overlap with National Wildlife Areas. This report describes key terrestrial habitat areas that are essential to the welfare of various migratory bird species in Canada. It serves as a statement of Canadian Wildlife Service interest in lands where special wildlife conservation measures may be required, and it is offered as a guide to the conservation efforts of other agencies having interests in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. [For each site a description of the site is presented; its biological value is discussed; sensitivities, potential conflicts are discussed in terms of resource development, land use, pollution and disturbance; and the status of each site is assessed.] (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review - Joint Review Panel : Environment Canada summary overview of written evidence   /   Canada. Environment Canada
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Environment Canada, 2006.
15 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Report dated: January 18, 2006.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 59098.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Environment%20Canada/060118_EC_Cover_letter_&_Overview_Submission.pdf

The proponent, Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Ltd (IORV), on behalf of the Mackenzie Gas consortium (which includes Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited, Shell Canada Limited, Conoco-Phillips Canada (North) Limited, Exxon-Mobil Canada Properties, and the Aboriginal Pipeline Group) has proposed to construct, operate, and decommission natural gas production and gathering facilities in the Mackenzie Delta, as well as natural gas and natural gas liquids transportation pipelines from the Mackenzie Delta to northwestern Alberta, along the Mackenzie Valley (as described in Annex 1-Project Description under the Schedule-Joint Review Panel Mandate within the Agreement for an Environmental Impact Review of the Mackenzie Gas Project (8/18/2004)). Collectively the above-referenced facilities are components of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP or Project). This project is generally referred to as the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). Environment Canada (EC) has evaluated the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), supplemental information and responses to Information Requests (IR) filed by the proponent. The following overview summarizes key elements of Environment Canada's anticipated technical submissions to be made during the Public Hearing Phase of the MGP Joint Review Panel (JRP) environmental assessment review. This document will introduce and clearly state the purpose and objectives of the Environment Canada (EC) submission, provide initial observations on each issue of significance to EC, and identify how the Department intends to participate in the hearing process. The submission is intended to be an overview to set the stage for what the Department expects to present throughout the public hearing process. Detailed technical submissions on each topic identified in this submission will be filed in accordance with the schedule and directions issued by the JRP. If any new information is brought forward by the Proponent or other interveners after November 18, 2005, or if new analyses are conducted, EC may be required to reconsider and amend this and other relevant submissions accordingly. EC based its analyses on the principle that the MGP, if approved, should be planned, built, operated, and decommissioned in a manner that ensures the highest level of environmental quality so that the well-being of Canadians is enhanced, and the natural environment is conserved. (Au)

Modelling seasonal habitats of boreal woodland caribou at the northern limits of their range : a preliminary assessment of the lower Mackenzie River valley, Northwest Territories, Canada   /   Nagy, J.A.   Derocher, A.E.   Nielsen, S.E.   Wright, W.H.   Heikkila, J.M.
Inuvik, N.W.T. : Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources, 2006.
36 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Report date: April 27, 2006.
ASTIS record 59105.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/sites/enr/files/modelling_seasonal_habits_of_boreal_woodland_caribou.pdf

Introduction: The northernmost range of boreal woodland caribou in Canada is in the Mackenzie River Delta area, Northwest Territories. Unlike barren-ground (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus), Peary (R.t. pearyi), and mountain woodland caribou (R.t. caribou), boreal woodland caribou (R.t. caribou) in this area had not been the focus of scientific studies in the NWT until recently (Nagy et al. 2003; Nagy et al. 2005a). Threats to boreal woodland caribou habitat include oil and gas exploration and development, roads and hydro developments, increased tourism and other non-consumptive human activities, forest fires, and climate change (Dyer et al. 2001; Dyer 1999; Dyer et al. 2002; Bradshaw et al. 1997; Bradshaw et al. 1998; Courtois et al. 2003; Schaefer and Pruitt 1991; Bayne et al. 2005). The degree of impact of past human disturbances and wildfires on boreal woodland caribou habitat in the NWT is not un-known. Elsewhere in Canada human activities and natural habitat disturbances have been shown to negatively affect caribou. In some areas, such as Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, boreal woodland caribou were extirpated. The boreal woodland caribou range in the lower Mackenzie River Valley has already been altered by seismic activities, wildfires, and road development. The Mackenzie River Delta area is currently experiencing a significant increase in oil and gas exploration and extraction (Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited 2004). A pipeline along the Mackenzie River Valley has been proposed to deliver natural gas to the south (Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited 2004). These activities and subsequent gas exploration and development activities may have an impact on boreal woodland caribou and their habitats in the lower Mackenzie River area. Linear disturbances such as seismic lines, roads, and cutlines, have significantly affected many wildlife populations throughout the world (James and Stuart-Smith 2000). Many wildlife species have been documented to avoid habitats with high densities of linear disturbances (McLellan and Shackleton 1988; Linke et al. 2005; Dyer et al. 2002). Renewed oil and gas development in the north will cause higher densities of linear disturbance, resulting mainly from seismic activity. Over 37,000 km of seismic lines were cut in the Mackenzie River Delta area from 1960 to 1990 (National Energy Board Records). The impacts of linear disturbance on wildlife in a northern environment have been poorly studied, however it is clear that permafrost terrain is easily degraded (Lambert 1972; Mackay 1970; Nicholas and Hinkel 1996; Zoltai and Pettapiece 1973) and disturbed vegetation is slow to recover (Billings 1987; Harper and Kershaw 1996). This suggests that 1) disturbance is more likely to alter wildlife habitat in the north; and 2) any alteration of wildlife habitat will last longer. Climate change models for the Mackenzie River Valley predict an increase in wildfire frequency and severity (Kadonga 1997), increased snowfall across the region, the incursion of new species including forest pests (Sieben et al. 1997) and parasites (Kutz et al. 2004; Kutz et al. 2005), and significant changes in forest composition (Hartley and Marshall 1997; Chapin et al. 2004). How these changes will impact boreal woodland caribou is unknown. In response to large-scale potential changes in habitats and animal populations, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, GNWT in partnership with the Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board began collecting baseline information on boreal woodland caribou in the lower Mackenzie River area in 2001. Traditional knowledge of woodland caribou was documented during the winter of 2001/2002 (Auriat unpublished data). In the fall of 2001, a more detailed assessment was initiated to collect baseline information on the demography, distribution, movements, home range size, and habitat use for boreal woodland caribou in the Lower Mackenzie River area (Nagy et al. 2003; Nagy et al. 2005 a). Here we expand on these reports to provide descriptions of seasonal caribou habitat use and spatial representations of caribou habitat using a GIS (Geographic Information System), resource selection functions (RSF), and satellite tracking data collected from May 2002 to January 2006. We describe the predictive capacity of models and assess the effect of sample size for their ability to predict population-level habitat conditions. We modified the linear stretch method used by Johnson et al. (2004) to map the models beyond the boundaries of the study area. Ultimately, RSF models were designed to establish seasonal habitat baselines that can be used to assess the impacts of future climate change and oil/gas development (Johnson et al. 2004; Nielsen et al. 2006). (Au)

Caribou forever - our heritage, our responsibility : a barren-ground caribou management strategy for the Northwest Territories, 2006-2010   /   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : ENR (GNWT), 2006.
38 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Appendices.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment. The final report can be found on the second URL provided in this record.
ASTIS record 59107.
Languages: English
Web: http://reviewboard.ca/upload/project_document/EA0506-008_Caribou_Forever_-_Caribou_Mgmt_Strategy.pdf

... Background: Barren-ground caribou herds are migratory and hunted by Dene, Inuvialuit, Métis and non-aboriginal people from almost all communities on mainland Northwest Territories (NWT). The social and cultural value of caribou to residents of the NWT is immense. Information collected from harvest studies by co-management boards, winter road check stations, community hunts, outfitter returns and resident hunter surveys provides a minimum annual harvest estimate of 11,000 caribou. The minimum economic value of this harvest is $17 million dollars. Barren-ground caribou surveys conducted since 2000 indicate that five NWT barren-ground caribou herds are declining (Porcupine, Cape Bathurst, Bluenose-West, Bluenose-East and Bathurst). The status of three herds is unknown since the early 1990s (Beverly, Qamanirjuaq, Ahiak). Actions taken during the next five years will have a strategic effect on recovery of caribou herds. This management strategy focuses on actions required between 2006 and 2010. ... Human Activities and Impacts: Harvesting can have a direct impact on the size of a herd. Under the NWT Wildlife Act, government can set the number, location and season for caribou harvesting by non-resident hunters and resident hunters and for commercial sale. Aboriginal harvesting rights are set out in land claim settlements, treaties and the laws of Canada and the NWT. These instruments also set out when and how limitations on Aboriginal harvesting may be implemented for conservation purposes. The impact of mineral exploration on barren-ground caribou ranges has been a concern since the 1970s. Until the early 1990s, caribou protection measures were implemented for two herds to reduce impacts to caribou during spring migration, calving and post-calving. Interest in the potential impacts of non-renewable resource development grew in the 1990s with a surge in mining activities on the Bathurst herd's range. Since then, two diamond mines have been built on spring migration and post calving/summer ranges and two diamond mines are under construction. The diamond mining companies monitor caribou abundance and behaviour in the vicinity of the diamond mines, however, uncertainties remain about the cumulative effects of the mines on the caribou. Monitoring agencies have been established for each diamond mine to supervise the monitoring programs and ensure that any impacts are detected early and appropriately mitigated. Concern about the potential impacts from oil and gas exploration and development has also increased in recent years. The proposed Mackenzie Gas Project proposes the development of gathering systems in proven gas reserves on caribou winter range. If approved, the Mackenzie Gas Project will induce additional exploration activities. Through the environmental assessment and regulatory review process, measures will be identified and implemented to monitor or mitigate impacts. [This report was sent to the Joint Panel Review by ENR as background information for the assessment of the Mackenzie Gas Project.] (Au)

Ebbutt Hills boreal caribou study progress report, February 2006   /   Larter, N.C.   Allaire, D.G.
Fort Simpson, N.W.T. : ENR (GNWT), 2006.
[8] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59108.
Languages: English
Web: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237563102_Ebbutt_Hills_Boreal_Caribou_Study_Progress_Report_February_2006

Background: In response to the new federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and following extensive consultations with the Liidlii Kue First Nations (LKFN) and Fort Simpson Métis Local (FSML) membership of Fort Simpson, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Dehcho Region, initiated an ecological study of boreal caribou in the Fort Simpson area during spring 2005 (Fig. 1). There was limited scientific knowledge about boreal caribou in the area and LKFN and FSML members saw the benefits of combining their own traditional knowledge of caribou in the area with the scientific information this study could provide. The study area included portions of the proposed Mackenzie Gas Pipeline route. The ecological study involved the deployment of satellite radio collars on female boreal caribou in order to document seasonal range use, seasonal movements, calving areas and calving time, fidelity of range use and seasonal movements over a 4-5 year period. Collared females would also be used to provide information on calf production, calf survival, and adult female survival. This study would be one of a number of ecological studies being conducted on boreal caribou in this and other regions of the Northwest Territories to increase our knowledge of boreal caribou so that in the face of increasing development pressures informed decisions regarding land use could be made. ... (Au)

Trout Lake boreal caribou study : progress report, February 2006   /   Larter, N.C.   Allaire, D.G.
Fort Simpson, N.W.T. : ENR (GNWT), 2006.
[11] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59109.
Languages: English
Web: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237763036_Trout_Lake_Boreal_Caribou_Study_Progress_Report_February_2005

Background: In response to the new federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) and following extensive consultation with the Sambaa K'e Dene Band (SKDB) membership of Trout Lake, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR), Dehcho Region initiated an ecological study of boreal caribou in the Trout Lake area during spring 2004. With limited scientific knowledge about boreal caribou in the area, SKDB saw the benefits of combining information from this study with their own traditional knowledge study to fill knowledge gaps in traditional information. Ten female boreal caribou were collared in the Celibeta Lake area (Fig. 1, area A) in order to document seasonal range use and movements, calving period and areas, and fidelity of seasonal range use and movements over a 4-5 year period. Collared females would also provide information on calf production, calf survival, and adult female survival (Larter and Allaire 2005). Other ecological studies of boreal caribou are being conducted in this and other regions of the Northwest Territories to increase our knowledge of boreal caribou so that in the face of increasing development pressures informed decisions regarding land use can be made. Because caribou collared in 2004 were not distributed throughout the Trout Lake traditional harvesting area (crusty snow conditions restricted caribou distribution), at the request of SKDB an additional 8 satellite collars were deployed on female boreal caribou in other areas to the north and east of Trout Lake in spring 2005 (Fig. 1, Area B). The information provided from animals in the Trainor Lake area could also be used by SKDB for their area of interest as a Protected Area. ... Boreal caribou continue to utilize areas of heavy and tall timber during the snow free seasons and when not in the heavily treed areas their pelage blends in well with the vegetation. The extreme difficulty in getting visual observations from fixed-wing aircraft necessitated extra relocation flights with rotary aircraft. Our data on calf production and calf survival through summer is still limited. Of 13 collared female caribou entering the calving season we know one was not pregnant based upon a blood test. Seven of the remaining 12 collared females (58%) had calves. Two of those 7 calves were lost before 23 September (71% survived till fall); one was lost in June. Based upon observations from the January 2006 capture operation we know that animals #116 and #117 still had calves at heel. The much greater success rate in getting visual observations during winter when groups are larger provides an opportunity to conduct aerial sex/age class counts of enough animals to estimate the ratio of calves to females present in late-winter. Our first class count is scheduled for March 2006. ... Although the Trout Lake study area is considered relatively pristine, the Dehcho Land Use Plan (DLUP) indicates a noticeable linear footprint on the landscape. Of the six predator related mortalities 2 occurred <100m from a linear feature, 2 occurred 300-350m from a linear feature, and 2 occurred 1.7-2.3km from a linear feature. The animal that died of old age died 200m from the nearest linear feature. These distances are all based upon the location of the collar in relation to the digital DLUP linear footprint. ... A number of collared caribou have died since we initiated this study. Of the 10 animals captured in March/April 2004, 5 have died (#'s 101, 102, 103, 104, and 107). Of the 8 animals captured in March 2005, 2 have died (#'s 110 and 113). There is strong evidence to suggest that all but one of the mortalities were caused by wolf predation. The remaining animal appears to have died of old age. Six of the 7 mortalities occurred between mid-April and mid-June. The majority of female mortalities in the Cameron Hills study area have also occurred during the pre-calving and calving period (D. Johnson pers. comm.). The other mortality occurred in September. (Au)

Are caribou important to you? Boreal caribou conservation in the Northwest Territories   /   Northwest Territories. Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : ENR (GNWT), 2006.
7 p. : ill., 1 map ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59111.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.reviewboard.ca/upload/project_document/EA0506-007_Boreal_Caribou_Booklet.pdf

Boreal caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) live in the boreal forest across much of northern Canada. They are a valuable economic and cultural resource to NWT residents as their meat is used for food and their hides are used for clothing and other crafts. Outside the NWT, declining numbers and habitat loss have meant that boreal caribou are no longer found in some areas where they used to live. Concern about boreal caribou in much of Canada led to their being listed as Threatened under the federal Species at Risk Action 2004. They are now protected on federal lands and a national Recovery Strategy is being developed to conserve and recover boreal caribou populations and their habitat across Canada. Under this national strategy, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources is developing an Action Plan for the conservation of boreal caribou in the NWT. In the NWT, boreal caribou are found in low numbers. They have a low reproductive rate, as cows do not usually calve until their third year. This makes boreal caribou particularly sensitive to human activities because even a small change in the rate of survival for adults could cause a population decline. We would like to hear your opinions on what we should do to make sure boreal caribou remain in the NWT for a very long time. Our goal is to give everyone interested in boreal caribou the opportunity to work together to maintain local populations of boreal caribou and their habitat. Although boreal caribou are not currently in danger of being eliminated from the NWT, they are vulnerable to human activities and we need to work together to make sure they don't disappear. (Au)

Resource development impacts : estimates of the cumulative impact of non-renewable resource development and the forced growth impact on government programs   /   Northwest Territories
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : GNWT, 2006.
21 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report date: January 2006.
ASTIS record 59114.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Government%20of%20the%20Northwest%20Territories/060202_GNWT_General_Submission_Impact_Report.pdf

... Background: The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of forecasts of impacts of resource development and to begin to describe the implications for government programs. The focus of the paper is on the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) and the incremental activity in oil and gas exploration activity, but also considers cumulative impacts of all development activity. The time period covered is from 2006/07 to 2014/15. A general review of resource impacts in the 2015 to 2030 period is also included. The paper examines incremental forced growth impacts on government expenditures should existing service levels be maintained. The paper is not a plan for future government expenditures, but rather a planning document to understand where pressures on expenditures are likely to exist. Available resources will be a major determinant of how [well] government is able to respond to these pressures. Forecasts of incremental revenue impacts are not included in this paper. There have been significant changes to the Territorial Financing Formula (TFF) between Canada and the Northwest Territories. Further [sic] an expert panel is currently reviewing the arrangements and until some certainty is known on the treatment of incremental revenue, it is not possible to forecast the impact of incremental revenues on GNWT operations. The forecast information provided in this report is the result of a project undertaken by the Bureau of Statistics and the Financial Management Board Secretariat (FMBS) to identify the cumulative impacts of a range of resource development projects that may occur in the NWT over the next 15 years. The purpose of the project is to develop information and tools that will assist the GNWT to anticipate and identify impacts of non-renewable resource development projects and to model the effect of these impacts on GNWT expenditures on programs and services. It is important to note that while all of the projects included in the forecasts are anticipated to proceed, these forecasts will need to be adjusted in the future as additional information becomes available, project timing changes, or additional development activity is identified. The projects included are in various stages of planning. It is possible that other developments could take place during this period, but are not at the point in the planning process to be included in the current forecasts. ... (Au)

Written submission for the Joint Review Panel's Inuvik general hearing on EIS methods, Feb. 21-23, 2006 [Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board]   /   Walker-Larsen, J.   Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board [Sponsor]
Inuvik, N.W.T. : Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board, 2006.
7 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59135.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Gwichin%20Renewable%20Resource%20Board/060210_GRRB_EIS_Methods_cover_letter_&_submission.pdf

GRRB Position: The Gwich'in Renewable Resource Board (GRRB) is of the opinion that there is considerable uncertainty associated with the predictions of the Mackenzie Gas Project's Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) concerning the impacts of the project to terrestrial wildlife. This uncertainty is particularly problematic for impact predictions involving important subsistence species, such as the Cape Bathurst and Bluenose barren-ground caribou herds (currently declining) woodland caribou (threatened status), and moose, and sensitive species such as grizzly bear (special concern status). This uncertainty results from the cumulative effects of error in the inputs to the wildlife habitat models, error in studies resulting from low sampling effort, and uncertainty about each species due to a lack of baseline information for local populations. (Au)

Town of Inuvik submission : Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel Hearings, 16 February 2006, Inuvik, NT, presented by Peter Clarkson, Mayor, Town of Inuvik   /   Inuvik (N.W.T.)
Inuvik, N.W.T. : Town of Inuvik, 2006.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59139.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Inuvik%20-%20Town%20of/060206_TOI_Feb16_WS.pdf

Town of Inuvik supports the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) because of the economic and employment opportunities that it will bring to Inuvik, the Beaufort Delta, and Mackenzie Valley. The MGP and associated development will also help provide long term sustainability and additional diversity to Inuvik's economy. The Town of Inuvik supports the MGP because of the long term benefits this project provides to the residents of Inuvik, aboriginal governments, businesses, and residents of the NWT. The Town recognizes that there are social and environmental impact concerns associated with the MGP. We encourage the MGP proponents, aboriginal governments, and territorial and federal governments, to work together and ensure these concerns are addressed to reduce or mitigate the potential impacts of the project. The Town of Inuvik as a municipal government is responsible for municipal services and infrastructure. Inuvik's location and infrastructure make it the logistical support centre for development in the natural gas production fields, gathering system, Inuvik area facility, northern end of the pipeline, and future exploration in the Beaufort Delta area. The Town's overall objective is to ensure high quality and affordable municipal infrastructure and services. The MGP should compensate the Town for any use of community infrastructure or services. As Inuvik is a tax-based municipality we do not want resident tax payers subsidizing the MGP or have reduced services to residents because of the Project. In the report below we will: a) outline what we have done to determine the potential impact to the municipality, b) identify the concerns the Town has with the MGP and municipal infrastructure, and c) make recommendations on how these concerns can be addressed. (Au)

K'ahsho Got'ine District Land Corporation Ltd [sic] : written presentation to the Joint Review Panel Mackenzie Gas Project, presented by Arthur Tobac, President, Fort Good Hope, NT ... April 11-12, 2006   /   K'ahsho Got'ine District Land Corporation Ltd.
Fort Good Hope, N.W.T. : K'ahsho Got'ine District Land Corporation, 2006.
21 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59140.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/K%20ahsho%20Got%20ine%20Lands%20Corporation%20Ltd/TobacA_Apr11-12_pres.pdf

The K'ahsho Got'ine District Land Corporation (hereafter called K'ahsho Got'ine) pipeline proposal calls on the MGP to make an annual payment to the Aboriginal land owners for the right to transmit their natural gas through Aboriginal territory. This approach was based on two fundamental principles namely (1) the inherent right of Aboriginal people to govern themselves and (2) that any meaningful form of Aboriginal government must have the power to tax the interest in or use of their lands in order to defray their costs of governing that land and its beneficiaries. In March 2005 the Parliament of Canada passed a new law entitled The First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act. The legislation further advances the right of Aboriginal governments in Canada to raise tax revenues to finance local undertakings. The K'ahsho Got'ine has been collaborating with the Indian Taxation Advisory Board and other NWT First Nations (Gwich'in, Sahtu and Dehcho) in an effort to ensure that the legislation has force and effect in the NWT. In 2005 the five Aboriginal regions along the pipeline right of way reached an important agreement with the Government of Canada and among themselves regarding the creation and sharing of a $500 million Socio-Economic Impacts Fund. In 2005 the K'ahsho Got'ine negotiated tentative access and benefits agreements with the MGP. However, those agreements were rejected by the beneficiary at a ratification vote. Summary of Recommendations: The K'ahsho Got'ine respectfully requests that the JRP: Recommendation #1: Invite the Indian Taxation Advisory Board, a duly constituted and highly regarded Canadian regulatory body to appear before your panel to discuss and answer questions about the history and future of Aboriginal government taxation, financing and management in Canada. Recommendation #2: The Joint Review Panel should recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with a provision that requires the Government of Canada to guarantee Aboriginal governments that the undertakings and obligations set out in the SEIF documents (including the $500 million) will be honored for as long as any CPCN remains in force and further that annual interim payments will be made during any period of deferral. Recommendation #3: The Joint Review Panel should recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should obligate the MGP to begin construction of their pipeline within three years otherwise the CPCN should lapse and becomes null and void. Recommendation #4: Recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with the provision that a Monitoring Agency be established and operated by the K'ahsho Got'ine and funded through the collection of a development charge levied on the MGP and its contractors. Recommendation #5: Recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with a provision that the MGP be required to compensate local K'ahsho Got'ine governments in such amounts so as to ensure they will not be fiscally disadvantaged as a result of the construction of the proposed pipeline. Recommendation #6: Recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with a provision directing the MGP and K'ahsho Got'ine to work cooperatively to establish and cost-share a Special Training and Employment Program to assist beneficiaries challenged by the commercial wage economy. Recommendation #7: Recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with a provision that the MGP is required to offer to the Aboriginal business community in the K'ahsho Got'ine contracts on the terms and conditions similar to those set out in the Benefits Agreement between Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited and K'ahsho Got'ine Land Corporation LTD., Yamoga Land Corporation, Fort Good Hope Metis Local #54 Land Corporation and Ayoni Keh Land Corporation dated January 9, 2006. Recommendation #8: Recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with a provision that the MGP and the K'ahsho Got'ine enter into an arrangement to establish a Joint Advisory Committee similar in terms of funding and purpose to the one set out in the Benefits Agreement between Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited and K'ahsho Got'ine Land Corporation LTD., Yamoga Land Corporation, Fort Good Hope Metis Local #54 Land Corporation and Ayoni Keh Land Corporation dated January 9, 2006. Recommendation #9: Recommend to the National Energy Board that the CPCN should be conditioned with a provision that the MGP should establish an Education Fund for K'ahsho Got'ine students wishing to continue their formal education at a post secondary institution with similar terms and conditions as the one set out in the Benefits Agreement between Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited and K'ahsho Got'ine Land Corporation LTD., Yamoga Land Corporation, Fort Good Hope Metis Local #54 Land Corporation and Ayoni Keh Land Corporation dated January 9, 2006. (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's written submission on the Mackenzie Gas Project environmental assessment review for the Joint Review Panel technical hearing. Theme 2 : physical environment - land, water and air; topic 3a : pipeline and gathering system routing and design, March 14-17, 2006, Inuvik   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
[Canada] : NRC, 2006.
12 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report date: February 27, 2006.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59143.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/060227_NRCan_tech_submission_Mar_14-17.pdf

... Summary: The EIS and pipeline and field development applications lacked sufficient, substantiated and referenced information for NRCan to adequately conduct a technical review of earthquakes and seismic hazards and associated environmental consequences. NRCan requested a seismic hazard assessment in information request 1.25. The Proponent indicated that this report was in preparation, and NRCan specifically requested a copy of this report in its information request 2.02. In October 2005, the Proponent provided NRCan with their "Seismic Hazard Assessment, Mackenzie Gas Project, Pipeline Route, Report" dated June 2005. NRCan reviewed this report, and the Proponent's responses to additional points raised in both the NRCan Round 1 and 2 IRs. NRCan considers that the report provides a comprehensive assessment of the seismic hazard to the pipeline project and substantively addresses many of NRCan's prior concerns about the inadequacy of the seismic hazard assessment in the EIS. However, NRCan had a few outstanding issues and requested clarification and additional information in a Round 3 IR and in a letter to the Proponent in January 2006. Subject to a satisfactory response to this letter and to the recommendations below, NRCan deems the seismic hazard assessment report a good basis for a project engineering design that minimizes the probability of pipeline rupture and its consequences due to earthquakes. 2.4.3 Recommendations to the JRP: With respect to seismic hazard assessment, NRCan recommends that the Proponent provide NRCan and the appropriate regulators for review prior to final engineering design: a written response to the points raised in NRCan's detailed review of the MGP proponent's Seismic Hazard Assessment Report; an accident and malfunction plan that includes post-earthquake response activities, should an earthquake strongly shake the project causing pipe breakage and/or compressor station damage and/or interrupt control/monitoring activities; a reportthat addresses issues of fault displacement (with or without earthquakes) in the region above and immediately surrounding the production zones that might result from hydrocarbon withdrawal, including how big "minor" movements in bedrock may be, what hazard shaking they might pose, and what has been the experience at other western gas fields; and, an assessment of the impacts of seismically triggered landslides, based on the ground motions given in their Seismic Hazard Assessment Report. NRCan wishes to ensure that the ground motions at the appropriate probability for the performance are being used. NRCan understands that this assessment will be part of the proponent's slope stability engineering assessment report promised in Q4 2005. The Proponent has collected field data that indicates the presence of massive ice. It is not clear how or if this information, or other field data to be collected in support of engineering design, will be incorporated into an updated impact analysis and mitigation plans. 2.13.2 Summary: The Proponent has not adequately characterized the ground ice conditions, in particular they have not adequately considered the documented occurrence of massive ice in their environmental impact assessment of the gathering system. Impacts on ground stability, drainage, borrow source selection and granular estimates, related to the gathering system and associated facilities in the Mackenzie Delta region may therefore be more extensive than the Proponent has concluded. 2.13.3 Recommendations to JRP: 1. With respect to the gathering system, NRCan recommends that the Proponent provide to NRCan and the appropriate regulators for review, prior to ROW clearing and/or construction: a re-assessment of the characterization of ground ice conditions, including delineation of massive ground ice occurrence at the gathering system facilities and along the gathering system route, fully utilizing published data (such as those referenced above in NRCan's analysis) as we ll as any additional field data collected by the Proponent prior to ROW clearing based on the above re-assessment, an update of their ground stability and drainage impact assessments incorporating the updated baseline information on ground ice conditions including massive ice. 2. NRCan recommends that the Proponent provide to NRCan and appropriate regulators for review and approval prior to construction, the results of their proposed field investigations (including geophysical investigations) to delineate massive ice along the gathering system route and at associated facilities. This information, as well as the results of the re-assessments recommended in point 1) above should be incorporated into environmental management and mitigation plans provided by the Proponent to the regulators. (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's written submission on the Mackenzie Gas Project environmental assessment review for the Joint Review Panel technical hearing. Theme 2 : physical environment - land, water and air; topic 3b : anchor field design, March 20-22, 2006, Inuvik   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
[Canada] : NRC, 2006.
41 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report date: March 3, 2006.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Appendix A to this report does not include the contents of the appendix, only the title page for the appendix. ASTIS record 59146 describes the contents of the appendix.
ASTIS record 59144.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/060303_Attachment_3_to_NRCan_letter_dated_3_Mar_06.pdf

Introduction: Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is a registered intervener in the Joint Review Panel (JRP) environmental assessment (EA) review of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). NRCan is participating in the JRP review as a department with expertise relevant to the project. NRCan has no regulatory role with respect to the MGP EA process. On January 17, 2006, NRCan filed its Summary Submission for the MGP EA review. This document outlined the general context for NRCan's review: the NRCan mandate, role in the MGP and participation in the JRP process. As well it provided the summary and recommendations for each of the technical topics reviewed by NRCan, indicating that the details of the NRCan technical would be forthcoming. The current submission provides NRCan's more detailed submission on topics that will be addressed during the March 20-22, 2006 JRP technical hearings on Theme 2: Physical Environment - Land, Water and Air - Topic 3b Anchor Field Design. In particular this NRCan submission, prepared by experts from the Earth Science Sector, addresses the: 1) Gas Hydrates, Permafrost and Geotechnical Design Issues Pertaining to Anchor Field Development (section 2.6, NRCan Summary Submission); 2) Permafrost and Terrain Characterization - Implications for Well Casing Design (section 2.7, NRCan Summary Submission); 3) Subsidence due to Hydrocarbon Extraction - Impacts on Flooding at Taglu and Niglintgak (Section 2.8, NRCan Summary Submission); 4) Mackenzie Delta Storm Surges, Flooding, Subsidence and Design Elevations - Vertical Datums and Design Elevations (section 2.9, NRCan Summary Submission); 5) Niglintgak Remote Sump - Disposal of Drilling Waste, Long Term Integrity and Environmental Impacts (Section 2.10, NRCan Summary Submission); 6) Barge Based Gas Conditioning Facility, Niglintgak (section 2.11, NRCan Summary Submission): a. Integrity of Barge-Based Gas Conditioning Processing Facility - Ice Movements; b. Bathymetry in Barge Routes, Marine Sediment Distribution, Dredging Impact: Sediment Grain Size - Validation of Hydroacoustics; c. Dredging for Barge-Based Facility: Bed and Bank Disturbance, during both the Commissioning and Decommissioning Stages; 7) Impacts on Permafrost Terrain in the Production Area - Design of Well Pads (section 2.12, NRCan Summary Submission); 8) Climate Change Effects on Project Design - Sea Level Rise, Frequency and Elevation of Flooding in Anchor Fields (section 2.19.3, NRCan Summary Submission). ... The principal contributors that will be presenting at the 3 upcoming March 20-22 technical hearings are well known and respected in their respective disciplines, and experienced in the review of environmental assessments of large northern development projects. Their analyses and reviews are based on material filed and reviewed by NRCan to February 19, 2006. The format for NRCan's detailed technical review comments is generally as follows, for each topic: a brief introductory statement of the geoscience topic/issue and potential related environmental impact; NRCan's review/analysis, fully referenced to the relevant EIS and supporting/supplemental documents, to the Information Requests (IRs), and to the Proponent's responses, as well to any additional information received through workshops or meetings with the Proponent; Summary; Recommendations to the JRP; References. (Au)

Summary of the analysis of submergence related to predicted hydrocarbon-induced subsidence at the Taglu and Niglintgak anchor fields : draft NRCan report submitted as appendix A of NRCan's March 3, 2006 submission to the MGP Joint Review Panel for the March 20-33, 2006 MGP JRP technical hearings   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
[Canada] : NRC, 2006.
22 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Cover title.
References.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
This report was submitted as appendix A to the report described in ASTIS record 59144, NRCan's written submission for the March 20-22 MGP JPR technical hearing in Inuvik.
ASTIS record 59146.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/060303_Attachment_1_to_NRCan_letter_dated_3_Mar_06.pdf

... Hydrocarbon extraction at the Taglu and Niglintgak anchor fields is predicted to cause subsidence of the land overlying the fields. Under certain circumstances the reduction in elevation could result in submergence of the lands beneath existing water bodies or the creation of new water bodies. The Proponents' analysis indicated that there would be no new water bodies created and that advancement of the southern shore of Big Lake to the south could increase the frequency of replenishment of the lake (MGP EA volume 5B, Section 5 - Hydrology, pg 153). They did not discuss submergence due to subsidence, nor attempt to estimate the extent of the subsidence. The Proponents acknowledged that changes in the frequency of flooding were possible, but since the land was already flood prone, the significance of the changes was considered to be "low to moderate". Please see the comments contained in the Proponents' round 2 IR response: "JRP NRCAN R2.pdf". NRCan and EC were not satisfied with the technical documentation supplied by the Proponents in support of their conclusions and requested that the Proponents supply the data that were used to reach them. Based on that data (and other independently collected information) NRCan has conducted an analysis and come to a different conclusion about the potential for submergence as a result of subsidence. The independent analysis suggests that a minimum of 230 hectares of land that was previously above the water level at Big Lake will be submerged as a result of hydrocarbon-induced subsidence. 3.0 NRCan approach: The analysis of submergence induced by subsidence is based on: 1. present land elevations (LiDAR); 2. predicted subsidence (Models); 3. future land elevations are calculated by subtracting predicted subsidence from the present land elevations; 4. present water levels of water bodies adjacent to subsiding lands; 5. future water level of water bodies adjacent to subsiding lands. ... 4.5 Conclusions and recommendations - Taglu anchor field: 1. Water levels at Big Lake are controlled by land and channel bed elevations at the north end of the lake and are therefore uncoupled from ocean and river levels except during floods and surges. 2. Natural rates of expansion of Big Lake appear to be related to NW storm winds and have resulted in a mean rate of 3 hectares per year from 1950-2004. 3. The 2003 water level calculated from LiDAR hits on the water surface is 0.41 m. This elevation is the only direct measurement of the elevation of water levels at Big Lake, but we do not know how it compares to the long-term mean late summer, early fall water level. 4. Hydrocarbon-induced subsidence will lower the land surface in areas adjacent to Big Lake to elevations that are lower than the 2003 LiDAR water level of the lake. This will result in submergence of a minimum of 232 hectares within the KIBS over the 30 years of production. This represents a rate of 7.7 hectares per year. Some additional submergence in areas where elevation data is missing or has not been collected is likely. 5. No submergence estimates were provided by the Proponents. The submergence estimates produced in the NRCAN analysis are based on a single water level calculation from LiDAR data collected on Sept. 2, 2003. The mean water level of Big Lake is not known. It may be possible to get an estimate of its elevation by surveying the mean elevation at the northern extent of the main drainage channel of the lake. Measuring the water levels in Big Lake for at least one full open water season would provide additional information, but a single year of data cannot provide an estimate of the long-term mean. A program of water level measurements, high resolution satellite image acquisition and ground surveys could provide better baseline measurements of the relations between water level and submergence under natural conditions. 6. Estimates of the area submerged at a range of water levels representative of different times of year should be calculated so that regulators understand the potential range of impacts and the levels of uncertainty involved. The range of water levels for analysis should reflect our understanding of the potential natural variability of the lake level. High water levels associated with extreme storm surges can be estimated from ponded water extent based on Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery. Low water levels could be estimated based on potential water balance calculations as deviations from the estimated LiDAR water level in 2003. Surveys of the elevation of the water level at the northern end of the lake drainage based on the position of the water level from air photos from 2000 and 2004 and from high resolution satellite imagery would provide additional data points for helping to estimate interannual water variations. ... At Niglintgak, the water levels of the channels adjacent to the subsiding land areas control the extent of submergence in this location. This is in contrast to Taglu, where the water levels at Big Lake, which are decoupled from the river and ocean levels, control the extent of submergence. As such, the water levels at the time of the LiDAR survey at Niglintgak need to be examined. According to the survey report, the surveys started at 330063 GPS seconds and ended at 338027 seconds during GPS week 1234. This corresponds to September 3, 2003 from 1941h to 2154h GMT. GPS time was transformed to GMT date and time by the Geodetic Survey of Canada. ... 5.4 Conclusions and recommendations - Niglintgak Anchor Field: 1. Water levels in channels adjacent to areas of predicted subsidence control the extent and magnitude of submergence. 2. A small surge at the time of the LiDAR survey likely raised water levels at the site above the long-term monthly average water level by approximately 0.3 m. 3. Based on a mean July/August water level (from WSC10LC019) of 0.2 m, we calculate that a maximum of 25-30 hectares of land will be submerged due to subsidence. More extensive submergence is expected at the higher water levels in June or due to storm surges. Estimates of the area submerged at a range of water levels (representative of different times of year and therefore of waterfowl activity) should be calculated for pre- and postsubsidence conditions so that Regulators understand the potential range of impacts and the levels of uncertainty involved. 4. The shoreline used as a baseline for estimation of submergence is based on a low water air photo, so the calculated submergence is over-estimated. More accurate assessment of the extent of submergence would require capturing a shoreline from an image obtained at mean water level. Video imagery acquired at the time of the LiDAR survey (undertaken during a small storm surge) could assist in estimating potential over-estimation. ... (Au)

Town of Norman Wells submission to the Joint Review Panel for the Mackenzie Gas Project, April 7, 2006, Norman Wells, NT   /   Norman Wells (N.W.T.)
Norman Wells, N.W.T. : Town of Norman Wells, 2006.
[9] p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
References.
ASTIS record 59152.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Norman%20Wells%20-%20Town%20of/Norman%20Wells%20Written%20Submission%20-%207%20April%202006.pdf

Introduction: The Town of Norman Wells supports the Mackenzie Gas Project. Approval of the project will result in continued prosperity for Norman Wells through employment and economic opportunities, further resource exploration and development, a continued supply of natural gas to the community and the extension of IORL's current operation at Norman Wells. Unlike other communities along the Mackenzie River that were established as hunting/fishing camps or trading posts, Norman Wells developed around crude oil production and transportation. As a result of resource development in Norman Wells, residents enjoy a high employment rate, a high standard of living and access to services and benefits unavailable in many other northern communities. The direct and indirect employment created by resource development and related business opportunities have established Norman Wells as one of the highest income communities per capita in Canada. As a municipal government, the Town of Norman Wells is committed to providing quality municipal services and infrastructure in a cost-effective and efficient manner. It is essential the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project be managed in a manner that will prevent negative socioeconomic impacts to our community. Any reduction in the quality and availability of services to our residents, any deterioration of our infrastructure or any increased financial requirements to the municipality and its residents as a result of the project will not be acceptable. The Town expects the project proponents to work cooperatively with them and to provide sufficient compensation to manage impacts related to project construction and development activities. ... Recommendations: -That all required quarry material for construction of the pipeline and facilities located within Norman Wells be purchased from the Town and that no new quarries be established within the Block Land Transfer. -That camp and pipe storage sites be established adjacent to the Town Industrial Park and not within the Town Quarry boundaries. -That Norman Wells be given the opportunity to identify and acquire camp components, infrastructure and/or related equipment upon completion of construction. -That the proponent assists the Town with planning for the proper disposal of waste generated by support service entities. -That the proponent be prepared to compensate the Town for the increased enforcement required to ensure public safety and adherence to municipal by-laws. -That the proponent executes a “Road Use Agreement” with the Town of Norman Wells. -That the proponent ensures minimal disruption to the community's use of marine and air services. -That the pipeline Right of Way be restricted to 40 meters within the Town boundaries. -That the proponent works with the Town to develop “controlled community access” protocols for camp residents to provide local business with increased revenue opportunities. -That a Mitigation Group be established to ensure timely and effective communication. -That the proponent executes a Community Development Impact Agreement with the Town of Norman Wells. (Au)

Intervention to the Joint Review Panel on the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project, January 2006 [Parks Canada]   /   Parks Canada
Calgary, Alta. : Parks Canada, 2006.
6 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
ASTIS record 59154.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Parks%20Canada/060113_Parks_Canada_Cover_letter_&_Submission.pdf

Parks Canada is providing this intervention on the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) to the Joint Review Panel (JRP). Comments are intended to assist the JRP in its examination of the proposed development, drafting a report and making recommendations about the proposed project. The analysis and recommendations in this intervention are based on all material available by November 18, 2005. Parks Canada may choose to modify this intervention or recommendations based on new information or analysis filed by the proponent from that point forward. Also, Parks Canada may elaborate on the recommendations provided in this intervention in future interventions. On behalf of the people of Canada, Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these areas are maintained present and future generations. Therefore, Parks Canada's intervention is focused on the potential impacts of the proposed project on national parks and national historic sites. Parks Canada's intervention addresses three issues: 1. Potential impacts of shipping on Ivvavik National Park of Canada; 2. Potential impacts to Nagwichoonjik National Historic Site of Canada; and 3. Potential cumulative impacts on national parks in the area. ... Summary of Recommendations: 1) Parks Canada recommends anchoring off the coast of Ivvavik National Park of Canada outside of visitor season or choosing a different location to anchor. 2) Parks Canada recommends that Nagwichoonjik National Historic Site of Canada be added to the list of sites of particular value when planning for accidents involving barges. 3) Parks Canada recommends: a. The proponent avoid the use of borrow pit 5.013P to protect the cultural landscape of Nagwichoonjik National Historic Site of Canada, or b. If unavoidable, construct the borrow pit so as to not be visible from the Mackenzie River or the national historic site. 4) Parks Canada recommends that the proponent contribute to the ongoing implementation of the actions identified in "A Blueprint for Implementing the Cumulative Effects Assessment and Management Framework in the NWT and its Regions". Specifically, this should include providing information collected during the design, construction, operations, and planning phases of the project to the identified leads in implementation of Blueprint Actions. In addition, baseline and monitoring information should be compatible with the "NWT Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program 5-Year Workplan and Budget". (Au)

World Wildlife Fund Canada intervention (with colour maps) to the Joint Review Panel for the Mackenzie Gas Project   /   World Wildlife Fund (Canada)
Toronto : WWF, 2006.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Cover title.
Report provided for posting on the Joint Review Panel's public registry for intervenors in the Mackenzie Gas Project assessment.
Report date: February 10, 2006.
Appendices.
ASTIS record 59163.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/World%20Wildlife%20Fund%20-%20Canada/060210_WWF_cov_letter_&_written_intervention.pdf

Executive Summary: World Wildlife Fund is one of the largest independent conservation organizations in the world, with projects in over 100 countries. ... WWF is not an anti-development, anti-hunting, anti-trapping or anti-sealing organisation. Our work focuses on getting the balance right in long-term, truly 'sustainable' solutions that will benefit future generations of people and wildlife, and the vital natural systems upon which we all depend. In Canada WWF has worked for over 30 years in support of northern community-based conservation initiatives. We remain a strong partner, with regional Aboriginal organisations, governments, industry and other NGOs in the community-based NWT Protected Areas Strategy (PAS). We believe that the PAS Action Plan to 2009 should be fully implemented in 16 key ecoregions of the NWT's Mackenzie Valley in order to protect a full and representative network of special cultural and ecological areas for the future, while the opportunity still remains intact. WWF's aim in intervening in the JRP and NEB Hearings on the Mackenzie Gas Project is to provide helpful information and viewpoints based on our substantial global and regional experience in such matters. We believe this will help ensure that any final decisions and conditions to proceed in this new Century of northern development satisfactorily reflect the long-term societal needs to properly balance and sequence conservation values with industrial development values. Based on all past experience in relevant situations, and all credible projections for energy supply and demand in the North American continent and beyond, it is inevitable that a basin-opening MGP gas pipeline corridor will induce very significant accelerated industrial activities in the broad region, likely for the remainder of the 21st Century. Therefore, it is vital that a comprehensive and thorough Strategic Environmental Assessment be completed for the region, and that the JRP use state-of-the-art approaches to cumulative impacts assessment for the inevitable induced development in the region. The most comprehensive and thorough review of multi-decadal impacts (both positive and negative, short-term and cumulative) of a newly opening petrochemical basin is that from the Alaskan North Slope in the latter part of the 20th Century - involving situations that are very comparable to those in the NWT at this stage of the proposed MGP initiative. The approaches taken by, and lessons learned from this U.S. Congress initiated review ... are summarised in this WWF intervention .... WWF makes nine recommendations to the Joint Review Panel, in the hope that these will be helpful in your work over the coming months, and in completing your final report to the National Energy Board. These recommendations are: 1. That the Cumulative Effects Assessment and Management (CEAM) Strategy and Framework, and Blueprint Actions be utilised and resourced fully, with strong engagement from industry including the MGP Proponents, to develop and implement a suite of effective mitigation measures. 2. That well-balanced, long-term land use plans be completed and approved for the Sahtu and Dehcho regions in the NWT prior to any major decisions on the MGP, or associated development projects affecting these regions. 3. That in order to satisfactorily meet conservation commitments made in the NWT, especially in the 16 ecoregions directly or indirectly intersected by the proposed MGP pipeline, no new allocations to industrial exploration or development access be granted until habitat conservation measures such as the interim protection of a network of culturally and ecologically significant areas (essentially VECs using the EIS terminology) be completed. 4. That the five-year NWT Protected Areas Strategy (PAS) Action Plan be fully implemented by 2010, meeting commitments made by all PAS partners and the federal and territorial government responsible Ministers to reserve an adequate and representative network of special cultural and ecological areas in the 16 Mackenzie Valley ecoregions identified by the Action Plan and recognised by the Joint Review Panel and other key government agencies. 5. That an adequate network of large natural areas free from regional/local industrial activity and impacts be available as benchmark reference areas in comparable ecoregions, from which to satisfactorily monitor and assess any environmental impacts attributed to the MGP pipeline and future induced industrial activity. 6. That a robust network of protected areas be established as anchor areas of high conservation value before any further industrial allocations or major decisions are made, in order that ecosystem resilience to the stresses and uncertainties resulting from rapid climatic change be maximised. 7. That a well-resourced and sustained, transparent environmental monitoring regime be put in place upon any MGP approvals, along with sufficient posted bonds from the MGP Proponents and subsequently induced development projects in the region, to ensure that ecosystem impacts are both detected and then promptly and satisfactorily addressed by development project partners, and not by the general public at some later date. 8. That the federal government integrate into the NEB, JRP and Board approvals processes for the Mackenzie Valley a full Strategic Environmental Assessment approach before finalising any approvals of the basin-opening MGP, consistent with the 1999 cabinet directive on SEA. 9. That a final public interest decision be made on the basin-opening MGP proposal in the context of a progressive, robust, specific, clear and effective national and/or continental sustainable energy strategy. Development of the Canadian sustainable energy strategy should be initiated immediately. ... Conclusions: WWF believes that the work of the Joint Review Panel in assessing the anticipated impacts of this basin-opening MGP proposal is central to Canada being able to build a well-balanced future for northerners and the ecosystems upon which we all depend. Based on WWF's experience on similar 'frontier' hydrocarbon development projects around the world, it is clear that if constructed the MGP will quickly induce accelerating industrial activity in the broader region that will probably continue for the rest of this Century. There will be many positive impacts from this cumulative development, but also some significant adverse impacts. The successful management and mitigation of impacts is WWF's overall concern in intervening here. WWF strongly supports the wishes of many northerners today that they derive benefits from proceeding with economic development, but not at any cost. ... (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review - Joint Review Panel : Environment Canada summary overview of written evidence, appendix A : Environment Canada's mandate, role and responsibilities   /   Canada. Environment Canada
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Environment Canada, 2006.
20, [10] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Partial contents: Also attached are a cover letter and PowerPoint presentation to the Joint Review Panel, and biographical notes on the regional director general of the Prairie and Northern Region, Jim Vollmershausen.
Cover title.
Submission dated: February 7, 2006.
Prairie and Northern Region of Environment Canada file 4664-1.
ASTIS record 59229.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Environment%20Canada/060209_EC_Cover_Letter_and_attachments_to_%20JRP.pdf

Environment Canada is pleased to provide to the Joint Review Panel a copy of a report entitled: Summary Overview of Written Evidence for the Mackenzie Gas Project Appendix A: Environment Canada's Mandate, Role and Responsibilities. This report is intended to complement the overview submission submitted to the Joint Review Panel on January 18, 2006. The Appendix outlines the Department's mandate as it relates to all Environment Canada submissions which will be filed with the JRP between January and November 2006. It also serves as a follow-up to my previous letter of May 5, 2005 responding to the March 30, 2005 JRP IR to the Government of Canada regarding Departmental policies and programs relevant to the MGP. ... Introduction: The mandate of Environment Canada is determined by the statutes and regulations assigned to it by Parliament through the Minister. In delivering this mandate, the Department is also responsible for the development and implementation of policies, guidelines, codes of practice, inter-jurisdictional and international agreements and related programs. The following describes specific relevant legislation and national environmental policies and programs administered or adhered to by Environment Canada relevant to the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). This information is up-to-date as of November 18, 2005. Environment Canada will provide updates to the JRP as appropriate should significant changes to any of the documents referred to herein take place over the length of the hearing process. The following summaries have been prepared for ease of reference and convenience only. For purposes of reliability and accuracy, and for interpreting and applying the Act, regulation or policy, it is recommended that the reader review the original document itself, including any subsequent amendments. To that end, Environment Canada has provided some of the relevant websites so that the reader can obtain the document(s) and any recent amendments or updates. ... (Au)

Comments on Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited report [entitled] Gender analysis of the effects of the Mackenzie Gas Project : [submitted April 10, 2006, by the Status of Women Council of the N.W.T. to the Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review Joint Review Panel]   /   Status of Women Council of the N.W.T.
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Status of Women Council of the N.W.T., 2006.
10 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Report date: April 10, 2006.
ASTIS record 59232.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Other%20Hearing%20Participants/060424_SWC_to_JRP_IORVL_Gen_Anal_rep.pdf

... Summary and recommendations: Although the Proponents have standard corporate gender equity policies, there is little concrete evidence that gender equity would be well-integrated in the implementation of the MGP if it proceeds. Overall there is an absence of detailed strategies for addressing the concerns of women. The GA report does however provide valuable gender differentiated baseline statistical information, particularly in the areas of education and employment. Although the analysis and assessment of project effects regarding community well-being contains discussion of some gender-specific effects, it has missed a number of areas of great importance to women. The management methods proposed for community wellbeing show only very limited contribution by the Proponents to mitigating very complex potential adverse effects, which will impact most on women and their children. The analysis regarding the training and employment of women in trades, technology and operations has improved and offers some good management ideas, however a much more detailed management plan and strategy must be provided. The production of traditional clothing should be included as an indicator of traditional culture. Proposed monitoring will involve consultation with women, but to what extent? Equal participation by women on monitoring committees is needed, along with support for women's participation in monitoring and effects management at the community level. Based on our review of the GA report, we do not think that the Proponents have responded to the Joint Review Panel's Information Request 2.46 in sufficient detail, particularly IR2.46 section b), iii through viii. Our overriding concern is that gender equity has not been identified as a principle and goal within the Mackenzie Gas Project. This results in a narrow and inadequate assessment of potential project effects on women, limited mitigation, and underestimation of the significance of residual project effects. "Adequate gender analysis demands more than disaggregation of statistics .... It requires real strategic thinking directed toward the accomplishment of real goals and outcomes." In order to strengthen gender equity within the proposed MGP, we recommend that: 1. The Proponents put mechanisms in place to ensure a gender equity approach, including: a stated commitment to gender equity as a principle and goal within the MGP, including commitments to be signed by future contractors and subcontractors; a detailed gender equity plan, to be overseen by a gender equity committee that meets several times a year with strong participation by community women and women's organizations; regular monitoring by designated staff and reporting to the committee, and an annual committee report; equal representation of women on monitoring committees; regular meetings with community women and women's groups so that they can contribute to the management and monitoring of project effects. Aboriginal and other women's groups should also be provided with the financial resources to help community women organize in order to participate in socio-economic monitoring and qualitative measurement in communities. 2. The Proponents (and their contractors) should present a detailed plan for the training, recruitment, employment and retention of women in trades, technical and operations positions, and to address barriers to women's participation, including lack of child care. 3. The Proponents should present a detailed plan to address the social impacts of project related effects, including measures such as an employee and family assistance plan; counseling services in camps and in the community; and support for enhanced community front-line services. 4. The Proponents should ensure women are equally involved in all aspects of planning for socio-economic management, such as the delivery of training workshops and the development of camp policies and regulations, worksite practices and support programs. 5. The Proponents should develop a plan for gender-based approaches to monitoring socio-economic effects and physical environment effects on human health. 6. The Proponents should commit the financial resources needed to implement the above plans. In closing, while the Proponents are of course not responsible for gender inequities in society, they can take a position to be part of the solution by making gender equity a goal within the MGP and an overarching principle of the project, and by committing to specific implementation plans. This paper has presented comments from the Status of Women Council regarding the Proponents' Gender Analysis report. It is our intention to make specific presentations and recommendations to the Joint Review Panel on Community Well-Being and Traditional Culture, and on Training, Employment and Procurement, during General hearings of the Panel later this year. (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project greenhouse gas analysis - an update   /   Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development   Moorhouse, J.   McCulloch, M.   Powell, G.   Francis, E.   Ecology North [Sponsor]   Sierra Club of Canada [Sponsor]
Drayton Valley, Alta. : Pembina Institute, 2006.
36, [7] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: June 2006.
Presented by Ecology North to the Joint Review Panel as evidence relating to Mackenzie Gas Project review.
ASTIS record 64390.
Languages: English
Web: https://docs2.neb-one.gc.ca/ll-eng/llisapi.dll/fetch/2000/90464/90550/338535/338661/343078/345969/432403/SCC-18C_--_A0W2H2_-_MGP_Greenhouse_Gas_Analysis_-_An_Update.pdf?nodeid=432243&vernum=-2

This report was prepared for and resourced by Ecology North and the Sierra Club of Canada. This report expands on the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios developed in the "Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculations for the Mackenzie Gas Project" report produced by The Pembina Institute in May 2005 [described by ASTIS record 59084]. The May 2005 report provided an initial estimate of the potential GHGs associated with the operation of the Mackenzie Gas Project. The primary purpose of this report is to further develop the full extent of potential GHGs associated with the operation of the Mackenzie Gas Project and to reply to questions that arose from the first report. The main objectives of this report are to: [1] Develop a basic annual and total life-of-the-project GHG emissions estimate based on different scenarios for conveying gas through the MGP and estimate the contribution of the emissions to Canada's and the Northwest Territories' total emissions. [2] Estimate the GHG emissions associated with the end use of the natural gas conveyed via the MGP. [3] Contextualize projected increases in GHG emissions resulting from the operation of the MGP. [4] Describe possible options to reduce or offset GHG emissions from the operation of the pipeline. This report provides information updated since the May 2005 report. Specifically: [1] The potential GHG emissions estimates have been revised based on new information obtained from the Joint Review Panel. [2] GHG emissions associated with well testing have been added. [3] GHG emissions associated with blowdown venting have been added. [4] GHG emissions associated with inlet compression have been accounted for (included in revised operations emissions). [5] A sixth possible scenario has been added. ... Result 1: Six different scenarios were considered in this report. The EIS scenario, with 48 Mt CO2eq upstream cumulative emissions, would represent an increase of 44% over the cumulative 'business as usual' GHG emissions in the NWT between 2006 and 2053. The most aggressive scenario, the Sproule Scenario, would have 183 Mt CO2eq upstream emissions and would represent an increase of 167% over the cumulative 'business as usual' GHG emissions in the NWT between 2006 and 2053. The other four scenarios, Onshore Only, NEB P50, Onshore & Offshore and the Maximum Capacity scenario all fall between these extremes in this order. ... Result 2: To determine the emissions related to the operation of the MGP and downstream uses of the gas, it was assumed that all the gas would be combusted. In this case the combined GHG emissions are directly related to the quantity of natural gas being produced. Therefore, the scenarios are ranked in order of descending GHG emissions: Sproule Scenario, Maximum Capacity scenario, Onshore & Offshore, NEB P50, and Onshore Only. The total upstream and downstream cumulative GHG emissions range from 416,000 kt CO2eq/yr under the EIS scenario to 2,592,000 kt CO2eq/yr under the Sproule scenario. It was also determined that the demands of oil sands operations would always exceed the amount of additional natural gas conveyed via the MGP. It is therefore possible for all the natural gas from the MGP to be used by oil sands projects. ... Result 3: The peak annual GHG emissions generated by operating the MGP are expected to be equivalent to the GHG emissions from between 400,000 and 800,000 light vehicles operating yearly, representing between 2 and 5% of all light vehicles registered in Canada. When downstream emissions are included, the total emissions are equivalent to the emissions from between 5.5 and 8.4 million light vehicles operating yearly, representing 31 to 48% of all light vehicles registered in Canada. ... Result 4: Possible options for reducing or offsetting GHG emissions generated by operating the MGP include using efficient technologies for combustion, flaring, venting, and preventing leaks; purchasing GHG offsets through the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Develo pment Mechanism; purchasing domestic agriculture-based GHG offsets; establishing internal corporate GHG emissions trading system; and investing in GHG reduction offset projects. ... (Au)

Report on Canada's aboriginal consultation activities for the Mackenzie Gas Project, submitted to the National Energy Board, September 8, 2006 [volume I and volume II-appendices]   /   Canada
Edmonton, Alta. : Dept. of Justice, Prairie Division, 2006.
2 v. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
Appendices (volume II).
References.
Submitted on behalf of the Government of Canada by James N. Shaw, General Counsel, Civil Litigation and Advisory Services, Prairie Region, Justice Canada.
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69563 describes the Updated report on Canada's aboriginal consultation activities for the Mackenzie Gas Project, from August 10, 2006 to December 31, 2009.
ASTIS record 69122.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/428481
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/Item/View/428687
Libraries: ACU

... The purpose of this report is to provide evidence of the Government of Canada's (Canada) activities to August 9, 2006 in respect of consultations with Aboriginal groups who believe their Aboriginal and treaty rights protected by s. 35 of the "Constitution Act, 1982" may be adversely affected by the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). The report provides information about the Aboriginal groups contacted, concerns expressed by those groups and the "next steps" Canada intends to take in the ongoing consultations with Aboriginal groups. The application for the MGP has been made by a consortium of Imperial Oil Resources Ventures Limited, Conoco Phillips Canada (North) Limited, Shell Canada Limited, ExxonMobil Canada Properties and the Mackenzie Valley Aboriginal Pipeline Limited Partnership (the Proponent). The Inuvialuit, Gwich'in, and Sahtu Aboriginal groups each have an interest in the Mackenzie Valley Aboriginal Pipeline Limited Partnership (MV APL). In October 2004, the Proponent filed an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) with the Joint Review Panel (JRP) and, an application with the National Energy Board (NEB) to obtain regulatory approval for the MGP. ... On November 24, 2004 the NEB issued Hearing Order GH-1-2004 which outlines details of the technical review that would be conducted and the public hearings that would be held to obtain evidence, including traditional knowledge, and views from interested persons on the MGP. One of the issues the NEB identified for consideration was "the appropriateness of the Applicant's public consultation program; including the adequacy of aboriginal consultation". On December 20, 2005, the NEB directed "all intervenors, including the Government of Canada, will have until noon MT 8 September 2006 to file and serve their evidence on the adequacy of Aboriginal consultation" (Issue 8 of Hearing Order GH-1-2004 as amended). The Government of Canada (Canada) has intervened before the NEB for the purpose of providing evidence to the NEB on the Crown's consultation activities with Aboriginal groups in respect of the proposed MGP. Canada is consulting with Aboriginal groups about potential impacts on established or asserted Aboriginal rights as a consequence of federal decision making in the context of the MGP. Canada has identified that the government will be making decisions in the context of the response to the Joint Review Panel recommendations, the decision of the NEB, and in relation to its specific permitting activities. This report relates to Canada's consultation activities to August 8, 2006 and consists of the following: [1] description of how Canada has undertaken consultations; [2] the next steps anticipated to be taken; [3] a discussion relating to the Aboriginal groups consulted and the concerns expressed by them; [4] tables that provide details of the consultations and activities conducted to date, the concerns expressed and any recommendations made by Aboriginal groups to Canada. ... (Au)

The Mackenzie Gas Project : a financial and economic assessment, revised November, 2006   /   Pacific Analytics Inc.   Alternatives North [Sponsor]
Victoria, B.C. : Pacific Analytics Inc., 2006.
v, 28, A1-A3, B1-B3, C1-C4 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
Appendices.
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
ASTIS record 69124.
Languages: English
Web: https://docs2.neb-one.gc.ca/ll-eng/llisapi.dll/fetch/2000/90464/90550/338535/338661/343078/346163/443382/CRA-16B_--_A0X0S1_-_A_Financial_and_Economic_Assessment_-_REVISED_Nov._2006.pdf?nodeid=443383&vernum=-2

... Alternatives North, the group who commissioned this Report, is interested in understanding the financial implications of constructing the MGP, specifically the financial characteristics of the proposed natural gas fields: what are the returns (total and by field) that can be expected under conventional assumptions; what is the time profile of these returns; and of these returns, how much will accrue to the proponents and how much to various orders of government. In addition, they are interested in the level of government revenues the MV Pipeline and the Gathering System will generate, particularly the expected amount accruing to the Government of the NWT. ... In order to answer these questions, Pacific Analytics was requested to build a stand-alone financial Model of the MGP, accounting for the construction and the operating of the MV Pipeline itself, of the assorted Gathering System components that process and deliver gas to the MV Pipeline from the various natural gas fields, and of the fields themselves. ... In order to be able to test the implications of different assumptions (e.g., different production scenarios, different natural gas/condensate prices, different capital investment costs, etc.), the Model was designed such that all important variables (including all royalty/tax statutory rates including write-off and Canadian Development Expense - CDE - rates) can be changed by the user. ... A forensic peer review of the Model was undertaken in order to ensure that all of the Model results are calculated correctly. ... To 2055 the direct and indirect impacts of building and operating the MV Pipeline are expected to increase GDP in Canada by $115.3 billion, with the NWT receiving the bulk of that increase ($102.0 billion). Of the $11.5 billion in Labour Income earned throughout Canada (208,962 person-years of work), some $3.9 billion (58,659 person-years of work) will be earned within the NWT. However, it is expected that a large number of employees working in the NWT will have permanent residence elsewhere. The expected employment and payroll of NWT residents are estimated at 34,737 person-years and $2.14 billion respectively. Peak development impacts occur in 2010, generating $1.5 billion in GDP in Canada, of which $552.8 million takes place in NWT. Peak operations impacts occur in 2014, generating $2.8 billion in GDP within Canada. In this case, almost all of the impacts ($2.6 billion) fall within the NWT. To provide some context, this GDP impact in 2014 would represent an increase of about 64% to the present economy of the NWT. In addition to Royalties and Corporate Income Taxes, the MGP is expected to contribute $3.2 billion to the Federal Government and another $1.6 billion to various provincial, territorial and local governments. Of the latter, the Government of the NWT (and local authorities) is expected to receive $0.3 billion over the life of the Pipeline. (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project NEB hearing order GH-1-2004. Written evidence of Environment Canada. Submitted to the National Energy Board, June 1, 2005 (updated October 2, 2006)   /   Canada. Environment Canada
Yellowknife, N.W.T. : Environmental Protection Branch, Environment Canada, 2006.
32, [1] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project National Energy Board master with exhibit numbers)
Appendices.
References in Appendix A.
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69117. The DVD version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file from the Web.
Submitted Chuck Brumwell, Manager, Mackenzie Gas Project Review, Environmental Protection Operations Division, on behalf of Environment Canada.
ASTIS record 69126 describes "Air emissions management framework for the upstream oil and gas sector" which is referenced by this report.
ASTIS record 69125.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/432972

... The Department of the Environment (Environment Canada) has reviewed information filed by the Applicants in support of their applications pursuant to the National Energy Board Act and the Canadian Oil and Gas Operations Act to construct and operate the Mackenzie Gas project (MGP). The proposed project will include three onshore gas fields in the Mackenzie Delta area, the Mackenzie Gathering System, the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline and related facilities. ... Environment Canada's submission focuses on the management of air emissions from the MGP and on ensuring that the construction, operation and decommissioning of that portion of the MGP located within the Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary is undertaken in a manner consistent with the ecological sensitivity of this federal protected area. Following this Introduction, the submission is divided into 4 parts: Chapter 1 provides an overview of Environment Canada's mandate; Chapter 2 provides specific comments and recommendations relating to air emissions; Chapter 3 addresses issues of concern relating to the Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary; and Chapter 4 summarizes the recommendations extracted from the text of Chapters 2 and 3. A list of potential witnesses and references are attached as Appendices to this submission. ... Conclusions - Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary: 3.30 Environment Canada has responsibility to ensure that activities within the KIBS, authorized by permit pursuant to the Migratory Birds Sanctuary Regulations, are consistent with the protection of migratory birds or eggs, nests or habitat within the Sanctuary. 3.31 Although each application for a permit is considered individually on its merits, Environment Canada has established an upper limit of 1% (6.23 square kilometres) of long term cumulative impact on habitat within the KIBS. 3.32 In order to reduce the disturbances to migratory birds, certain activities within the KIBS are restricted at specific times. In the MGP project area, it is likely that activities related to construction, operation, monitoring and decommissioning of the project will be restricted between the months of May and October. ... Air Emissions Management: Should the NEB decide to issue a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to the Applicants, Environment Canada recommends that the NEB consider making the certificate subject to the following conditions: 1. To meet the intent of the Canada-wide standards for PM and Ozone, the MGP should be designed and operated using pollution prevention principles and best available economically feasible technologies to appropriately manage the emissions of PM and of precursors to PM and ozone. 2. To meet the intent of the Canada-wide Acid Rain Strategy, the MGP should be designed and operated using BAT and BMPs to appropriately manage the emissions of SO2 and NOx. 3. ... Any incinerators used in the MGP should be required to meet the emission limits in the Canada-wide standards for Mercury Emissions as well as the Canada-wide standards for Dioxins and Furans. 4. Should the MGP employ any glycol dehydrators for gas conditioning, glycol dehydrators should be designed, installed and operated in accordance with CAPP's recommended practices .... 5. Before commencement of pipeline construction, the Applicants should be required to provide a more detailed submission on final design choices regarding compressor facilities, gathering sytems and pipelines, addressing the following: i) A compilation of all of the measures to mitigate methane leakage and venting throughout the system ...; ii) Details on how overall system operation optimization and maintenance scheduling would be done to maximize system reliability and safety, optimize energy efficiency and minimize methane and air contaminant releases; iii) Details concerning design choices for the capture and use of exhaust energy at the Inuvik gas processing plant; and iv) Details on the various compressor stations regarding unit size, efficiency and conformity with the CCME National Emission Guidelines for Stationary Combustion Turbines .... Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary: Should the NEB decide to issue an Authorization to construct and operate facilities within the KIBS, Environment Canada recommends that the NEB give special consideration to the long term impacts of such activities on migratory bird habitat. (Au)

Government of the Yukon submission to the Joint Review Panel - hearing topic 9 : education, training, employment & procurement, submitted November 17, 2006   /   Yukon
[Whitehorse, Yukon : Yukon Government], 2006.
i, 39 p. : ill., map ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
A one-page letter, sent from Gordon M. Nettleton, of Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt, addressed to Ms. Paula Pacholek, Joint Review Panel Manager, precedes this submission.
ASTIS record 69160.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Yukon%20Government%20-%20Oil%20and%20Gas%20Development%20-%20Pipeline%20Branch/061117_Yukon_Govt_Submission_Topic_9.pdf

1.0 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: This Submission provides the Yukon Government's ("YG") views on Topic 9: "Education, Training, Employment, and Procurement". In this submission, the YG provides information and discussion concerning the issues and topics found in the Joint Review Panel's "Guidance Document for Hearings" as revised July 19, 2006 and as applicable to Yukon. This Submission is organized into three parts. Part 1 discusses the Education and Training systems in Yukon and how these systems may provide assistance to the Mackenzie Gas Project ("MGP Project" or "Project") by maximizing employment opportunities for northerners and assisting the Proponent in meeting its significant labour force requirements. Baseline information about educational attainment, programs, services and facilities in Yukon is also provided. Conclusions are also presented that discuss ways in which the Proponent's policies plans and commitments may be expanded to include Yukon's education systems. Part 2 discusses Employment baseline information concerning Yukon's work force. A discussion of relevant considerations and potential constraints that may affect Yukon's employment participation in the Project is provided. The ways in which Yukon's labour participation in the Project may be strengthened is also provided. Part 3 discusses the topic of Procurement. Baseline information is provided concerning Yukon's business capacity. The discussion then focuses upon potential constraints that may affect business opportunities for Yukon businesses, and ways in which opportunities may be strengthened. ... (Au)

Parks Canada's written submission to the Joint Review Panel for the Mackenzie Gas Project : Joint Review Panel topic 15 hearing   /   Parks Canada
[Ottawa : Parks Canada, 2006].
11 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
References.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 69166.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Parks%20Canada/070824_PC_revised_Topic_15_wrsub.pdf

Introduction: In January 2006, Parks Canada provided an intervention on the proposed Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) to the Joint Review Panel (JRP) (Parks Canada 2006) [described in ASTIS record 59154]. This intervention provides more details on the topic of cumulative effects, which were only briefly mentioned in our previous submission. Parks Canada is considered a federal authority under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act for this project review. Parks Canada has expertise in the management of national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. Our focus as an intervener in the Joint Review Panel hearings for the Mackenzie Gas Project has been to examine the potential effects of the proposed project on national parks, national historic sites, and the Pingo Canadian Landmark. This submission: describes Parks Canada's mandate and role with respect to cumulative effects; evaluates the proponents' response to the Environmental Impact Statement Terms of Reference (ToR) with respect to cumulative effects related to Parks Canada's mandate; analyzes cumulative effects from Parks Canada's point of view; and presents Parks Canada's recommendations to mitigate likely cumulative effects on national parks. (Au)

Submissions of the Government of the Yukon - hearing topic 11 : project-related economic costs and physical infrastructure impacts, submitted June 2, 2006   /   Yukon
[Whitehorse, Yukon : Yukon Government], 2006.
16, [2] p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
A one-page letter, sent from Gordon M. Nettleton, of Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt, addressed to Ms. Paula Pacholek, Joint Review Panel Manager, precedes this submission.
Partial contents: Appendix 1: Klondike/Dempster Highway availability data.
ASTIS record 69168.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Yukon%20Government%20-%20Oil%20and%20Gas%20Development%20-%20Pipeline%20Branch/060602_Govt_of_Yukon_Ltr&Sub_to_JRP.pdf

1.0 Introduction: Pursuant to the Joint Review Panel's ("JRP") Directions on Procedure and Notice of Hearings dated December 20, 2005 (JRPPN 11), the Yukon Government ("Yukon") is pleased to provide submissions concerning Topic 11 "Project-related Economic Costs and Physical Infrastructure Impacts". This submission specifically addresses transportation matters related to regional physical infrastructure (i.e. highways) and the capacity and resources Yukon utilizes to manage its highway operations. Yukon understands that its highway system is considered by the Proponents of the Mackenzie Gas Pipeline Project ("MGP Project" or Project") to be one of six transportation systems used for the delivery of Project supplies and equipment. The Yukon highway system is operated and maintained by Yukon Government Department of Highways and Public Works ("Highways Department"). Planning for both the expected and contingent use of the highways, including the timely development of any applicable mitigation plans are areas of interest to the Yukon Government. To date, Yukon understands that the planned usage of the Yukon highway system is only expected to result in marginal increases in vehicular traffic. Increased use above a predicted nominal level is at present only expected as a contingency outcome when materials and equipment cannot be transported via the Mackenzie River or ocean barging. While Yukon appreciates the Applicant's rationale, it is nonetheless important that appropriate early planning is undertaken in respect of such contingencies. This is particularly so in this case given the magnitude of the MGP, the potential risks that project delay may have, and taking into account the existing resource levels available to the Highways Department and whether these capacities would be sufficient to deal with significant contingency events. To assist the JRP in understanding the Yukon's concerns and interests, this submission is organized as follows: 1. Introduction; 2. TheYukon Highway System; 3. Yukon Highway System Operations; 4. Incremental MGP Use of the Yukon Highway System; 5. Impact of Potential Transportation Activities; 6. Need for Mitigation Measures; 7. Conclusions and Recommendations. ... (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's written submission on the Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review for the Joint Review Panel Technical Hearing : theme 2 : physical environment - land, water and air : topic 6 : water quality and quantity, August 23-24, 2006, Norman Wells   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Ottawa : Natural Resources Canada, 2006.
14 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
Report date: July 26, 2006.
Cover title.
References.
ASTIS record 69183.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/060803_NRCAN_Aug_23-24-06_water_wrsub.pdf

Introduction: ... The current submission provides NRCan's more detailed submission on topics that will be addressed during the August 23-24, 2006 JRP technical hearings on Theme 2: Physical Environment - Land, Water and Air; Topic 6 Water Quality and Quantity, Fish and Aquatic Habitat. In particular this NRCan submission, prepared by experts from the Geological Survey of Canada, of NRCan's Earth Science Sector, addresses the following subjects: Stream and River Crossings (section 2.17 - NRCan Summary submission); Run-off, Erosion and Sedimentation (section 2.18 - NRCan Summary submission); Climate Change Aspects of Stream Crossings (section 2.19.4 - NRCan Summary Submission). ... The format for NRCan's detailed technical review comments is generally as follows, for each topic: a brief introductory statement of the geoscience topic/issue and potential related environmental impact; NRCan's review/analysis, referenced to the relevant EIS and supporting/supplemental documents, to the Information Requests (IRs) and the Proponent's responses, as well to any additional information received through workshops or meetings with the Proponent; Summary; Recommendations to the JRP; References. (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's written submission on the Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review for the Joint Review Panel Technical Hearing : theme 2 : physical environment - land, water and air : topic 3a : pipeline and gathering system routing and design, August 15-16, 2006, Yellowknife   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Ottawa : Natural Resources Canada, 2006.
38 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
References.
Report date: July 26, 2006.
Cover title.
ASTIS record 69184.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/060726_NRCAN_Aug_15-16-06_wrsub.pdf

Introduction: ... The current submission provides NRCan's more detailed submission on topics that will be addressed during the August 15-16, 2006 JRP technical hearings on Theme 2: Physical Environment - Land, Water and Air; Topic 3a Pipeline and Gathering System Routing and Design. In particular this NRCan submission, prepared by experts from the Geological Survey of Canada, of NRCan's Earth Science Sector, addresses the following subjects: Baseline Terrain and Permafrost Conditions and Environmental Impacts in the MGP Corridor (section 2.14 - NRCan Summary Submission); Slope Stability and Processes (section 2.15 - NRCan Summary Submission; Climate Change - Scenarios and Projected Conditions (section 2.19.1 - NRCan Summary Submission); Climate Change and Variability - Impacts on Baseline Permafrost Conditions and the Project (section 2.19.2 NRCan Summary Submission); MGP and Enbridge Pipelines Proximity and Crossings (section 2.21 NRCan Summary Submission). ... The analyses and reviews presented in this NRCan submission are based on material filed with the JRP to June 30, 2006. The format for NRCan's detailed technical review comments is generally as follows, for each topic: a brief introductory statement of the geoscience topic/issue and potential related environmental impact; NRCan's review/analysis, referenced to the relevant EIS and supporting/supplemental documents, to the Information Requests (IRs) and the Proponent's responses, as well to any additional information received through workshops or meetings with the Proponent; Summary; Recommendations to the JRP; References. ... As NRCan, has previously stated, our technical reviews are dynamic, and may change as new or additional materials continue to be filed and information exchanged. Thus our recommendations may be subject to change and/or refinement as the JRP process continues. NRCan will provide the JRP with any updated recommendations prior to the closure of the JRP hearings. (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review written submission - Joint Review Panel topic specific hearing theme 3 : biological environment - fish and wildlife and their habitats. Topic 7: wildlife and wildlife habitat, migratory birds including Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary (November 15-16, 2006)   /   Canada. Environment Canada
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.] : Environment Canada, 2006.
81 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Appendices.
References.
Cover title.
Submission dated: February 24, 2006.
ASTIS record 69537.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/603289

1. Introduction: The Joint Review Panel (JRP) is mandated to identify, evaluate, and report on the potential impacts of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) on physical, biological and human environments. This includes a consideration of the potential impacts of MGP on migratory birds and their habitat, including the impacts within the Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary (KIBS). This submission focuses on activities associated with the three anchor fields and the potential impacts to migratory birds within the Mackenzie Delta, including KIBS. ... 7. Conclusion: Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary is a part of one of the worlds' great deltas. The Mackenzie Delta is important for wildlife, and particularly so for migratory birds. Migratory birds are abundant and distributed throughout the region from the time they arrive in the spring to the time they begin their migration southward for the winter. KIBS is unlike other areas in the Mackenzie Delta; as a federal Migratory Bird sanctuary, it is the only place specifically affording protection to migratory bird habitat. EC is managing the Sanctuary to conserve its long term integrity. EC recognizes that the Proponent has rights, but not unfettered rights, for operating within the Sanctuary. Regulation is directed at avoiding and minimizing permanent long term physical impacts that may arise from the MGP, induced development, and other activities. EC is taking an adaptive approach to managing cumulative effects within KIBS. EC will rely on new directed studies, monitoring, and evaluations to inform decision-making in an iterative fashion. Subsidence is considered to be the most significant threat to the integrity of the Sanctuary. With no technological "fixes" for subsidence, mitigation must include compensation, as habitat offsets, if the threshold is exceeded. Mitigation must be in place before gas flows from the Project, as is standard for all mitigation. There is considerable uncertainty concerning predicted subsidence, predictions of flooding from subsidence, and the pace of induced development. This necessitates that a precautionary approach be taken to achieve the conservation objectives for KIBS. This management approach includes applying a 1% threshold for cumulative physical habitat impacts and the use of habitat offsets to address impacts which exceed this threshold. The management of KIBS, in the context of minimizing cumulative effects, means having to consider the individual and synergistic effects of all the threats to migratory birds in all stages of the birds' life cycles. This includes consideration of the MGP and potential induced development on various temporal and spatial scales. EC will vigorously pursue the adoption of best available technologies and the ongoing evaluation of performance by those operating within the Sanctuary. In the broader context, EC will contribute to sustainability through inclusive integrated resource planning and implementation processes for achieving conservation for the Delta. A summary of recommendations and positions included in this submission follows. ... (Au)

Mackenzie Gas Project greenhouse gas analysis - a consolidated report by the Pembina Institute   /   Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development   McCulloch, M.   Wong, R.   Powell, G.   Moorhouse, J.   Sierra Club of Canada [Sponsor]
Drayton Valley, Alta. : Pembina Institute, 2007.
ii, 2, iv, 57, [10] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
Appendices.
Indexed a PDF file from the Web.
Report date: August 2007.
Presented by Sierra Club of Canada to the Joint Review Panel as evidence relating to Mackenzie Gas Project review.
ASTIS record 64394.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.pembina.org/pub/1692
Web: http://www.pembina.org/reports/mgp-ghg-consolidated-report.pdf

This report was written for the Sierra Club of Canada for presentation to the Joint Review Panel (JRP) conducting the environmental assessment of the Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP). ... it estimates the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are likely to be associated with the MGP, both from operations (upstream) and through combustion of sales gas (downstream). It then provides comparisons to put those emissions in context; including considering natural gas use in the oil sands. Lastly it provides ideas for reducing GHG emissions resulting from the operation of the MGP. This report considers six different MGP development scenarios as based on a report commissioned by Imperial Oil Resources Venture Ltd. ... Calculations are based on the emissions data provided for the Environmental Impact Statement in the June 8th 2005 Information Request Response to the Sierra Club of Canada, and do not account for any changes project proponents may have made in the design of the MGP since that time. The following are the primary conclusions of the report for consideration by the JRP, based on the specific objectives of the analysis. How significant are the estimated annual and total lifetime-of-the-project (cumulative) greenhouse gas emissions for the different MGP development scenarios - for both the operation of the pipeline (upstream) and combustion of the gas (downstream)? [1] The development scenarios contribute up to four times the GHG emissions than the EIS scenario. [2] The Maximum Capacity and Sproule scenarios have over double the maximum annual GHG emissions than the other scenarios. [3] All non-EIS scenarios generate emissions 10 to 20 years further into the future than the EIS scenario. [4] GHG emissions actually increase over the life of the project due to inlet compression requirements. [5] Natural gas sold that ends up being combusted is seven to thirteen times more than the upstream emissions over the life of the project. [6] Further work is needed to determine the additional downstream GHG emissions from NGL use. How significant are GHG emissions associated with the MGP project in the context of the NWT and Canada? [1] The EIS scenario, having the least gas production, would represent an increase of 41% over the cumulative 'business as usual' GHG emissions in the NWT between 2006 and 2053. [2] The Sproule Scenario, producing the most gas, would represent an increase of 167% over the cumulative (and conservative) 'business as usual' GHG emissions in the NWT between 2006 and 2053. [3] Considering the total upstream and downstream emissions for each of the scenarios, the more conservative estimate shows that this would constitute 1-6% of Canada's projected cumulative emissions out to 2053 based on a steady 1% annual increase in Canada's emissions beyond 2020. This would be a higher proportion assuming Canada reduced its emissions over time based on federal and provincial policies. How does the MGP relate to Canada's Oil Sands? [1] Oil sands projects could easily consume all the gas supplied by the MGP based on supply and demand estimates, with the MGP never supplying more than 40% of the natural gas demand projected for the oil sands. [2] Delivering 10 Mm³/d (0.35 BCF) of natural gas to the oil sands enables the emission of 40 Mt CO2eq/yr in the oil sands from natural gas production, bitumen production and upgrading, crude oil transmission, crude oil refining, transport fuel delivery and transport fuel combustion. ... [3] It should be considered whether cleaner burning natural gas is actually suitable for the oil sands should carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) be planned for the industrial region; in which case the waste product 'petcoke' could be a primary fuel source in the oil sands. Natural gas could instead be more beneficially employed for end-uses at which CCS is unlikely to be available. [6] For each kilometre driven, a vehicle powered by natural gas would generate 48% less GHG emissions than a vehicle powered by gasoline originating from oil sands on a lifecycle basis. How significant are the GHG emissions resulting from the operation of the MGP relative to emissions from vehicle use? [1] The peak annual GHG emissions generated by operating the MGP (i.e. upstream emissions) are expected to be equivalent to the GHG emissions from between 400,000 and 800,000 light vehicles operating annual, representing between 2 and 5% of all light vehicles registered in Canada. [2] When downstream emissions are included, the total emissions are equivalent to thee missions from between 5.5 and 8.4 million light vehicles operating annual, representing 31 to 48% of all light vehicles registered in Canada (this assumes 100% combustion). The Sproule scenario, for which annual ghg emissions were not available, would be significantly higher. What are possible options to reduce or offset GHG emissions from the operation of the pipeline? Possible options for reducing or offsetting GHG emissions generated by operating the MGP (i.e. upstream emissions) include: using eco-efficient technologies for combustion, flaring, venting, and preventing leaks; purchasing GHG offsets through the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism; purchasing or investing in domestic GHG offsets and offset projects, establishing internal corporate GHG emissions trading system. GHG offsets vary greatly in there quality and environmental integrity. A fundamental criterion when purchasing offsets is to ensure the project generating the reductions is beyond business as usual practice. Otherwise the seller of the offset gets credit for what he or she would have done anyway, and we are no further ahead in reducing total emission as the purchaser of the offset simply continues to pollute (leading to no net reductions). (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's comprehensive written submission on the Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review for the Joint Review Panel Hearing : topic 17 : recommendations, November 6-8, 2007, Inuvik, NWT   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Ottawa : Natural Resources Canada, 2007.
150, 9 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
A one-page letter, sent from Livain Michaud, of NRC Science and Policy Integration, addressed to Ms. Paula Pacholek, Joint Review Panel Manager, precedes this submission.
Report date: October 12, 2007.
Cover title.
Appendix.
References.
ASTIS record 69175.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/NRCan%20Topic17%20Recommendations%20Table%20-%20Final.pdf

Introduction: ... On January 17, 2006, NRCan filed a Summary Submission (exhibit J-NRCAN-00032) [described in ASTIS record 58528] that outlined the general context for NRCan's review: the NRCan mandate, its roles and responsibilities relative to the MGP, and its participation in the JRP process. As well, it provided a short summary and a list of recommendations for each of the technical topics reviewed by NRCan. Since the filing of that Summary Submission, NRCan has: reviewed and responded to additional information filed throughout the course of the JRP process; met with the Proponent on technical matters and informed the JRP of such meetings; worked with and provided advice to other government departments on technical matters when requested; responded to information requests and undertakings; filed detailed technical submissions containing its analysis and recommendations on the topics outlined in its January 2006 Summary Submission (see Table 1 below); and, presented technical information and expert advice to the JRP at a number of technical and general topic-specific hearings. This detailed submission (October 12, 2007) presents NRCan's complete technical review of the MGP EIS and supplementary information filed during the JRP process. It contains the most recent detailed analysis of each of the 22 subject areas / topics reviewed by NRCan, compiled in one comprehensive submission. For each topic reviewed, the analysis provides the history of the review, allowing the reader to understand the evolution of analysis and the reasoning which has led to the recommendations. It is important to note that the detailed analysis for more than half the topics have been previously filed with the JRP. Most of the material contained in this October 2007 Submission is essentially unchanged from the previous submissions, other than minor changes of an editorial nature. Nine of the NRCan topics have been updated in this submission as a result of one or more of the following: new information provided during the JRP process, Proponent rebuttals to NRCan hearing presentations, further technical analysis and/or meetings. For these subject areas, the recommendations have been revised where appropriate. However the recommendations have not substantively changed since last filed. In the case of two subject areas, (sections 2.5 and 2.22), the detailed analysis is provided for the first time; although their summaries and recommendations were previously filed in the NRCan Summary Submission dated January 2006. Table 1 provides the dates and exhibit numbers of all the submissions filed by NRCan during the course of the JRP hearing phase. Table 2 provides a guide to NRCan's formal submissions on its review topics, including dates of initial submissions and subsequent updates. Topics updated in October 2007, are indicated by an (*) in column "Oct 07" on the far right. Table 3 briefly summarizes NRCan's participation in technical hearings. In addition, in the body of the report that follows, each section title is followed by a note indicating when the section was submitted or updated. Where there are one or more updates to a section, this chronology is presented. The present tense, when used in the earlier stages of an updated review, indicates the time that those comments were submitted/updated not necessarily October 2007. The format for the review topics is generally as follows: Title followed by a brief introductory statement of the geoscience topic /issue and potential related environmental impact; Review of Proponent's Information: NRCan's review/analysis, referenced to the relevant EIS and supporting/supplemental documents, to the Information Requests (IRs) and the Proponent's responses, as well to any additional information received through workshops or meetings; Summary: concluding remarks or opinion based on NRCan's complete review; Recommendations to the JRP; and References. (Au)

Natural Resources Canada's written submission on the Mackenzie Gas Project Environmental Assessment Review for the Joint Review Panel : General Hearing topic 14 : environmental (biophysical, socio-cultural and economic) management plans, monitoring and follow-up programs, May 2-4, 2007, Yellowknife   /   Canada. Natural Resources Canada
Ottawa : Natural Resources Canada, 2007.
18 p. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - Joint Review Panel : intervenors)
(Mackenzie Gas Project Joint Review Panel master with exhibit numbers)
Available as a PDF file on a DVD described by ASTIS record 69119. This version was indexed.
Also available as a PDF file on the Web.
Appendix.
Report date: April 12, 2007.
Cover title.
References.
ASTIS record 69182.
Languages: English
Web: http://www.ngps.nt.ca/Upload/Interveners/Natural%20Resources%20Canada/070412_NRCan%20Topic14%20Wrt%20submission.pdf

Preface: ... The current submission provides NRCan's detailed analysis and recommendations relevant to the biophysical component of the JRP's Topic 14 - Environmental Management Plans, Monitoring and Follow-up Programs. This submission forms the basis for NRCan's presentation which will be made during the May 2-4, 2007 JRP Topic 14 hearings in Yellowknife. The present submission updates and significantly expands NRCan's general summary and recommendations on monitoring and follow-up in section 2.23 of its January 2006 submission [described in ASTIS record 58528]. This submission has a geoscience perspective, based on the scientific expertise provided by NRCan's Earth Science Sector (ESS) and largely its Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), a science-based organization with active field research and monitoring activities in the Mackenzie Delta and Valley. This submission also draws upon the GSC's extensive experience/involvement in collaborative research and monitoring of the Enbridge Norman Wells to Zama oil pipeline. The submission is based on a review of material filed by the Proponent to March 31, 2007. It also draws upon NRCan's previous written submissions, where these have included comments relevant to Topic 14. ... (Au)

Kendall Island Bird Sanctuary, Taglu site, NWT : sound monitoring survey   /   ATCO Noise Management Ltd.   Canadian Wildlife Service [Sponsor]
[Yellowknife, N.W.T.?] : CWS [distributor], 2007.
23 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Northern Gas Project Secretariat public registry for the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project - National Energy Board : intervenors)
Indexed from a PDF file on the Web.
Cover title.
Appendix A: Guide and abbreviations - Appendix B: Calibration certificates - Appendix C: Meteorological conditions.
References.
Report date: Aug. 21, 2007.
Project no. 672700.
ASTIS record 69526.
Languages: English
Web: https://apps.neb-one.gc.ca/REGDOCS/File/Download/603485

1.0 Introduction: ATCO Noise Management (ATCO) was retained by Canadian Wildlife Services (CWS) to complete a sound monitoring survey at the site of the proposed Taglu Gas Conditioning Facility near Inuvik NWT. The purpose of this survey is to determine the ambient sound level at this location. Sound levels were measured and recorded at the Taglu site from August 1 to August 3, 2007. This report documents the survey results and recommends an ambient sound level based on measurement results using isolation analysis. 1.1 Site Description: The site of the proposed Taglu gas conditioning facility is located on the Mackenzie Delta inside the Kendall Island bird sanctuary, approximately 120 km NNW of Inuvik and 75 km west of Tuktoyaktuk. The site is remote and pristine, in that there is presently very little human activity in the vicinity and there are no permanent roadways or frequent aircraft flyovers nearby. The terrain surrounding the site is predominantly flat, consisting of artic tundra and wetlands, covered in low lying vegetation. Figures 1 and 2 show the environment surrounding the site during summertime conditions ... The acoustic environment at the Taglu site consists of a few natural sources of sound and is largely unaltered by human activity. This sound monitoring survey has documented the ambient sound level present during summertime conditions. When isolation analysis techniques are used to distinguish the ambient sound level from extraneous noise intrusions, the ambient sound level is found to be approximately 23 dBA. Measurement data does not indicate a significant change in ambient sound level correlating to the time of day (or night). ... (Au)

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