Hydrocarbon Impacts = Incidences des hydrocarbures

Key Publications

Traditional knowledge guide for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Northwest Territories : volume 1 : literature review and evaluation   /   Kavik-Axys Inc.   FMA Heritage Resources Consulting Inc.   Fedirchuk, G.J.   Labour, S.   Niholls, N.   Environmental Studies Research Funds (Canada) [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : ESRF, 2008.
v, 71 p. ; 28 cm.
(Environmental Studies Research Funds report, no. 153)
ISBN 0-921652-65-8
A PDF file of the draft report, dated August 2005, which is subject to consultation and validation with stakeholders, is available on the Web.
Personal authors of this report: Gloria J. Fedirchuk, Sherri Labour, and Nicole Niholls (T.p. verso.).
Report date: March 2008.
Appendix A: Annotated bibliography.
Bibliography: p. 24-71.
ASTIS record 63413 describes volume II Traditional knowledge guide : using traditional knowledge in impact assessments.
The executive summary is also available in French.
ASTIS record 63412.
Languages: English
Web: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2008/neb-one/NE22-4-153E-1.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Executive Summary: The objective of the research completed under Phase 1 of ESRF-04-048 was to provide background information on the current status of traditional knowledge collection and use in impact assessment. Literature review pertaining to current legislation and policy, traditional knowledge guidelines and use in impact assessments was undertaken. This review forms the basis for the traditional knowledge guide to be prepared in Phase II. An annotated bibliography of the literature reviewed was prepared and forms an appendix to this volume. In the analyses, working concepts, terms and definitions were developed specifically for use in the guide. The past 20 to 30 years have seen a significant change in not only the manner in which traditional knowledge is collected but also in the relative importance given to this information in the assessment process. Starting almost as a disparate collection of information, use and assessment of traditional knowledge, traditional knowledge has come to be recognized as a discipline in its own right. Both legislation and assessment practices indicate that greater Aboriginal involvement in the assessment process is necessary if this process is to accurately account for and reflect the predicted nature of effects associated with proposed projects. As a consequence, Aboriginal values and mores need to be considered and respected when traditional knowledge information is collected and used. (Au)

Traditional knowledge guide for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Northwest Territories : volume II : using traditional knowledge in impact assessments   /   Kavik-Axys Inc.   FMA Heritage Resources Consulting Inc.   Fedirchuk, G.J.   Labour, S.   Nicholls, N.   Environmental Studies Research Funds (Canada) [Sponsor]
Calgary, Alta. : ESRF, 2008.
viii, 51, A-1 - A-3, B-1 - B-6, v, 16, D-1 - D-2, E-1 - E-3, F-1 - F-2, G-1 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
(Environmental Studies Research Funds report, no. 153)
ISBN 0-921652-81-X
Personal authors of this report: Gloria J. Fedirchuk, Sherri Labour, and Nicole Niholls (T.p. verso.).
Partial contents: ESRF traditional knowledge manual review workshop, June 7-8, 2007, Inuvik, NWT / Kavik-Axys Inc.
A preliminary draft was produced in 2005, the final draft was released subject to consultation and validation with stakeholders.
ASTIS record 63412 describes volume 1 Traditional knowledge guide : literature review and evaluation.
Appendices.
References.
Report date: March 2008.
French executive summary available.
ASTIS record 63413.
Languages: English
Web: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2008/neb-one/NE22-4-153E-2.pdf
Libraries: ACU

Executive Summary: The traditional knowledge manual developed as Phase II of ESRF-04-048 is essentially a management document for proponents, consultants and responsible authorities concerned with the role of traditional knowledge in the impact assessment process. The guide stresses consideration and understanding of cultural differences in this process. As working concepts, a distinction is made between traditional knowledge, traditional environmental knowledge and traditional land use in order to help 'compartmentalize' not only the scope, but also different kinds of traditional knowledge information. The guide discusses and provides approaches to developing collection and use protocols, engaging Inuvialuit people, and collection strategies. Discussion pertaining to needs related to project and assessment scoping, information sharing and assessment process [sic]. The benefits of using Traditional Knowledge are provided. As a means of illustrating how and when traditional knowledge can be used in the assessment process, each stage is discussed and real-life examples provided as to how such information was used or could have been used in past projects. Information is also provided as to the nature and content of reports on traditional knowledge to meet both impact assessment and community needs. (Au)

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